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Tragia involucrata

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Botanical Name : Tragia involucrata
Family: Euphorbiaceae
Genus: Tragia
Species: T. involucrata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Malpighiales

Common Names:
Assamese: Dumuni Chorat
Bengali: Bichuti
English: Indian stinging nettle, climbing nettle, canchorie root-plant
Hindi: Pit Parni, Barhanta
Kannada: Turike Balli
Malayalam: Kodithumba, Cherukodithuva, Choriyanam, Coriyanam, Kodithoova
Marathi: Aagya, Laghumedhshingi, Aag Paan, Kallaavi
Nepali: Ut Kateri
Oriya: Kasalakku
Sanskrit: Duhsparsha, Vrischikacchad, Vrischikapatri, Vrischikali, Aagmavarta, Kashagnih
Tamil: Kanchori
Telugu: Telukondicettu

Habitat: Tragia involucrata is native to outer Himalayan ranges eastwards to Assam; southwards to Travancore, throughout warmer regions of India. It is mostly grown in wastecland.

Description:
Tragia involvucrata is a perennial evergreen twiner, more or less hispid. It is slender, twining herb with stinging hairs. Leaves 6-10 x 3-5.5 cm, ovate or elliptic, base acute or rounded, margin serrate, apex acuminate, hispidulous on both sides; petiole to 2.5 cm long. Spikes axillary, monoecious, to 2 cm long; male flowers above, female flowers 1-2, at the base. Male flowers c. 1.5 mm across; bracts spathulate; tepals 3, spreading; stamens 3, anthers subsessile. Female flowers c. 3 mm across, ebracteate; tepals 6, c. 1 mm long, ovate-lanceolate, enlarged and spreading in fruits; style 3, spreading. Capsule c. 0.6 x 1 cm, 3-lobed, hispid. Seeds globose….....CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES 
Medicinal Uses:
Ayurvedic , Vrishchhikaali, Vrishchhika-patrikaa. Used in Kerala as Duraalabhaa.
Siddha/Tamil , Chenthatti, Sirrukan- chori.
Action :  Root—febrifuge, diaphoretic, alterative, blood purifier. Given in fever when the extremities are cold; also for pain in arms and legs. Used as a blood purifier in venereal diseases;   applied externally to skin eruptions. Fruit—paste used in baldness.

Roots are diaphoretic, alterative, diuretic and blood purifier. They are valued in febricula and in itching of the skin, also for pains in legs and arms. Roots are also used in old venereal complaints and externally in enlarged spleen; decoction of the root is useful in relieving bronchitis and the attendant fever. The fruits are rubbed on head with a little water to cure baldness. Leaf juice is given for jaundice in Rangamati by the Chakma.

This plant is used for healing all kinds of wounds. (The methanol extract of the roots of Tragia involucrata topically tested at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg exerted significant wound healing
effect in Staphylococcus aureus-induced excision wound in rats.)

Roots are useful in pruritic skin eruptions, veneral diseases, diabetes, guinea worms. Leaves are supposed to be good for cephalagia.

Known Hazartds : Tragia involucrata leaves are highly irretant to our skin. Even if someone touches it, itching sensation on hand starts.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with  your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragia_involucrata
http://www.medicinalpedia.com/tragia-involucrata/
http://mpbd.info/plants/tragia-involucrata.php
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0367326X06000682

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Ailmemts & Remedies Featured

Fungus on Skin

The word fungus conjures up visions of mold and dirty, damp unhygienic surroundings. Many of us may cringe at the thought of developing a fungal infection. But these infections are common and most people suffer from several attacks during the course of a lifetime.
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In babies, small curd-like white patches can form in the mouth. These are difficult to remove. If scraped off, a raw red area is exposed. This is commonly called “thrush” and is caused by a fungal specie called candida. It may occur if the child is bottle fed, uses a pacifier or has recently had a course of antibiotics. It may make the child irritable while feeding.

Oral thrush may occur in adults too if they have ill-fitting dentures, suffer from diabetes, have had a course of antibiotics, consumed steroids, are on anti-cancer drugs, are smokers, or are immuno compromised as a result of medicines or HIV infection.

In adults as well as children, oral thrush can be treated with applications of anti-fungal medication like clotrimazole two or three times a day. Dentures must be cleaned regularly. Feeding bottles and artificial nipples should ideally not be used. If thrush has occurred, they must be rinsed with a solution of equal parts of vinegar and water and air dried prior to sterilisation.

Candida and some bacteria like lactobacillus normally live in perfect harmony in the vagina. The lactobacillus produces acid, which prevents the overgrowth of candida. If this balance is disrupted, candida can overgrow, resulting in infection. Imbalance occurs as a result of diabetes, pregnancy, hormonal tablets, antibiotics, steroids or immuno suppression. Frequent douching or using “feminine hygiene sprays” may also lead to infection. Vaginal fungal infections owing to candida affect almost all women. It causes redness, an uncontrollable itch and an odourless white discharge.
You may click to see :Natural solutions for Candida Albicans: Candida diet
Treatment involves the application of creams or insertion of vaginal tablets for one, three or six days. Sometimes oral medicines have to be taken. The bacteria-fungus balance in the vagina can be restored by eating lactobacillus. This is found in homemade curd. A tablespoon a day usually restores the balance.

Men can develop candida infection on the foreskin, especially if they are diabetic. The skin is itchy and may develop fissures. Topical anti-fungal creams work well.

Men are also prone to developing “jock itch” (or dhobi’s itch), an infection of the groin area where the skin is usually warm and moist. Infection is precipitated by wearing tight undergarments, or not changing sweaty exercise clothes promptly. Treatment involves bathing regularly, wearing loose-fitting clothes and application of anti-fungal creams.

The warm moist areas between the toes may also develop a fungal infection called Tinea pedis or athlete’s foot. It causes itching, burning, cracking and at times blisters. It occurs with wearing damp socks and tight airless shoes, especially of a non-porous material like plastic.

To prevent Tinea pedis, the feet need to be aired and socks changed regularly. Once infection has developed, the feet should be soaked in equal quantities of water and vinegar for 10 minutes a day. After wiping them dry, an anti-fungal cream needs to be applied. The infection may take two to four weeks to clear up.

The warm and moist areas of the inner thighs, genitalia, armpits, under the breasts, and waist may also develop fungal infection and become red, itchy, oozy and sore. This is common in overweight individuals and those with diabetes. Treatment is by bathing regularly and keeping the area dry. Talcum powder aggravates the problem. Instead, the area should be patted dry after a bath and a combination of a “diaper rash” cream containing zinc oxide and an anti-fungal medication must be applied.

Toe nails and fingernails can also get infected by fungus. The nail then hurts, breaks easily and becomes discoloured. This occurs if the nails are constantly exposed to moisture or are immersed in water, if non-absorbent socks or shoes are used, or if the person has diabetes. Treatment is with applications and medications for one and a half to six months. Soaking the feet in a solution of one part vinegar and two parts water for 10 minutes daily and then applying Vicks VapoRub has anecdotally been shown to be effective.

The outer layers of the skin can develop scaly white patches of Tinea versicolor infection. Moist climates, sweating, humidity and hormonal changes have been blamed for this. The infection responds well to Selinium sulphide (Selsun) or Ketoconazole (Nizral) shampoo.

Ringworm causes round, hairless patches on the scalp and skin. They are contagious and spread by contact with infected humans or animals. Medicines have to be taken for six weeks. Topical agents are not effective.

Source : The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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Vitamin B3 Identified as a Potential Antifungal Treatment

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A team of scientists have identified vitamin B3 as a potential antifungal treatment. Infections by the yeast Candida albicans represent a significant public health problem and a common complication in immunodeficient individuals such as AIDS patients, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and recipients of organ transplants. While some treatments are available, their efficacy can be compromised by the emergence of drug-resistant strains.

The current study shows that a C. albicans enzyme, known as Hst3, is essential to the growth and survival of the yeast. Researchers found that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Hst3 with nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, strongly reduced C. albicans virulence in a mouse model. Both normal and drug-resistant strains of C. albicans were susceptible to nicotinamide. In addition, nicotinamide prevented the growth of other pathogenic Candida species and Aspergillus fumigatus (another human pathogen), thus demonstrating the broad antifungal properties of nicotinamide.

“There is an urgent need to develop new therapies to kill C. albicans because it is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections and is associated with high mortality rates,” explains study author Martine Raymond. “Although many issues remain to be investigated, the results of our study are very exciting and they constitute an important first step in the development of new therapeutic agents to treat fungal infections without major side effects for patients.”


Source
: Elements4Health

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Yeast Infection Or Vaginitis


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Definition:
This is a vaginal infection caused most commonly by the fungal organism Candida albicans.
Alternative Names
Yeast infection vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis

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Causes, incidence, and risk factors:
Anything that disturbs the normal balance of yeast and bacteria or the pH (acid/base) level in the vagina can create ideal conditions for yeast to grow uncontrolled. The normal vaginal environment can be upset by something as simple as the wearing of tight jeans or nylon underwear. The risk of yeast infections is also increased by hormonal changes during pregnancy, by the use of birth control pills or spermicides, or by diabetes

Candida albicans is a widespread organism with worldwide distribution. It is normally found in small amounts in the vagina, the mouth, the digestive tract, and on the skin without causing disease or symptoms (approximately 25% of women without disease symptoms have this organism present).

Symptoms appear when the balance between the normal microorganisms of the vagina is lost, and the Candida albicans population becomes larger in relation to the other microorganism populations.

This happens when the environment (the vagina) has certain favorable conditions that allow growth and nourishment of Candida albicans. An environment that makes it difficult for the other microorganisms to survive may also cause an imbalance and lead to a yeast infection.

Yeast infection may follow a course of antibiotics (particularly tetracycline) that were prescribed for another purpose. The antibiotics change the normal balance between organisms in the vagina by suppressing the growth of protective bacteria that normally have an antifungal effect.

Infection is common among women who use estrogen-containing birth control pills and among women who are pregnant. This is due to the increased level of estrogen in the body. The increased hormone level causes changes in the vaginal environment that make it perfect for fungal growth and nourishment.

Yeast infections may also occur in association with diabetes or problems that affect the immune system (such as AIDS or HIV).

Vaginal candidiasis is not considered a sexually transmitted disease. However, 12% to 15% of men will develop symptoms such as itching and penile rash following sexual contact with an infected partner.

Close attention should be paid to episodes of vaginal candidiasis. Repeat infections that occur immediately following therapy, or a persistent yeast infection that does not respond to therapy, may be the first or, at least, an early sign that an individual is infected with HIV.
Both males and females with HIV infection who have developed AIDS may be subject to disseminated infection with candida, including oral candidiasis (in the mouth), esophageal candidiasis (in the esophagus), and cutaneous candidiasis (on the skin).

Symptoms:
Abnormal vaginal discharge
Ranges from a slightly watery, white discharge to a thick, white, chunky discharge (like cottage cheese)
Vaginal and labial itching, burning
Redness of the vulvar skin
Inflammation of the vulvar skin
Pain with intercourse
Urination, painful

Signs and tests:
A pelvic examination will be performed. It may show inflammation of the skin of the vulva, within the vagina, and on the cervix. The examining physician may find dry, white plaques on the vaginal wall.
A wet prep (microscopic evaluation of vaginal discharge) shows Candida.

Treatment:
Generally, the first incidence of yeast infection should be treated by your health care provider. After the first infection, if a second infection occurs and is unquestionably a yeast infection, self-treatment may be initiated with over-the-counter vaginal creams such as miconazole or clotrimazole. Persistent symptoms should be evaluated by your gynecologist or primary health care provider.
Cranberry juice and yogurt are two foods that may help prevent the occurrence of yeast infections and aid in their treatment.
Medications for vaginal yeast infections are available in either vaginal cream/suppositories or oral preparations. The use oral preparation should be avoided during pregnancy.

Expectations (prognosis):
The symptoms usually disappear completely with adequate treatment.

Complications:
Chronic or recurrent infections may occur. This may be from inadequate treatment or self-reinfection.
Secondary infection may occur. Intense or prolonged scratching may cause the skin of the vulva to become cracked and raw, making it more susceptible to infection.

When to Call Your Doctor :
Call your health care provider if symptoms are unresponsive to self-treatment with recommended vaginal creams, or if other symptoms are present.
If you experience any of above symptoms for the first time.
If vaginal discharge has a strong, foul-smelling odor, or is tinged with blood.
If symptoms don’t disappear in five days despite treatment.
If the yeast infection returns within two months.
Reminder: If you have a medical condition, talk to your doctor before taking supplements or alternative medication.

Herbal Remedy:
YOU can fight yeast infection with symptoms that include a weakened immune system, constipation, diarrhea, headaches, bad breath, rectal itching, impotence, mood swings, memory loss, canker sores, heartburn, acne, night sweats, itching, stopped-up sinuses, burning tongue, white spots in the mouth, white spots on the tongue, vaginitis, kidney problems, bladder infections, mood swings, depression, fatigue, arthritis, adrenal exhaustion, hyperactivity, hypothyroidism, diabetes with these herbs from Mother Nature’s medicine chest:

Coral calcium with trace minerals, maitake mushroom, garlic extract, pau d’arco, una de gato extract, quercetin.

Prevention:
Avoid persistent and excessive moisture in the genital area by wearing underwear or pantyhose with cotton crotches, and loose fitting slacks. Avoid wearing wet bathing suits or exercise clothing for long periods of time, and wash them after each use.

Supplement Recommendations:
Vitamin C
Dosage: 1,000 mg 3 times a day.
Comments: Reduce dose if diarrhea develops.

Echinacea
Dosage: 200 mg 3 times a day.
Comments: Use in a cycle of 3 weeks on, 1 week off, for recurrent infections; standardized to contain at least 3.5% echinacosides.

Acidophilus
Dosage: 1 pill twice a day orally or as a suppository.
Comments: Get 1-2 billion live (viable) organisms per pill. Can insert oral pill into vagina; discontinue after 5 days.

Bifidus
Dosage: 1 pill twice a day.
Comments: Use a supplement that contains 1-2 billion live (viable) organisms per pill.

FOS
Dosage: 2,000 mg twice a day.
Comments: Use in combination with acidophilus and bifidus.

Tea Tree Oil
Dosage: Insert suppository into vagina every 12 hours for 5 days.
Comments: Available in health-food stores.

Vitamin A/Calendula
Dosage: Insert suppository into vagina every 12 hours for 5 days.
Comments: Available in health-food stores.

Click to learn more about Vaginitis

Natural Yeast Infection Remedies Are Perfect Yeast Fighters

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Vaginal yeast infection

Cure East Infection Holestically

Ayurvedic Treatment Of East Infection

Homeopathic Medicine for East Infection
MotherNature.com – Yeast Infection

Alternative remedies for Yeast Infection And Other Forms of VaginitisÂ

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

 

Sources:
Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs,
www.healthline.com
http://www.herbnews.org/candidiasisdone.htm

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