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Ailmemts & Remedies

Bacterial Vaginosis

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Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal infection (vaginitis). For grammatical reasons, some people prefer to call it vaginal bacteriosis. It is NOT generally considered to be a sexually transmitted infection . BV is caused by an imbalance of naturally occurring bacterial flora, and should not be confused with yeast infection (candidiasis), or infection with Trichomonas vaginalis (trichomoniasis) which are not caused by bacteria.

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Symptoms:

The most common symptom of BV is an abnormal vaginal discharge (especially after sex) with an unpleasant fishy smell. There is rarely itching.Nearly half of all women with BV don’t notice any symptoms. By contrast, a ‘normal’ discharge will be odourless and will vary in consistency and amount with your menstrual cycle – a normal discharge is at its clearest about 2 weeks before your period starts.

General Diagnosis:
When you go to your healthcare provider with questions about vaginal discharge, he or she will have several diagnoses in mind to account for it. These may include:

1.The discharge is normal for you
2.Candidiasis (thrush, or a yeast infection)
3.Trichomonas vaginalis (trichomoniasis)
4.Bacterial vaginosis
To find out which of these is the case, a few simple tests are done. The provider will carry out a speculum examination and take some swabs from high in the vagina. These swabs will be tested for:

1.A characteristic smell—this is called the whiff test. A small amount of an alkali is added to a microscope slide that has been swabbed with the discharge—a ‘fishy’ odour is a positive result for bacterial vaginosis.
2.Loss of acidity—the vagina is normally slightly acidic (with a pH of 3.8–4.2), which helps to control bacteria. A swab of the discharge is put onto litmus paper to check the acidity.A positive result for bacterial vaginosis would be a pH of over 4.5.

3.’Clue cells’—so called because they give a clue to the reason behind the discharge. These are epithelial cells (like skin) that are coated with bacteria. They can be seen under microscopic examination of your discharge.
Two positive results in addition to the discharge itself are enough to diagnose BV. If there is no discharge, then all 3 criteria are needed.

What might be done?
Your doctor may be able to diagnose bacterial vaginosis from your symptoms. swabs of any discharge may be taken and tested to confirm the diagnosis.

Causes:
Bacterial vaginosis is caused by excess growth of some of the bacteria that normally live in the vagina, particularly gardnerella vaginalis and mycoplasma hominis. as a result, the natural balance of organisms, in the vagina is altered. the reason for this excess growth is unknown, but the condition is more common in sexually active women and often, but notalways, occurs in association with sexually transmitted diseases. vaginal infections can also be caused by an overgrowth of the candida fungus and the protozoan trichomonas vaginalis. Bacterial vaginosis often causes no symptoms. however, some women have a grayish white vaginal discharge with a fishy or musty odor and vaginal or vulval itching. rarely, the disorder leads to pelvic inflammatory disease, in which some of thereproductive organs become inflamed.

A healthy vagina normally contains many microorganisms, some of the common ones are Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii. Lactobacillus, particularly hydrogen peroxide-producing species, appears to help prevent other vaginal microorganisms from multiplying to a level where they cause symptoms. (Note: Lactobacillus acidophilus is not one of the species of Lactobacillus identified as playing a protective role in vaginal flora.) The microorganisms involved in BV are very diverse, but include Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus, Bacteroides, and Mycoplasma. A change in normal bacterial flora including the reduction of lactobacillus, which may be due to the use of antibiotics or pH imbalance, allows more resistant bacteria to gain a foothold and multiply. In turn these produce toxins which affect the body’s natural defenses and make re-colonization of healthy bacteria more difficult.

Most cases of bacterial vaginosis occur in sexually active women between the ages of 15 and 44, especially after contact with a new partner. Condoms may provide some protection and there is no evidence that spermicide increases BV risk. Although BV appears to be associated with sexual activity, there is no clear evidence of sexual transmission.Rather, BV is a disordering of the chemical and biological balance of the normal flora. Recent research is exploring the link between sexual partner treatment and eradication of recurrent cases of BV. Pregnant women and women with sexually transmitted infections are especially at risk for getting this infection. Bacterial vaginosis does not usually affect women after menopause. A 2005 study by researchers at Ghent University in Belgium showed that subclinical iron deficiency (anemia) was a strong predictor of bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. A longitudinal study published in February 2006 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology showed a link between psychosocial stress and bacterial vaginosis independent of other risk factors.

Complications:
Although previously considered a mere nuisance infection, untreated bacterial vaginosis may cause serious complications, suchas increased succeptibility to sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and may present other complications for pregnant women. It has also been associated with an increase in the development of Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) following surgical procedures such as a hysterectomy or an abortion.

Modern Treatment:
Bacterial vaginosis can be cured by antibiotics such as metronidazole and clindamycin. However, there is a high rate of recurrence. Currently, there are very few over the counter products that address bacterial vaginosis. A vaginal gel product called

RepHresh claims to regulate the pH level. Boric acid capsules inserted vaginally is considered a home treatment.

Lactobacillus supplements may also be used; Fem-dophilus (Jarrow Formulas) is a lactobacillus product which specifically claims to help maintain healthy vaginal flora.

It should be noted that seeking medical attention is often necessary, because none of the over the counter products can claim to treat an active infection. More importantly, patients often inaccurately diagnose BV as a yeast infection, and delay proper treatment which may lead to complications.

In a randomized controlled trial, researchers found the efficacy of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel in treating bacterial vaginosis (cure rate 70.7%) was equivalent to that of standard oral metronidazole treatment (cure rate 71%). Treatment with vaginal metronidazole gel was associated with fewer gastrointestinal complaints.

Natural Remedies of Bacterial Vaginosis

Herbal Remedy for Bacterial Vaginosis

Homeopathic Therapeutics. Aspergillus; Candida; Notatum ..

Bacterial Vaginosis & Homeopathy

Homeopathic Medicines for Bacterial Vaginosis

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Resources:
http://www.charak.com/DiseasePage.asp?thx=1&id=226
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_vaginosis.

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Acute Otitis Media in Children

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The most common cause of earache in children is acute otitis media, which is caused by infection in the middle children are at risk because eustachian tubes, which connect the middle ear to the throat, are small and become obstructed easily. Acute otitis media is often part of a respiratory tract infection, such as the common cold. The infection causes inflammation that may block one of the eustachian tubes, causing a buildup in the middle ear that may get infected with bacteria.
1.Normal
2.Abnormal……..(1)
The part of the ear that we can see is called the outer ear. It is connected to an external canal, which is then separated from the structures of the middle ear by a thin drum like membrane called the eardrum (tympanic membrane). The middle ear is filled with air and is connected to the back of the nose by a tube like canal called the eustachian tube. The other parts beyond the middle ear are the inner ear (cochlea, semicircular canal) and the auditory nerves (carries messages to the brain).

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Otitis Media refers to an infection of the middle ear that normally follows the flu or a cold. OM can affect people at any age, but it is more common in children under the age 7.

About 1 in 5 children under age 4 has one episode of acute otitis media each year. the condition is more common in children whose parents smoke. It is also common in children of eskimo or native american descent and may run in families, suggesting a genetic factor. The condition is less common in children over the age of 8.

What are the sympotms?
Symptoms usually develop rapidly over several hours. a very young child may have difficulty locating the pain, and the only symptoms may be fever and vomiting. In older children, the symptoms may be more specific and include:

*20-40% of the cases of bacterial infections may have little or no symptoms.
*In infants, there is irritability, poor feeding, or loss of appetite may be the only symptoms for the first few months.
*In cases without bacterial infection, there may be a mild decrease in hearing or a feeling of heaviness in the ear.
*In most cases of acute OM there is:
flu, cold, sinus, throat, allergies, and earaches.
*The bone behind the ear (Mastoid bone) may hurt if it is pressed.
*Decreased hearing
*Fever may or may not be present
*If the eardrum is punctured, fluid may leak out (otorrhea)
*Hearing loss and spread of the infection to other site (brain, facial nerves and mastoid bone) can occur
* Earache.
*Tugging or rubbing the painful ear.
*Temporary impaired hearing in the affected ear.
Left untreated, the eardrum may rupture, relieving the pain but causing a discharge of blood and pus. Recurrent infections in the middle ear may cause chronic secretory otitis media.

Probable Causes:
Conditions such as a Common Cold (caused by a virus), sinuses, throat infections, allergies to tree pollen, mold spores, and mites can irritate the eustachian (E) tube and weaken its normal defenses.

Once the defenses of the eustachian tube is compromised, it is prone to invasion by bacteria, which then climb up to the air filled middle ear chamber and cause an infection. This results in fluid build up, earaches, and other symptoms.

Bacteria responsible for OM are:

Pneumococci (30-35%)
Haemophilus Influenza (20-25%)
Moraxella catarrhalis (10-15%)
Group A streptococci and Staphylococcus species (1-3%)
Up to 30% of cases of OM occur without any Bacterial infections

*Structural abnormalities of the ear or an E-tube present at birth

*Previous history of OM

*Family history of OM, especially in a sibling

*Second hand tobacco smoke

*Day care

*Allergies

*Sinus infections

*Throat infections

*Formula feeding

 

Method of Diagnosis::
Medical history and a physical examination is the first step
There may be facial pain (over the sinuses), nasal (nose) congestion, sore, red throat if allergies exist, or a sinus infection may be present.
There may be enlarged Lymph glands (pea size nodes) in the neck
The mastoid bone may hurt if doctor presses on it.
The doctor will use a special light (otoscope) to look into the ear canal, where he will see the ear drum bulging out (fluid behind it), moving poorly, or have a tear and the middle ear where fluid is leaking into the external canal.

The fluid that may have leaked out can be collected by a sterile cotton swab, and sent to the laboratory so they can identify the cause and type of the bacteria (takes 24-48 hours).

Hearing can be tested by a specialist called an audiologist.
Risk Involvement:
*Males more than females
*Ear trauma or previous ear surgery
Modern Treatment:
* Usually treated on an outpatient basis except for infants under 2 years of age with high fever.
*If not too sick, use Auralgan drops (eases the pain) and Tylenol (pain and fever) by mouth, and observe closely for the first 2-3 days.
*If symptoms persist for more than 48-72 hours, or the patient is sick, consider antibiotics.
*Antibiotics such as Amoxicillin are given by mouth for up to 10 days (or until the bacteria is identified).
*If there are 3 or more OM’s in 6 months, or 4 or more in one year, then antibiotics may be needed for up to 6 months.
*In cases where there is persistent fluid (Effusion) in the middle ear without bacteria (consider Allergy), antibiotics do not help, and Antihistamines (Claritin) or decongestants such as Entex can be tried.
*In allergic OM, where medications do not help, one may consider consulting with an allergy and Immunology doctor.
*In cases where middle ear effusion is present for more than 4 months in both ears, or more than 6 months in one ear, or, if hearing is affected (greater than 25 decibels), surgery may need to be done.
*Recurrent bacterial OM (more than 2-3) while on antibiotics may also benefit from surgery.
*An ENT (ears, nose, throat) doctor will perform all necessary surgeries.
*Surgeries include drainage of the middle ear fluid via a tiny tube (tympanostomy tube).
*The tube may be placed for days, weeks, months, or in some cases, permanently.
*A good diet that is full of vegetables, fruits, fish, and low in animal products (beef, pork, etc.) and fats may help to prevent future infections.
*Try breast-feeding your baby
*Stop smoking, especially around your children and animals.
What might be done?
You should consult you child’s doctor if liquid is discharged from the ear or if the earache last more than a few hours. he or she will examine your child’s ears and may blow air into the affected ear using a special instrument to check that the eardrum is moving normally. Acute otitis media can clear up without treatment; however, the doctor will probably prescribe antibiotics if he or she suspects that a bacterial infection is present. to relieve discomfort, acetaminophen may be recommended. After a few days, your doctor will reexamine you child.

Symptoms usually clear up in a few days with appropriate treatment. a ruptured eardrum should heal within a few weeks. In some children, hearing is affected for more than 3 months until the fluid in the ear disappears.

Research: Otitis Media

Acute Otitis Media in Children — Current Concepts

Acute Otitis Media treatment & Prevention

Healing Otitis Media Through Homeopathy

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Reources:

http://www.ecureme.com/emyhealth/data/Serous_Otitis_Media.asp
http://www.charak.com/DiseasePage.asp?thx=1&id=339

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Yeast Infection Or Vaginitis


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Definition:
This is a vaginal infection caused most commonly by the fungal organism Candida albicans.
Alternative Names
Yeast infection vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis

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Causes, incidence, and risk factors:
Anything that disturbs the normal balance of yeast and bacteria or the pH (acid/base) level in the vagina can create ideal conditions for yeast to grow uncontrolled. The normal vaginal environment can be upset by something as simple as the wearing of tight jeans or nylon underwear. The risk of yeast infections is also increased by hormonal changes during pregnancy, by the use of birth control pills or spermicides, or by diabetes

Candida albicans is a widespread organism with worldwide distribution. It is normally found in small amounts in the vagina, the mouth, the digestive tract, and on the skin without causing disease or symptoms (approximately 25% of women without disease symptoms have this organism present).

Symptoms appear when the balance between the normal microorganisms of the vagina is lost, and the Candida albicans population becomes larger in relation to the other microorganism populations.

This happens when the environment (the vagina) has certain favorable conditions that allow growth and nourishment of Candida albicans. An environment that makes it difficult for the other microorganisms to survive may also cause an imbalance and lead to a yeast infection.

Yeast infection may follow a course of antibiotics (particularly tetracycline) that were prescribed for another purpose. The antibiotics change the normal balance between organisms in the vagina by suppressing the growth of protective bacteria that normally have an antifungal effect.

Infection is common among women who use estrogen-containing birth control pills and among women who are pregnant. This is due to the increased level of estrogen in the body. The increased hormone level causes changes in the vaginal environment that make it perfect for fungal growth and nourishment.

Yeast infections may also occur in association with diabetes or problems that affect the immune system (such as AIDS or HIV).

Vaginal candidiasis is not considered a sexually transmitted disease. However, 12% to 15% of men will develop symptoms such as itching and penile rash following sexual contact with an infected partner.

Close attention should be paid to episodes of vaginal candidiasis. Repeat infections that occur immediately following therapy, or a persistent yeast infection that does not respond to therapy, may be the first or, at least, an early sign that an individual is infected with HIV.
Both males and females with HIV infection who have developed AIDS may be subject to disseminated infection with candida, including oral candidiasis (in the mouth), esophageal candidiasis (in the esophagus), and cutaneous candidiasis (on the skin).

Symptoms:
Abnormal vaginal discharge
Ranges from a slightly watery, white discharge to a thick, white, chunky discharge (like cottage cheese)
Vaginal and labial itching, burning
Redness of the vulvar skin
Inflammation of the vulvar skin
Pain with intercourse
Urination, painful

Signs and tests:
A pelvic examination will be performed. It may show inflammation of the skin of the vulva, within the vagina, and on the cervix. The examining physician may find dry, white plaques on the vaginal wall.
A wet prep (microscopic evaluation of vaginal discharge) shows Candida.

Treatment:
Generally, the first incidence of yeast infection should be treated by your health care provider. After the first infection, if a second infection occurs and is unquestionably a yeast infection, self-treatment may be initiated with over-the-counter vaginal creams such as miconazole or clotrimazole. Persistent symptoms should be evaluated by your gynecologist or primary health care provider.
Cranberry juice and yogurt are two foods that may help prevent the occurrence of yeast infections and aid in their treatment.
Medications for vaginal yeast infections are available in either vaginal cream/suppositories or oral preparations. The use oral preparation should be avoided during pregnancy.

Expectations (prognosis):
The symptoms usually disappear completely with adequate treatment.

Complications:
Chronic or recurrent infections may occur. This may be from inadequate treatment or self-reinfection.
Secondary infection may occur. Intense or prolonged scratching may cause the skin of the vulva to become cracked and raw, making it more susceptible to infection.

When to Call Your Doctor :
Call your health care provider if symptoms are unresponsive to self-treatment with recommended vaginal creams, or if other symptoms are present.
If you experience any of above symptoms for the first time.
If vaginal discharge has a strong, foul-smelling odor, or is tinged with blood.
If symptoms don’t disappear in five days despite treatment.
If the yeast infection returns within two months.
Reminder: If you have a medical condition, talk to your doctor before taking supplements or alternative medication.

Herbal Remedy:
YOU can fight yeast infection with symptoms that include a weakened immune system, constipation, diarrhea, headaches, bad breath, rectal itching, impotence, mood swings, memory loss, canker sores, heartburn, acne, night sweats, itching, stopped-up sinuses, burning tongue, white spots in the mouth, white spots on the tongue, vaginitis, kidney problems, bladder infections, mood swings, depression, fatigue, arthritis, adrenal exhaustion, hyperactivity, hypothyroidism, diabetes with these herbs from Mother Nature’s medicine chest:

Coral calcium with trace minerals, maitake mushroom, garlic extract, pau d’arco, una de gato extract, quercetin.

Prevention:
Avoid persistent and excessive moisture in the genital area by wearing underwear or pantyhose with cotton crotches, and loose fitting slacks. Avoid wearing wet bathing suits or exercise clothing for long periods of time, and wash them after each use.

Supplement Recommendations:
Vitamin C
Dosage: 1,000 mg 3 times a day.
Comments: Reduce dose if diarrhea develops.

Echinacea
Dosage: 200 mg 3 times a day.
Comments: Use in a cycle of 3 weeks on, 1 week off, for recurrent infections; standardized to contain at least 3.5% echinacosides.

Acidophilus
Dosage: 1 pill twice a day orally or as a suppository.
Comments: Get 1-2 billion live (viable) organisms per pill. Can insert oral pill into vagina; discontinue after 5 days.

Bifidus
Dosage: 1 pill twice a day.
Comments: Use a supplement that contains 1-2 billion live (viable) organisms per pill.

FOS
Dosage: 2,000 mg twice a day.
Comments: Use in combination with acidophilus and bifidus.

Tea Tree Oil
Dosage: Insert suppository into vagina every 12 hours for 5 days.
Comments: Available in health-food stores.

Vitamin A/Calendula
Dosage: Insert suppository into vagina every 12 hours for 5 days.
Comments: Available in health-food stores.

Click to learn more about Vaginitis

Natural Yeast Infection Remedies Are Perfect Yeast Fighters

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Vaginal yeast infection

Cure East Infection Holestically

Ayurvedic Treatment Of East Infection

Homeopathic Medicine for East Infection
MotherNature.com – Yeast Infection

Alternative remedies for Yeast Infection And Other Forms of VaginitisÂ

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

 

Sources:
Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs,
www.healthline.com
http://www.herbnews.org/candidiasisdone.htm

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