Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Repetitive strain injury(RSI)

Alternative Names:Repetitive stress injury, Repetitive motion injuries, Repetitive motion disorder (RMD), Cumulative trauma disorder (CT), Occupational overuse syndrome, Overuse syndrome, Regional musculoskeletal disorder

Definition:

Repetitive strain injury (RSI)  is an injury of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems that may be caused by repetitive tasks, forceful exertions, vibrations, mechanical compression (pressing against hard surfaces), or sustained or awkward positions.

The term “repetitive strain injury” is most commonly used to refer to patients in whom there is no discrete, objective, pathophysiology that corresponds with the pain complaints. It may also be used as an umbrella term incorporating other discrete diagnoses that have (intuitively but often without proof) been associated with activity-related arm pain such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, DeQuervain’s syndrome, stenosing tenosynovitis/trigger finger/thumb, intersection syndrome, golfer’s elbow (medial epicondylosis), tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis), and focal dystonia.

click to see pictures…..(0)....(1).…...(2)….….(3)

Finally RSI is also used as an alternative or an umbrella term for other non-specific illnesses or general terms defined in part by unverifiable pathology such as reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS), Blackberry thumb, disputed thoracic outlet syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, “gamer’s thumb” (a slight swelling of the thumb caused by excessive use of a gamepad), “Rubik’s wrist” or “cuber’s thumb” (tendinitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, or other ailments associated with repetitive use of a Rubik’s Cube for speedcubing), “stylus finger” (swelling of the hand caused by repetitive use of mobile devices and mobile device testing.), “raver’s wrist”, caused by repeated rotation of the hands for many hours (for example while holding glow sticks during a rave).

Although tendinitis and tenosynovitis are discrete pathophysiological processes, one must be careful because they are also terms that doctors often use to refer to non-specific or medically unexplained pain, which they theorize may be caused by the aforementioned processes.

Doctors have also begun making a distinction between tendinitis and tendinosis in RSI injuries. There are significant differences in treatment between the two, for instance in the use of anti-inflammatory medicines, but they often present similar symptoms at first glance and so can easily be confused.

Types of RSIs that affect computer users may include non-specific arm pain or work related upper limb disorder (WRULD). Conditions such as RSI tend to be associated with both physical and psychosocial stressors.

Symptoms:

The following complaints are typical in patients who might receive a diagnosis of RSI:

*Short bursts of excruciating pain in the arm, back, shoulders, wrists, hands, or thumbs (typically diffuse – i.e. spread over many areas).

*The pain is worse with activity.

*Weakness, lack of endurance.

In contrast to carpal tunnel syndrome, the symptoms tend to be diffuse and non-anatomical, crossing the distribution of nerves, tendons, etc. They tend not to be characteristic of any discrete pathological condition.

1.The users experience constant pain in the hands, elbows, shoulders, neck, and the back. Other symptoms of Repetitive Stain Injury are cramps, tingling, and numbness in the hands. The hand movements of the user may become clumsy and the person may find it difficult even to fasten buttons.

2.Another variant of Repetitive Strain Injury is that, it may produce painful symptoms in the upper limbs, but the site may be difficult to locate.

3.The common diagnoses seen in Repetitive Strain Injury are Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Tenosynovitis, Bursitis, White Limb, and Shoulder pain. A major cause is due to long unbroken periods of work. Ergonomics or the lack of it plays a very important role. Lack of information about the condition leads to neglect by the concerned individuals.

Frequency :A 2008 study showed that 68% of UK workers suffered from some sort of RSI, with the most common problem areas being the back, shoulders, wrists, and hands.

Physical examination and diagnostic testing; The physical examination discloses only tenderness and diminished performance on effort-based tests such as grip and pinch strength—no other objective abnormalities are present. Diagnostic tests (radiological, electrophysiological, etc.) are normal. In short, RSI is best understood as an apparently healthy arm that hurts. Whether there is currently undetectable damage remains to be established.

Causes:

RSI is believed by many to be caused due to lifestyle without ergonomic care,  E.g. While working in front of computers, driving, traveling etc. Simple reasons like ‘Using a blunt knife for everyday chopping of vegetables’, may cause RSI.

Repetitive Strain Injury occurs when the movable parts of the limbs are injured. Repetitive Strain Injury usually caused due to repetitive tasks, incorrect posture, stress and bad ergonomics. Repetitive Strain Injury generally causes numbness, tingling, weakness, stiffing, and swelling and even nerve damage. The chief complaint is the constant pain in the upper limbs, neck, shoulder and back.

The main cause of this main are the repetitive activities, forceful activities of arms and hand and awkward postures. The other causes of Repetitive Strain Injuries are sitting in a fixed posture and poor workplace ergonomics.

Other typical habits that some sources believe lead to RSI

*Reading or doing tasks for extended periods of time while looking down.

*Sleeping on an inadequate bed/mattress or sitting in a bad armchair and/or in an uncomfortable position.

*Carrying heavy items.

*Holding one’s phone between neck and shoulder.

*Watching TV in incorrect position e.g. Too much to the left/right.

*Sleeping with head forward, while traveling.

*Prolonged use of the hands, wrists, back, neck, etc.

*Sitting in the same position for a long period of time.

Diagnosis:

Repetitive task and stress affects the body parts causes RSI. An instance of this is using a screwdriver, if you keep using the screwdriver without a break, you feel your wrist become restricted and you feel pain and you may also experience the loss of movement. This is the initial stage of RSI.

RSI, or should we say the group of syndromes that make up repetitive strain injury only affects the back, neck and arms. A lot of people without even realizing may suffer with RSI.

You may have had pains in your wrists or arms that you explained as being tired if you are working on an assembly line or you’re an avid musician who can’t put their guitar down. These pains are more than likely the initial RSI symptoms.

Judging the Symptom:

The problem in diagnosing repetitive strain injury is the fact that is can be hard to judge the symptoms, after all RSI is just a name given to a group of different conditions that are all related in some way to the affects we attribute to RSI.

Not only do we have this issue, we also have the problem that some of the symptoms related with repetitive strain injury are found in other, more dangerous conditions such as angina.

Even though RSI only affects the upper torso and limbs, the symptoms can in fact appear in the lower half of the body; this is due to the vertebral nerves that can be affected in some cases so the pains appear in the legs.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome:

Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common out of all the syndromes that make up the condition called RSI.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition that affects the median nerve situated in the carpal canal in the wrist, when the same movement is carried out frequently it can cause the tendons also situated in the carpal canal to become inflamed and compress the nerve causing pain and tightness causing loss of movement.

The most famous out of all the syndromes that make up repetitive stress injury is carpal tunnel syndrome because it affects a lot of people who spend long periods on the computer without supporting their wrists appropriately.

Other Conditions:

There are some conditions that the every day layman may be aware of golfers elbow, which is called medial epicondylitis, or like tennis elbow, which is officially called lateral epicondylitis.

You should visit your doctor if you suffer with pains, aches, stiffness, numbness or tingling sensations in your back, arms, wrists or hands. While RSI is not life threatening it can affect you more than you think.

Eventually without visiting a medical professional the symptoms can become ever worse, or you may even find the RSI could be something more risky. Learn more about ergonomics at safecomputingtips.com.

Treatment :
Most common and simple measure of treatment, which is more common sense than anything is painkillers and anti inflammatory pills, these are available over the counter at any good pharmacy.When taking painkillers and anti inflammatory pills it is important that you rest the affected area, just because the pain is not there it doesn’t mean the condition has instantly been resolved.Another simple measure is speaking to your employer, you may find they have guidelines to work towards that may mean you can get some support in alleviating your condition. This means your work place may be assessed and improvements implemented.You can get a simple support bandage from your local pharmacy to help add strength to the affected area, if it is your wrist or arm. You may need to purchase a special keyboard and/or mouse or get speech recognition software in order to prevent further irritation to your injury.Speech recognition software is a great alternative for those who suffer due to computer work, speech recognition software works by the software writing what you say for you.Your medical professional might possibly prescribe that you wear an orthopedic hand brace. You don’t want to wear one of these if your doctor doesn’t. it because it could lead to further injury.Therapy:Your doctor may prescribe physical therapy, a physical therapists role is to develop and maximize the movement of the body, and this can also include the provision of aids to alleviate symptoms.

Another prescribed therapy your doctor may request is occupational therapy, it may sound like occupational therapy and physical therapy are very similar but there are differences.

Occupational therapy helps develop and maintain the skills required to carry out all the general functions needed to live a comfortable life.

Occupational therapy includes assessing what a persons requirements are and supporting them with offering recommendations on adapting to their living or working space and offering simple exercises to regain movement.

Alternative Treatment:

Deep body massages have been reported to work wonders for those suffering with repetitive strain injury as it works deep into the body’s soft tissues like the muscles and tendons where the pain comes from.

Soft tissue therapy is a type of therapy that works by decompressing the area surrounding the RSI. This will increase your circulation and aid in healing. They may also try biofeedback. This is generally used to reduce tension in the muscles in your shoulders and neck.

Some people have reported that slow martial arts like Tai Chi can have a dramatic affect on their condition because they work on specific movements and improve strength and flexibility.

Surjury:

As a last resort, the medical professional might recommend to have surgery. one should keep in mind that it doesn’t always work and he or she  will be left without the use of one’s hand and arm for a long time. The above treatment methods have been proven to help heal even the worst types of RSI disorders when they are done correctly.

You may click to see the using of modern ergonomics in home office

Exercise:

Exercise decreases the risk of developing RSI.

*Doctors sometimes recommend that RSI sufferers engage in specific strengthening exercises, for example to improve posture.

*In light of the fact that a lifestyle that involves sitting at a computer for extended periods of time increases the probability that an individual will develop excessive kyphosis, theoretically the same exercises that are prescribed for thoracic outlet syndrome or kyphotic postural correction would benefit an RSI sufferer.

*Some sources[who?] recommend motoric exercises and ergo-aerobics to decrease chances of strain injury. Ergo-aerobics target touch typists and people who often use computer keyboard.

Resuming normal activities despite the pain:

Psychologists Tobias Lundgren and Joanne Dahl have asserted that, for the most difficult chronic RSI cases, the pain itself becomes less of a problem than the disruption to the patient’s life caused by

*avoidance of pain-causing activities

*the amount of time spent on treatment

They claim greater success from teaching patients psychological strategies for accepting the pain as an ongoing fact of life, enabling them to cautiously resume many day-to-day activities and focus on aspects of life other than RSI

Psychosocial factors:

Studies have related RSI and other upper extremity complaints with psychological and social factors. A large amount of psychological distress showed doubled risk of the reported pain, while job demands, poor support from colleagues, and work dissatisfaction also showed an increase in pain, even after short term exposure.

For example, the association of Carpal tunnel syndrome with arm use is commonly assumed but not well-established. Typing has long been thought to be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, but recent evidence suggests that, if anything, typing may be protective. Another study claimed that the primary risk factors for Carpal tunnel syndrome were “being a woman of menopausal age, obesity or lack of fitness, diabetes or having a family history of diabetes, osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, smoking, and lifetime alcohol intake.
Prevention:
Risk of RSI can be reduced a lot by warming up and cooling down the muscles used, taking regular breaks throughout the day, having an appropriate workstation and seating position, and practising relaxation. If the job puts one  at risk of RSI he or she should seek out expert advice on prevention from your employer or professional body.

Repetitive Stress Injury symptoms when found, people should seek medical attention as early as possible. Measures that can be adopted to avoid Repetitive Stress Injury at an individual level include:
Position: The recommended position to sit in front of a computer is semi-reclined with the forearms resting in a cradle or on an extension of the keyboard support to prevent Repetitive Stress Injury.

There should be ample support for the back. The hands should be free and point in the direction of the forearms. The feet should rest on the ground or feet support. The distance of the monitor should be 18 inches or more and at a slightly lower level than the eye level. Using these measures Repetitive Stress Injury caused out of position can be avoided.

Hydration: The Repetitive Stress Injury can be prevented by drinking adequate fluids to keep the tendons and soft- tissues soft.

Shortcuts: Using keyboard shortcuts and less of mouse is the most effective preventive method to avoid Repetitive Stress Injury. Touch the ergonomic keyboard softly and do not pound at it. The wrist should rest on the table or wrist rest.

Telephone use: Don’t cradle the telephone between the face and shoulder while working, as this can lead to neck strain.

Messages: Don’t use the computer while conveying messages in person or through the intercom.

No games:One of the main Causes of Repetitive Stress Injury is Games. Games or surfing at work may increase stress on your hands. So games should be avoided.

Preventive Measures at the Organizational Level for Repetitive Stress injury :
Organizations that use computers in a big way can also adopt certain preventive measures for avoiding Repetitive Strain Injury to their employees. These include:

CLICK & SEE

1.You need to educate your employees on the importance of adopting a proper posture which is one of the main cause of Repetitive Stress Injury.
2.Ensure that all your employees are using quality ergonomic furniture that will save loss of working hours by guaranteeing full comfort of the employees.
3.Give periodic reminders through lectures and audio-visual presentations by medical professionals on the importance of taking good care of health while using computers and Repetitive Stress Injury.
4.Try to avoid computer as much as possible: use voicemail instead of sending e-mail. Go for a walk or watch a movie instead of playing video games. Its better go for a book instead of searching the Web. You are in the danger zone for Repetitve Stress Injury if you are using a computer for as little as two hours a day.
5.Adjust your workstation properly. Make sure your monitor is directly in front of you, with the top of the screen at eye level. Be sure your keyboard (Ergonomic Keyboard) and mouse (Ergonomic Mouse) are low enough to allow you to relax your shoulders.
6.Sit up straight. Make sure your chair supports your spine in an erect position as it is the one of the main causes of Repetitive Stress Injury.
7.Practice proper technique: never rest your wrists on the desk, wrist pad or armrests while you are typing or using a mouse or trackball.
8.Pace yourself. Take a 5-to-10 minute break every 20 minutes and limit your overall time at the computer.
9.Get regular cardiovascular exercise.
10.Do appropriate upper-body strengthening and stretching exercises.
11.Stretch frequently while at the computer.
12.Do not work at the computer or other hand-intensive activities if you are experiencing pain, fatigue or soreness.
13.Avoid using the mouse and trackball whenever possible. Use keystrokes instead for preventing Repetitive Stress Injury.
14.When symptoms of Repetitive Stress Injury are set in, consult an orthopedic surgeon. If you find of the symptoms of Repetitive Stress Injury mentioned above, do not make the diagnosis yourself. The diagnosis will be made from the history and clinical findings as there will be no changes in X-rays, since the soft tissues are involved.

Nerve conduction studies can confirm the diagnosis. In cases detected earlier, attention to ergonomics will restore normalcy.
In cases of Repetitive Stress Injury when diagnosed late, orthopedic treatment like injections and even minor surgery may be necessary.

You may click to see this page for more knowledge

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Related articles

Resources:

English: Untreated Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Image via Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury
http://www.safecomputingtips.com/rsi-diagnosis.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/repetitivestrain1.shtml
http://www.rsiwarrior.com/ergonomics.html
http://www.hoverstop.com/eng/rsi.php

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Amyloidosis

Alternative Names: Amyloid – primary

Definition:
In medicine, amyloidosis refers to a variety of conditions in which amyloid proteins are abnormally deposited in organs and/or tissues. A protein is described as being amyloid if, due to an alteration in its secondary structure, it takes on a particular aggregated insoluble form similar to the beta-pleated sheet.  Symptoms vary widely depending upon the site of amyloid deposition. Amyloidosis may be inherited or acquired.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The collection of these abnormal proteins interferes with the normal functioning of the organ affected.

Since there are more than 20 different proteins that may form amyloid, there are also many different types of amyloidosis.

Classification of amyloid:
The modern classification of amyloid disease tends to use an abbreviation of the protein that makes the majority of deposits, prefixed with the letter A. For example amyloidosis caused by transthyretin is termed “ATTR.” Deposition patterns vary between patients but are almost always composed of just one amyloidogenic protein. Deposition can be systemic (affecting many different organ systems) or organ-specific. Many amyloidoses are inherited, due to mutations in the precursor protein. Other forms are due to different diseases causing overabundant or abnormal protein production – such as with over production of immunoglobulin light chains in multiple myeloma (termed AL amyloid), or with continuous overproduction of acute phase proteins in chronic inflammation (which can lead to AA amyloid).

Out of the approximately 60 amyloid proteins that have been identified so far,  at least 36 have been associated in some way with a human disease.

Amyloidosis is rare, being diagnosed in between one and five in every 100,000 people every year. It’s more common in older people and is also slightly more common in men than in women.

Causes:
The cause of primary amyloidosis is unknown, but the condition is related to abnormal production of antibodies by a type of immune cell called plasma cells.

The symptoms depend on the organs affected by the deposits. These organs can include the tongue, intestines, skeletal and smooth muscles, nerves, skin, ligaments, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys.

Primary amyloidosis can result in conditions that include:

•Carpal tunnel syndrome
•Gastrointestinal reflux (GERD)
•Heart muscle damage (cardiomyopathy)
•Kidney failure
•Malabsorption
The deposits build up in the affected organs, causing them to become stiff, which decreases their ability to function.

Risk factors have not been identified. Primary amyloidosis is rare. It is similar to multiple myeloma, and is treated the same way.

Symptoms:

CLICK & SEE
•Enlarged tongue
•Fatigue
•Irregular heart rhythm
•Numbness of hands and feet
•Shortness of breath
•Skin changes
•Swallowing difficulties
•Swelling in the arms and legs
•Weak hand grip
•Weight loss

Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
•Clay-colored stools
•Decreased urine output
•Diarrhea
•Hoarseness or changing voice
•Joint pain
•Other tongue problems
•Weakness

CLICK TO SEE THE STAGES

Diagnosis:
Exams and Tests
Your doctor may discover that you have an enlarged liver or spleen.

If specific organ damage is suspected, your doctor may order tests to confirm amyloidosis of that organ. For example:

•Abdominal ultrasound may reveal a swollen liver or spleen.
•An abdominal fat pad biopsy, rectal mucosa biopsy, or a bone marrow biopsy can help confirm the diagnosis.
•A heart evaluation, including an ECG,may reveal arrhythmias, abnormal heart sounds, or signs of congestive heart failure. An echocardiogram shows poor motion of the heart wall, due to a stiff heart muscle.
•A carpal tunnel syndrome evaluation may show that hand grips are weak.Nerve conduction velocity shows abnormalities.
•Kidney function tests may show signs of kidney failure or too much protein in the urine ( nephrotic syndrome).
?BUN level is increased.
?Serum creatinine is increased.
?Urinalysis shows protein, casts, or fat bodies.

This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:
•Bence-Jones protein (quantitative)
•Carpal tunnel biopsy
•Gum biopsy
•Immunoelectrophoresis – serum
•Myocardial biopsy
•Nerve biopsy
•Quantitative immunoglobulins
•Tongue biopsy
•Urine protein

Treatment:
It isn’t always easy to treat amyloidosis, and there is no treatment yet that specifically targets the amyloid depositing in the tissues. In cases where it’s secondary to another problem (AA amyloidosis), such as rheumatoid arthritis, treating that original problem may stop the progress of amyloidosis or may even reverse it.

In cases of primary amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis), chemotherapy drugs may be given to suppress production of new amyloid and cause regression of existing amyloid deposits.

In secondary amyloidosis, aggressive treatment of the underlying disease can improve symptoms and/or slow progression of disease. Complications such as heart failure, kidney failure, and other problems can sometimes be treated as necessary.

Occasionally, transplantation of a damaged organ is necessary. However, even after this has been carried out the new organ may become affected by amyloidosis.

Treatment may also be aimed at supporting the function of damaged tissues and treating complications such as heart or kidney failure.

Overall, many types of amyloidosis follow a steadily progressive course and may prove fatal within a year or two.

Prognosis :
The severity of the disease depends upon the organs affected. Heart and kidney involvement may lead to organ failure and death. Systemic involvement is associated with death within 1 to 3 years.

Possible Complications:
•Congestive heart failure
•Death
•Endocrine failure (hormonal disorder)
•Kidney failure
•Respiratory failure

Prevention : There is no known prevention.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/amyloidosis1.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000533.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amyloidosis

http://health.allrefer.com/pictures-images/amyloidosis-on-the-face.html

http://health.allrefer.com/health/cardiac-amyloidosis-dilated-cardiomyopathy.html

http://morningreporttgh.blogspot.com/2010/04/amyloidosis.html

http://gsm.utmck.edu/research/HICP/overview.cfm

http://www.pathologyatlas.ro/amyloidosis-kidney-pathology.php

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Raynaud’s disease

Definition:-
Raynaud’s disease is a condition that causes some areas of your body — such as your fingers, toes, tip of your nose and your ears — to feel numb and cool in response to cold temperatures or stress. In Raynaud’s disease, smaller arteries that supply blood to your skin narrow, limiting blood circulation to affected areas.

Click to see the pictures of  Raynaud’s  diseas

Raynaud’s disease (also known as “Primary Raynaud’s phenomenon” where the phenomenon is idiopathic, and Raynaud’s syndrome (secondary Raynaud’s), where it is caused by some other instigating factor. Measurement of hand-temperature gradients is one tool used to distinguish between the primary and secondary forms.

It is possible for the primary form to progress to the secondary form.

Symptoms:-
Raynaud’s disease is more than simply having cold hands and cold feet, and it’s not the same as frostbite. Signs and symptoms of Raynaud’s depend on the frequency, duration and severity of the blood vessel spasms that underlie the disorder.

The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Raynaud’s phenomenon includes the 51 symptoms listed below:

•Symptoms usually affect fingers, toes, nose, lips or earlobes
•Skin color changes
•Skin whiteness then blueness then redness
•Cold sensitivity
•Pallor (whiteness)
•Cyanosis (blueness)
•Redness (rubor)
•Finger symptoms
*Finger color changes
*Finger pallor
*Finger tingling
*Finger redness
*Finger numbness
*Finger sensitivity
*Finger pain

•Toe symptoms

*Toe color changes
*Toe numbness
*Toe redness
*Toe pallor
*Toe sensitivity
*Toe pain

•Nose symptoms
*Nose color changes
*Nose numbness
*Nose redness
*Nose pallor
*Nose sensitivity
*Nose pain

•Earlobe symptoms
*Earlobe color changes
*Earlobe numbness
*Earlobe redness
*Earlobe pallor
*Earlobe pain
•Lip symptoms

*Lip color changes
*Lip numbness
*Lip redness
*Lip pallor
*Lip sensitivity
*Lip pain

•Episodic attacks – lasting minutes or hours
•Small blood vessel constriction (vasospastic attacks)
•Symmetric symptoms – usually both hands or both feet rather than just one
•Both hands and both feet – primary Raynaud’s affects all 4; secondary Raynaud’s typically affects either hands or feet but not both.

•Other areas affected – hands and feet most common but others are possible
*Nose symptoms
*Lips symptoms
*Ear lobes symptoms

Causes:-
Doctors don’t completely understand the cause of Raynaud’s attacks, but blood vessels in the hands and feet appear to overreact to cold temperatures or stress:

*Cold temperatures. When your body is exposed to cold temperatures, your extremities lose heat. Your body slows down blood supply to your fingers and toes to preserve your body’s core temperature. Your body specifically reduces blood flow by narrowing the small arteries under the skin of your extremities. In people with Raynaud’s, this normal response is exaggerated.
*Stress. Stress causes a similar reaction to cold in the body, and likewise the body’s response may be exaggerated in people with Raynaud’s.


Blood vessels in spasm
:
With Raynaud’s, arteries to your fingers and toes go into what’s called vasospasm. This narrows your vessels dramatically and temporarily limits blood supply. Over time, these same small arteries may also thicken slightly, further limiting blood flow. The result is that affected skin turns a pale and dusky color due to the lack of blood flow to the area. Once the spasms go away and blood returns to the area, the tissue may turn red before returning to a normal color.

Cold temperatures are most likely to trigger an attack. Exposure to cold can be as simple as putting your hands under a faucet of running cold water, taking something out of the freezer or exposure to cold air. For some people, exposure to cold temperatures isn’t necessary. Emotional stress alone can cause an episode of Raynaud’s.

Raynaud’s may be partly an inherited disorder.

In extreme cases, the secondary form can progress to necrosis or gangrene of the fingertips.

Raynaud’s phenomenon is an exaggeration of vasomotor responses to cold or emotional stress. More specifically, it is a hyperactivation of the sympathetic system causing extreme vasoconstriction of the peripheral blood vessels, leading to tissue hypoxia. Chronic, recurrent cases of Raynaud phenomenon can result in atrophy of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and muscle. In rare cases it can cause ulceration and ischemic gangrene.

It is important to distinguish Raynaud’s disease from syndrome. In order to diagnose these two forms of Raynaud’s, a doctor may look for signs of arthritis or vasculitis, and may conduct a number of laboratory tests.

Primary Raynaud’s (disease):
Raynaud’s disease, or “Primary Raynaud’s”, is diagnosed if the symptoms are idiopathic, that is, they occur by themselves and not in association with other diseases. Some refer to Primary Raynaud’s disease as “being allergic to coldness”. It often develops in young women in their teens and early adulthood. Primary Raynaud’s is thought to be at least partly hereditary, although specific genes have not yet been identified.

Smoking worsens frequency and intensity of attacks, and there is a hormonal component. Caffeine also worsens the attacks. Sufferers are more likely to have migraine and angina than controls.

Secondary Raynaud’s (syndrome)
:
Raynaud’s syndrome, or “Secondary Raynaud’s”, occurs secondary to a wide variety of other conditions. Secondary Raynaud’s has a number of associations:

Connective tissue disorders:
*scleroderma
*systemic lupus erythematosus
*rheumatoid arthritis
*Sjögren’s syndrome
*dermatomyositis
*polymyositis
*mixed connective tissue disease

*cold agglutinin disease

*Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Eating disorders
*anorexia nervosa

Obstructive disorders :
*atherosclerosis
*Buerger’s disease
*Takayasu’s arteritis
*subclavian aneurysms
*thoracic outlet syndrome


Drugs
:
*Beta-blockers
*cytotoxic drugs – particularly chemotherapeutics and most especially *bleomycin
*ciclosporin
*ergotamine
*sulfasalazine
*anthrax vaccines whose primary ingredient is the Anthrax Protective Antigen


Occupation
:
*jobs involving vibration, particularly drilling
*exposure to vinyl chloride, mercury
*exposure to the cold (e.g. by working packing frozen food)


Others
:
*hypothyroidism
*cryoglobulinemia
*malignancy
*reflex sympathetic dystrophy
*carpal tunnel syndrome
*Magnesium Deficiency
*Erythromelalgia, (the opposite of Raynaud’s, with hot and warm extremities) often co-exists in patients with Raynaud’s)
It is important to realize that Raynaud’s can herald these diseases by periods of more than 20 years in some cases, making it effectively their first presenting symptom. This can be the case in the CREST syndrome, of which Raynaud’s is a part.

Patients with Secondary Raynaud’s can also have symptoms related to their underlying diseases. Raynaud’s phenomenon is the initial symptom that presents for 70% of patients with scleroderma, a skin and joint disease.

Raynaud’s phenomenon which is limited to one hand (or to one foot) is referred to as Unilateral Raynaud’s. This is an uncommon form, and it is always secondary to local or regional vascular disease. It commonly progresses within several years to affect other limbs as the vascular disease progresses.

Risk factors:-
Risk factors for primary Raynaud’s include:

*Your gender.
Primary Raynaud’s affects women more than men.
*Your age. Although anyone can develop the condition, primary Raynaud’s often begins between the ages of 15 and 30.
*Where you live. The disorder is also more common in people who live in colder climates.
*Your family history. Additionally, a family history appears to increase your risk of primary Raynaud’s. About one-third of people with primary Raynaud’s have a first-degree relative — a parent, sibling or child — with the disorder.

Risk factors for secondary Raynaud’s include:


*Associated diseases.
These include conditions such as scleroderma and lupus.

*Certain occupations. People in occupations that cause repetitive trauma, such as workers who operate tools that vibrate, also may be more vulnerable to secondary Raynaud’s.

*Exposure to certain substances.
Smoking, medications that affect the blood vessels and exposure to chemicals such as vinyl chloride are associated with an increased risk of Raynaud’s.
Complications:
If Raynaud’s is severe — which is rare — blood circulation to your fingers or toes could permanently diminish, causing deformities of your fingers or toes.

If an artery to an affected area becomes blocked completely, sores (skin ulcers) or dead tissue (gangrene) may develop. Ulcers and gangrene can be difficult to treat.

Diagnosis:-
Examinations & Tests:
To diagnose Raynaud’s, your doctor will ask detailed questions about your symptoms and medical history and conduct a physical examination. Your doctor may also run tests to rule out other medical problems that may cause similar signs and symptoms, such as a pinched nerve.

Your doctor may perform a simple test called a cold-stimulation test during your office visit. This test may involve placing your hands in cool water or exposing you to cold air, to trigger an episode of Raynaud’s.

A careful medical history will often reveal whether the condition is primary or secondary. Once this has been established, an examination is largely to identify or exclude possible secondary causes.

Digital artery pressure: pressures are measured in the arteries of the fingers before and after the hands have been cooled. A decrease of at least 15 mmHg is diagnostic (positive).

Doppler ultrasound: to assess blood flow.

Full blood count: this can reveal a normocytic anaemia suggesting the anaemia of chronic disease or renal failure.

Blood test for urea and electrolytes:
this can reveal renal impairment.
Thyroid function tests: this can reveal hypothyroidism.
An autoantibody screen, tests for rheumatoid factor, Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, which may reveal specific causative illnesses or a generalised inflammatory process.
Nail fold vasculature: this can be examined under the microscope

Sorting out primary vs. secondary Raynaud’s
:
To distinguish between primary and secondary Raynaud’s, your doctor may perform an in-office test called nail fold capillaroscopy. During the test, the doctor examines your nail fold — the skin at the base of your fingernail — under a microscope. Tiny blood vessels (capillaries) near the nail fold that are enlarged or deformed may indicate an underlying disease. However, some secondary diseases can’t be detected by this test.

If your doctor suspects that another condition, such as an autoimmune or connective tissue disease, underlies Raynaud’s, he or she may order blood tests, such as:

*Antinuclear antibodies test. A positive test for the presence of these antibodies — produced by your immune system — indicates a stimulated immune system and is common in people who have connective tissue diseases or other autoimmune disorders.

*Erythrocyte sedimentation rate. This blood test determines the rate at which red blood cells settle to the bottom of a tube in the space of an hour. A faster than normal rate may signal an underlying inflammatory or autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases are commonly associated with secondary Raynaud’s.
There’s no single blood test to diagnose Raynaud’s. Your doctor may order other tests, such as those that rule out diseases of the arteries, to help pinpoint a disease or condition that may be associated with Raynaud’s.

Modern Treatments and drugs:-

Treatment options are dependent on the type of Raynaud’s present. Raynaud’s syndrome is treated primarily by addressing the underlying cause, but includes all options for Raynaud’s disease as well. Treatment of primary Raynaud’s focuses on avoiding triggers.

General care:
*Avoid environmental triggers, e.g. cold, vibration, etc. Emotional stress is another recognized trigger; although the various sources of stress can not all be avoided, it is possible to learn healthier, more effective ways of dealing with them, which will reduce stress and its damaging physical effects overall.

*Keep your hands, feet and head warm—especially your fingers, toes, ears and nose—by wearing mittens, insulated footwear, a ski mask; by using hand and foot warmers, etc.

*Quit smoking.

*Avoid caffeine and other stimulants and vasoconstrictors that have not been prescribed to you by your doctor. Read product labels; caffeine is found not only in coffee and tea, stay-awake pills, many soft drinks and candies, but also in some cosmetics, soaps and shampoos(reference needed).

  • Exercise. Your doctor may encourage you to exercise regularly, particularly if you have primary Raynaud’s. Exercise can increase circulation, among other health benefits.
  • Control stress. Because stress may trigger an attack, learning to recognize and avoid stressful situations may help control the number of attacks.

*Make sure all your doctors know about all the medicines you take and about all the OTC remedies you use, especially hormones and drugs that regulate hormones, such as hormonal contraception, so that these professionals can make an assessment of your chemical regimen and make any changes that may be indicated. Contraception which is low in estrogen is preferable, and the progesterone only pill is often prescribed for women with Raynaud’s.

*If you are diabetic, follow your diabetes treatment plan.

Emergency measures:
*If white finger (Raynaud’s) occurs unexpectedly and a source of warm water is available, allow tepid to slightly warm water to run over the affected digits while you gently massage the area. Continue this process until the white area returns to its normal, healthy color.

*If triggered by exposure in a cold environment, and no warm water is available, place the affected digits in a warm body cavity – arm pit, crotch, or even in the mouth. Keep the affected area warm at least until the whiteness returns to its normal, healthy color. Get out of the cold as soon as possible.

Drug therapy
:
*Treatment for Raynaud’s phenomenon may include prescription medicines that dilate blood vessels, such as calcium channel blockers (nifedipine) or diltiazem.  It has the usual common side effects of headache, flushing, and ankle edema; but these are not typically of sufficient severity to require cessation of treatment.

*There is some evidence that Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (often Losartan) reduce frequency and severity of attacks,and possibly better than nifedipine.

*Alpha-1 adrenergic blockers such as prazosin can be used to control Raynaud’s vasospasms under supervision of a health care provider.

*In a study published in the November 8, 2005 issue of Circulation, sildenafil (Viagra) improved both microcirculation and symptoms in patients with secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon resistant to vasodilatory therapy. The authors, led by Dr Roland Fries (Gotthard-Schettler-Klinik, Bad Schönborn, Germany), report: “In the present study, capillary blood flow was severely impaired and sometimes hardly detectable in patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon. Sildenafil led to a more than 400% increase of flow velocity.”

*Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and other antidepressant medications may reduce the frequency and severity of episodes if caused mainly by psychological stress.

Surgical Intervention
:
*In severe cases, a sympathectomy   procedure can be performed. Here, the nerves that signal the blood vessels of the fingertips to constrict are surgically cut. Microvascular surgery of the affected areas is another possible therapy. Infusions of prostaglandins, e.g. prostacyclin, may be tried, with amputation in exceptionally severe cases.

*A more recent treatment for severe Raynaud’s is the use of Botox. The 2009 article studied 19 patients ranging in age from 15 to 72 years with severe Raynaud’s phenomenon of which 16 patients (84%) reported pain reduction at rest. 13 patients reported immediate pain relief, 3 more had gradual pain reduction over 1-2 months. All 13 patients with chronic finger ulcers healed within 60 days. Only 21% of the patients required repeated injections. A 2007 article describes similar improvement in a series of 11 patients. All patients had significant relief of pain.

Sometimes in cases of severe Raynaud’s, approaches other than medications may be a treatment option:

*Nerve surgery
. Nerves called sympathetic nerves in your hands and feet control the opening and narrowing of blood vessels in your skin. Sometimes it’s necessary in cases of severe Raynaud’s to cut these nerves to interrupt their exaggerated response. Through small incisions in the affected hands or feet, a doctor strips away these tiny nerves around the blood vessels. The surgery, called sympathectomy, may reduce the frequency and duration of attacks, but it’s not always successful.
*Chemical injection. Doctors can inject chemicals to block sympathetic nerves in affected hands or feet. You may need to have the procedure repeated if symptoms return or persist.
*Amputation. Sometimes, doctors need to remove tissue damaged from a lack of blood supply. This may include amputating a finger or toe affected by Raynaud’s in which the blood supply has been completely blocked and the tissue has developed gangrene. But this is rare.


Alternative and Experimental (Research) Approaches
:-
Lifestyle changes and supplements that encourage better circulation may be effective alternatives for managing Raynaud’s. If  one is interested, may talk to the doctor about:

*Biofeedback. Biofeedback — using your mind to control body temperature — may help decrease the severity and frequency of attacks. Biofeedback includes guided imagery to increase the temperature of hands and feet, deep breathing and other relaxation exercises. Your doctor may be able to suggest a therapist who can help you learn biofeedback techniques. Books and tapes also are available on the subject.

*Niacin. Niacin, also known as vitamin B-3, causes blood vessels to dilate, increasing blood flow to skin. Niacin supplements may be useful in treating Raynaud’s, although niacin supplements may have side effects.
*The extract of the Ginkgo biloba leaves (Egb 761, 80 mg) may reduce frequency of attacks.

*Two separate gels combined on the fingertip (somewhat like two-part epoxy, they cannot be combined before use because they will react) increased blood flow in the fingertips by about three times. One gel contained 5% sodium nitrite and the other contained 5% ascorbic acid. The milliliter of combined gel covered an area of ~3 cm². The gel was wiped off after a few seconds.

*Piracetam, a nootropic drug, can be useful as a long-term treatment for vasospastic disorders.

*Arginine, which increase nitrous oxide acts as a vasodilator

*Milder cases of Raynaud’s can often be addressed by biofeedback[23] or other techniques to help control involuntary body functions like skin temperature.

*Fish oil supplements which contain long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may help to control symptoms of primary Raynaud’s. There are few studies in the medical literature dealing with this subject. However, in one 1989 controlled, double-blinded study of 32 patients, consumption of roughly 6.5 grams of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the form of fish oil significantly increased the time to onset or entirely prevented symptoms in response to cold in patients with primary Raynaud’s. Lower doses of fish oil such as may be commonly available from commercial vendors have not been studied and may not be as effective.

Coping with the stress and nuisance of Raynaud’s takes patience and effort. Work with your doctor to manage your condition and maintain a positive attitude. The majority of people with Raynaud’s respond to treatment..

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

 

Rersources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud’s_phenomenon
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/raynauds-disease/DS00433/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies
http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/r/raynauds_phenomenon/symptoms.htm
http://www.myfootshop.com/detail.asp?Condition=Raynauds%20Disease.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Health Quaries

Some Health Quaries & Answers

My wifw eats bricks

Q: When my wife and I visited the Taj Mahal we bought a souvenir, a replica of the Taj made of chalk. It disappeared a few days after we returned. My wife finally confessed to having eaten the whole thing! Then I discovered that she has also been eating uncooked rice and occasionally red bricks too from the housing construction next door. I realise she needs help. Should I go to a psychiatrist?

A: Your wife has “pica”, a craving to eat things not normally considered food. People eat clay, chalk, mud and brick. Pica is an uncontrollable habit, so you’ll have to watch her for some time as she might resort to hiding the fact that she’s still eating non-food items. The urge is uncontrollable even though she knows it is wrong. It is often due to mineral deficiency. It is not a psychiatric problem. Consult a physician. She probably needs antihelminthics (de-worming), and supplements of iron, calcium and zinc.

Doggy pain..

Q: I take my Labrador for a walk in the mornings. He is exuberant, poorly trained and pulls on his leash. Of late I have noticed that my right hand tingles while holding the leash and that this sensation also wakes me up at night. The fingers are often stiff in the morning.

A: Your regular walk probably keeps you fit and provides you with the required amount of exercise. However, if the dog’s personality is as described, you need to take some precautions to prevent injury. Keep the dog on a short leash — holding it firmly at the distance of about one and a half feet, even if the leash is longer. Wear wrist guards and elbow guards. This will prevent injury due to sudden pulls and tugs.

The symptoms you describe sound like “carpal tunnel syndrome” where one of the nerves to the hand is trapped in the ligaments and bones at the wrist. It may have occurred due to injury while controlling the dog. It is better to see an orthopaedic surgeon who specialises in hand injuries.

Measles rash?

Q: My one-year-old son developed fever and the doctor prescribed amoxicillin. After three days of he developed red rashes all over the body. My mother says it is measles but he is immunised.

A: Measles immunisation is given at the age of nine months. At that time antibodies, transferred from the mother through the placenta, are present but waning. If there is a high level of maternal antibodies, the vaccine may not produce a satisfactory response. This is the reason for a booster, which is given as the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine at 15 months. Once this is also given the immunity is almost 100 per cent.

All rashes are not due to measles. Other viral infections can also lead to rashes. Amoxicillin causes non-specific red rashes in some people. Allergies can also cause rashes, in which case there will be associated itching.

Ulcer baby…..

Q: My baby is 10 months old and has developed severe ulcers in the mouth. My doctor says it is due to herpes infection. I always thought that herpes was a sexually transmitted disease.

A: Herpes is the name given to a group of viruses. Different viruses from this group can cause various diseases like chicken pox, ulcers in the mouth or herpes progenitalis. These ulcers are painful. So the baby may find it difficult to swallow. The doctor will usually prescribe some local treatment and antiviral medication.

Although this infection occurs in a large number of children, it is less common in those who are not bottle fed or given pacifiers.

Chikungunya

Q: I had a chikungunya infection about six months ago but my ankles still hurt. I find locomotion difficult as there are sudden attacks of excruciating pain.

A: Unfortunately a chikungunya infection has a long lasting impact in some people. The joint pain either persists or keeps flaring up unexpectedly intermittently for as long as two years. When there is pain apply a capsaicin-containing ointment locally, then place ice on the joint as a cold compress, alternate it with heat from a hot water bottle, have physiotherapy and use analgesics for pain relief.

Sources: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Rheumatism

Definition:
Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the heart, bones, joints, kidney, skin and lung. The study of, and therapeutic interventions in, such disorders is called rheumatology.The term “rheumatism” is still used in colloquial speech and historical contexts, but is no longer frequently used in medical or technical literature; it would be fair to say that there is no longer any recognized disorder simply called “rheumatism.” Some countries use the word Rheumatism to describe fibromyalgia syndrome. The traditional term covers such a range of different problems that to ascribe symptoms to “rheumatism” is not to say very much. Nevertheless, sources dealing with rheumatism tend to focus on arthritis. However, “non-articular rheumatism”, also known as “regional pain syndrome” or “soft tissue rheumatism” can cause just as much discomfort and difficulty. Furthermore, arthritis and rheumatism between them cover at least 200 different conditions.

click & see

Rheumatism is a medical term once frequently used to describe disorders associated with many different parts of the body. Most often, people associate rheumatism with arthritis, or with rheumatic fever, a complication of strep throat that can result in damage to the heart. However, the term rheumatism might apply to the symptoms of numerous conditions that can cause pain and/or weakness.

Some conditions that were once given the general label of rheumatism or called rheumatic diseases include, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, and tendonitis. Frequently autoimmune disorders, since they remained unnamed but caused pain as well as affecting other organs, were classed as rheumatism. Illnesses like lupus were particularly susceptible to being called rheumatism. Later understanding of the actions of these illnesses show that the problem is not dysfunction of the joints, but rather immune systems that can attack joints, muscles and organs.

Some forms of rheumatism are called non-articular rheumatism and may affect the soft tissues causing pain throughout the body. Conditions like tendonitis and fibromyalgia fall into this category. As well, non-articular rheumatism can be localized to specific areas in the body. Bursitis is a non-articular form of rheumatism that affects and inflames the bursa, which are special sacs that protect joints and overlapping muscles. Bursitis most frequently occurs at the site of one joint that may have been injured through overuse.

Other forms of non-articular rheumatism may also result from repetitive motion. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is classed as non-articular rheumatism and is often caused by poor position when typing, or by positional problems when assembling multiple products of the same type.

Another type of non-articular rheumatism is temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ), which only affects the joints in the jaws. Numerous people are treated yearly, to help prevent the mouth from getting stuck when open or closed, or the painful popping and clicking that may be associated with moving the jaws.

The general term rheumatism is seldom heard now in medical communities because health professionals feel that specific naming of illnesses can better point toward standards or treatment and care. Treating lupus is hugely different from treating bursitis or TMJ. With more specified names comes specified research that can help determine a range of information about an illness. Overly general terms lack the specificity required to define the action of a condition, which best directs effective treatment.

Types
The major rheumatic disorders currently recognised include:

* Ankylosing spondylitis
* Back pain…………….CLICK & SEE
* Bursitis/ Tendinitis, Shoulder pain, wrist, biceps, leg, knee (patellar), ankle, hip, and Achilles…CLICK & SEE
* Capsulitis………..…CLICK & SEE
* Fibromyalgia
* Neck pain
* Osteoarthritis
* Psoriatic arthritis
* Rheumatic fever
* Rheumatic heart disease (a long-term complication of Rheumatic fever)
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Systemic lupus erythematosus
* Temporal arteritis and Polymyalgia rheumatica
* Tenosynovitis.

Although these disorders probably have little in common in terms of their epidemiology, they do share two characteristics: they cause chronic (though often intermittent) pain, and they are difficult to treat. They are also, collectively, very common.

Rheumatism symptoms:

Fever, pain, intense soreness and stiffness
The onset of the acute variety of rheumatism is characterized by fever, intense soreness, and pain. In the acute muscular type, the area becomes so sensitive that even the weight of bed clothing aggravates the pain. It may settle into a chronic state under a wrong mode of treatment. If the disease is not treated properly in the acute stage, it may become chronic. The symptoms of chronic muscular rheumatism are pain and stiffness of the affected muscles. In the case of chronic articular rheumatism (pain in the joints), pain and stiffness are felt in one or more joints of the body, with swelling in most cases

Rheumatism causes:

Toxic waste products in the blood
The chief cause of rheumatism is the presence of toxic waste products in the blood. The liberal consumption of meat, white bread, sugar, and refined cereals leaves a large residue of toxic wastes in the system. When the vitality is low, the toxic wastes are concentrated around the joints and bony structure, where they form the basis of rheumatism.

“Rheumatism” and weather

There has long been said to be a link between “rheumatic” pain and the weather. There appears to be no firm evidence in favour or against, but a 1995 questionnaire given to 557 people by A. Naser and others at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Pain Management Center concludes that “changes in barometric pressure are the main link between weather and pain. Low pressure is generally associated with cold, wet weather and an increase in pain. Clear, dry conditions signal high pressure and a decrease in pain

Treatment:
A vast number of traditional herbal remedies were recommended for “rheumatism”. Modern medicine, both conventional and complementary, recognises that the different rheumatic disorders have different causes (and several of them have multiple causes) and require different kinds of treatment.

Nevertheless, initial therapy of the major rheumatological diseases is with analgesics, such as paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), members of which are ibuprofen and diclofenac. Often, stronger analgesics are required.

.

Home Remedies for Rheumatism:

Rheumatism treatment using Potato Juice
The juice of raw potato is regarded as an excellent remedy fur rheumatism. One or two teaspoons of the juice, taken out by pressing mashed raw potatoes, should be taken before meals. This will help to eliminate the toxic condition and relieve rheumatism. The skin of the potato is also an excellent remedy fur rheumatism. The skin is exceptionally rich in vital mineral salts, and the water in which the peelings are boiled is one of the best medicines for ailments caused by excess toxic matter in the system. Approximately thirty grams of the potato peelings should be thoroughly washed and boiled in half a litre of water till it is reduced to half. The decoction should then be strained and a glass of the same should be taken three or four times daily.
Rheumatism treatment using Bitter Gourd
Bitter gourd is considered beneficial in the treatment of rheumatism. A cup of juice, extracted from the vegetable, should be mixed with a teaspoon of honey, and taken daily for treating this condition. This treatment should be continued for at least three months to provide relief
Rheumatism treatment using Celery

Celery is another effective remedy for rheumatism. A fluid extract of the seeds is more powerful than the raw vegetable. This also has a tonic action on the stomach and kidneys. Five to ten drops of this fluid should be taken in hot water before meals. Powdered seeds can be used as a condiment
Rheumatism treatment using Lemon

Lemons are beneficial in the treatment of rheumatism. The patient should take the juice of two or three lemons each day. This will bring good results
Rheumatism treatment using Walnuts

Walnuts are valuable in rheumatism. They should, however, be thoroughly masticated to achieve beneficial results. Half a dozen can be taken daily in the treatment of this condition
Rheumatism treatment using Rhubarb

The herb rhubarb has been found valuable in rheumatism. The green stalks of this herb should be pounded with an equal quantity of sugar. A teaspoonful should be taken three or four times a day. This remedy seldom fails

Other Rheumatism treatment:
Warm-water enema
In the case of acute rheumatism, the bowels should be cleansed daily with a warm-water enema during the first three or four days of the juice fast
Appply heat and hot packs to the affected parts

Other helpful methods in the treatment of rheumatism are application of heat and hot packs to the affected parts, a hot tub bath, a cabinet steam bath, dry friction, and a sponge bath
Hot Epsom salts bath

Hot Epsom salts baths are also beneficial and should be taken twice a week for three months in case of chronic rheumatism and once weekly thereafter. The affected parts should also be bathed twice daily in hot water containing Epsom salts, after which some olive oil should be applied
Fresh air exposure and light outdoor exercises

Fresh air, deep breathing, and light outdoor exercises are also beneficial
Avoid dampness and cold

Dampness and cold should be avoided

Rheumatism diet

Orange juice and water
In the case of acute rheumatism, the patient should be put on a short fast of orange juice and water for three or four days. After the juice fast, the patient should be placed on a restricted diet for fourteen days. In this regimen, orange or grapefruit may be taken for breakfast; lunch may consist of raw salad of seasonal vegetables with raisins, prunes, figs, or dates; and dinner may comprise of one or two steamed vegetables
Well-balanced diet

Thereafter, the patient may gradually adopt a well-balanced diet consisting of seeds, nuts, grains, vegetables, and fruits. In case of chronic rheumatism, the patient may be placed on an all-fruit diet for four or five days. He may, thereafter, gradually adopt a well-balanced diet. The patient should take ripe fruits, fresh vegetables, and buttermilk in abundance
Avoid meat, indigestible and highly-seasoned foods

He should avoid all meat and fish; white bread, sugar, and refined cereals; rich, indigestible and highly-seasoned foods; tea and coffee; alcohol; sauces, pickles, and condiments.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheumatism
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-rheumatism.htm
http://www.home-remedies-for-you.com/remedy/Rheumatism.html

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Symptoms_of_SLE.png

Enhanced by Zemanta