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Herbs & Plants

Clematis recta

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Botanical Name : Clematis recta
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Clematis
Species:C. recta
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Synonyms: Upright Virgin’s Bower. Flammula Jovis

Common Names : Erect Clematis or Ground virginsbower

Habitat: Clematis recta is native to Europe.Growing usually on the margins of woodland areas.
Description:
Clematis recta is a perennial plant, stem about 3 feet high, leafy, striated, herbaceous, greenish or reddish; leaves large opposite, leaflets five to nine pubescent underneath, petioled; flowers, white in upright stiff terminal umbels, peduncles several times ternate; seeds dark brown, smooth, orbicular, much compressed, tails long yellowish, plumose; time for collecting when beginning to flower. It is a free-standing shrub rather than a climbing plant.

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The leaves and flowers have an acrid burning taste, the acridity being greatly diminished by drying.
Cultivation:
Succeeds in any soil in full sun, but prefers a fertile sandy loam. Dislikes poorly-drained heavy clay soils, but grows well in clay if grit is added for drainage. Does well on chalk. Dislikes winter wet. Succeeds in acid as well as alkaline soils. Plans are hardy to about -25°c. A twining plant. The leafstalks wrap themselves around twigs and branches for support. When a side of the stalk touches an object, the growth on that side slows down whilst the other side grows at its normal rate – this causes the leaf stalk to entwine the object it is touching. There are some named forms, selected for their ornamental value. When planting out, in order to avoid the disease ‘clematis wilt’, it is best to plant the rootball about 8cm deeper in the soil. This will also serve to build up a good root crown of growth buds. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Sow stored seed as soon as it is obtained in a cold frame. Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and remove as much of the tail and outer coat as possible. A period of cold stratification is beneficial. The seed germinates in 1 – 9 months or more at 20°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Internodal cuttings of soft to semi-ripe wood, late spring in sandy soil in a frame. Layering of old stems in late winter or early spring. Layering of current seasons growth in early summer.

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Edible Uses: Young shoot tips are cooked and eaten or pickled. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:

The flowers and leaves are diaphoretic, diuretic and rubefacient. They are taken both internally and externally in the treatment of syphilitic, cancerous and other foul ulcers. Caution is advised since this is a poisonous plant. A homeopathic remedy is made from the plant. It is used in the treatment of rheumatism and skin eruptions.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, some if not all members of this genus are mildly poisonous. The toxic principle is dissipated by heat or by drying.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

 Resources:

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/clemat73.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clematis_recta
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Clematis+Recta

 

 

 

 

 

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Herbs & Plants

Clematis occidentalis

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Botanical Name : Clematis occidentalis
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Clematis
Species: C. occidentalis
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ranunculales

Common Name :  western blue virginsbower, Purple clematis

Habitat : Clematis occidentalis is native to much of southern Canada and the northern United States. There are three varieties: var. occidentalis is limited to the eastern half of the species’ range, var. grosseserrata to the western half, and var. dissecta is endemic to Washington.

Description:
The plant varies somewhat in appearance. Generally they produce vines and climb on surfaces. The leaves are divided into three thick, green leaflets, which may have lobes or teeth. The flower has no petals, but petallike sepals which are usually either deep purple-blue in western populations or reddish purple in eastern plants. White flowers are rare.

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Height: vine; stems 3-6 feet long
• Flower size: 1-1/2 to 2 inches long
Flower color: reddish purple
Flowering time: April to June

Medicinal Uses:
A poultice of the pounded, dampened leaves of blue clematis has been applied by the Okanagan-Colville Indians to the feet to treat sweaty feet. They also made a tea of leaves alone or the stems and leaves and used it as a hair wash to prevent gray hair. The Navajo Indians used a cold tea of the plant as a lotion on swollen knees and ankles. The Thompson Indians used the plant as a head wash and to treat scabs and eczema. Most effective when taken at early onset of migraines. Also for cluster and general headaches.
Blackfoot used boiled leaves applied to skin where ‘ghost bullets’ had been removed by shaman; smudge from stem used to revive people who had fainted from being near ‘ghosts’; infusion of plant given to horses as a diuretic.  The Flathead used a decoction of entire plant used as wash for sores and itches, or boiled plant rubbed on affected areas; decoction of stem and leaves used as hair restorer or shampoo, sometimes combined with Pterospora andromedea. Kootenay-infusion used as hair wash, believed to make the hair grow longer.  Montana Indians used a decoction of leaves as a headache remedy; root used as a stimulant to revive fallen race horses.  Okanagan used the leaves and branch mashed and steeped or boiled in water to make a hair wash, said to prevent gray hair; if used every day for a month, said to kill ‘germs’ in hair roots.  Stoney used a wash from stems used as eye wash; feathery achenes used as swabs to stop bleeding.  Thompson used a decoction of plant used as wash for head and neck scabs.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clematis_occidentalis
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CLOCO&photoID=clve3_3h.jpg
http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/clematis_occidentalis.shtml
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

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Categories
Herbs & Plants

Clematis chinensis

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Botanical Name :Clematis chinensis
Family: Ranunculaceae
Subfamily: Ranunculoideae
Tribe: Anemoneae
Genus: Clematis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Synonyms : Clematis minor – Lour.

Common Name :Chinese Clematis

Habitat :E. Asia – C. and W. China.[Japan (including Ryukyu Islands), Vietnam.}  Open woods, hedges, thickets, roadsides and banks of streams

Description:
A decidious Climber growing to 5m by 5m. It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from September to October, and the seeds ripen from October to November. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

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Cultivation:
Prefers a deep moist soil with its roots in the shade and its shoots growing up to the light[164]. Dislikes poorly-drained heavy clay soils, but grows well in clay if grit is added for drainage. Dislikes light sandy soils. Does well on chalk. Succeeds in acid as well as alkaline soils. When planting out, in order to avoid the disease ‘clematis wilt’, it is best to plant the rootball about 8cm deeper in the soil. This will also serve to build up a good root crown of growth buds. A twining plant. The leafstalks wrap themselves around twigs and branches for support. When a side of the stalk touches an object, the growth on that side slows down whilst the other side grows at its normal rate – this causes the leaf stalk to entwine the object it is touching. Plants flower in the autumn on the current season’s growth, any pruning is best carried out in the spring before new growth begins. The flowers are produced quite late in the season and can be damaged by late frosts, so plants generally do better in the milder western parts of the country. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes. The flowers are often damaged by winter cold.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Sow stored seed as soon as it is obtained in a cold frame. Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and remove as much of the tail and outer coat as possible. A period of cold stratification is beneficial. The seed germinates in 1 – 9 months or more at 20°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for the first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Internodal cuttings of soft to semi-ripe wood, late spring in sandy soil in a frame. Layering of old stems in late winter or early spring. Layering of current seasons growth in early summer

Edible Uses: Young shoots – cooked. They are said to be non-toxic in one report but caution is still advised due to reports of toxicity in this genus. It is quite probable that cooking destroys the acrimonious principle, though this is a plant that I have no desire to eat

Medicinal Uses:
Anodyne; Antidote; Antiperiodic; Antirheumatic; Antispasmodic; Antitumor; Cancer; Carminative; Diuretic.

The root is anodyne, antidote, antiperiodic, antispasmodic, carminative, diuretic and sedative[147, 176, 178, 218, 238]. A decoction is taken internally in the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis, tetanus and cold-type stomach-ache[147, 238]. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use[238]. The whole plant is antirheumatic[147, 176, 178, 218]. The plant has a history of folk use in the treatment of cancer[147, 176, 178, 218]. The root contains anemonin, this has antibacterial, analgesic, sedative and antispasmodic actions. It also inhibits the heart and central nervous system and is rubefacient

A decoction of the root is taken internally in the treatment of rheumatism and arthritis, tetanus and cold-type stomach-ache.  The plant has a history of folk use in the treatment of cancer. The root contains anemonin, this has antibacterial, analgesic, sedative and antispasmodic actions. It also inhibits the heart and central nervous system and is rubefacient. 15 g of the drug in decoction with 250g of rice vinegar dissolves fish bones lodged in the throat

Known Hazards : This species is harmful if eaten. The toxic principle is dissipated by heat or by drying. The plant is also a mild skin irritant

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Clematis+chinensis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clematis
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.wm-sec.com/clematis_chinensis.htm
http://www.stevenfoster.com/photography/imageviewsc/clematis/chinensis/cc5_121810/content/Clematis_chinensis_94370_large.html
http://www.fzrm.com/plantextracts/Chinese_Clematis_Root_extract.htm

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