Categories
Herbs & Plants

Scolymus hispanicus

[amazon_link asins=’B00112FHCM’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’e12445a9-849a-11e7-9ba0-9323b158f7d2′]

[amazon_link asins=’B074RKT4N7,8489825866′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’19b81116-849b-11e7-8b30-4308d4197609′]

Botanical Name : Scolymus hispanicus
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Cichorieae
Genus: Scolymus
Species:S. hispanicus
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms: Scolymus hispanicus

Common Names:Spanish Salsify, Common golden thistle or Spanish oyster thistle

Habitat: Scolymus hispanicus is native to southern and western Europe, north to northwestern France. It grows in dry open places.

Description:
Scolymus hispanicus is a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant growing to 80 cm tall, with spiny stems and leaves. The flowerheads are bright yellow to orange-yellow, 2–3 cm diameter. It is in flower in May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation:...Grows well in an ordinary garden soil in sun or semi-shade.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots once they are large enough to handle and plant out in the summer. Seed can also probably be sown in situ. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer

Edible Uses: Coffee; Colouring…..The stalks are eaten raw or boiled. Very popular in almost every province of Spain, where it’s usually eaten in stews during Spring time. It’s also used in salads, soups and with scrambled eggs in Andalusia, Spain, where it is called “tagarnina”. In the sixteenth century in Salamanca, the washed young plants used to be eaten with their root, either raw or in stews with meat.

Medicinal Uses: Since at least the time of Theophrastus in ancient Greece, this plant has been known for medicinal uses. Although it has been cultivated at times, currently most of the plant which is consumed comes from harvesting of wild plant. In ancient medicine the plant was used as a diuretic.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scolymus_hispanicus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Scolymus+hispanicus
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Advertisements
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Celtis laevigata

[amazon_link asins=’B01GRFBL9K,B00MS94VDS,B077NXCTBC,B0767BDPVC,B075PP9K3X,B074Y6J6GY,B01M12T14G,B01M58KFIV,B06XCJ1YP3′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’55e1899a-d9c8-11e7-ada1-cbbc4d64f896′]

Botanical Name: Celtis laevigata
Family: Cannabaceae
Genus: Celtis
Species:C. laevigata
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms :Celtis integrifolia, Celtis mississippiensis.

Common Names: Sugarberry, Hackberry, Southern hackberry, Sugar hackberry, Netleaf hackberry, Texan sugarberry, Sugar Hackberry

Habitat : Celtis laevigata is native to South-eastern N. America – Virginia to Illinois and Missouri, south to Florida and Texas. It grows in rich bottomlands along streams, in flood plains, and on rocky slopes, generally in clay soils, from sea level to 300 metres.
Description:
Celtis laevigata is a deciduous Tree growing to 18 m (59ft 1in) at a medium rate.It also spreads 60.00 to 80.00 feet. The tree is short lived, probably not living more than 150 years. The tree is broad, rounded, open crown of spreading or slightly drooping branches, looking graceful. The deciduous leaves up to 4 inches long, blades ovate to narrower with a long, tapering tip, usually with smooth margins and an unequal base which is tapered on one side of the midrib and rounded on the other. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen in October. Fruit spherical, 1/4 inch in diameter and usually dull red.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.
Cultivation:
Landscape Uses:Erosion control, Pest tolerant, Aggressive surface roots possible, Street tree, Woodland garden. Succeeds in any reasonably good soil, preferring a good fertile well-drained loamy soil. Succeeds on dry gravels and on sandy soils[200]. Plants are usually found on clay soils in the wild. Established plants are very drought resistant. Trees prefer hotter summers and more sunlight than are normally experienced in Britain, they often do not fully ripen their wood when growing in this country and they are then very subject to die-back in winter. A very variable species, according to some botanists these merit varietal status whilst other botanists say that the differences are too slight. Trees are moderate to fast-growing, probably living no more than 125 – 150 years. They can be very long-lived according to another report, perhaps surviving for 1000 years. Trees fruit heavily most years. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus. Special Features:North American native, Naturalizing, Wetlands plant, Attracts butterflies, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed is best given 2 – 3 months cold stratification and then sown February/March in a greenhouse. Germination rates are usually good, though the stored seed might take 12 months or more to germinate. The seed can be stored for up to 5 years. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots. The leaves of seedlings often have a lot of white patches without chlorophyll, this is normal and older plants produce normal green leaves. Grow the seedlings on in a cold frame for their first winter, and plant them out in the following late spring or early summer. Give them some protection from the cold for their first winter outdoors. Cuttings

Edible Uses: ..Fruit – raw or cooked. The flesh is thin, dry and sweetish, covering a single large seed. The fruit, which is orange to brown or red when fully ripe, is 5 – 8mm in diameter.

Medicinal Uses:..…A decoction of the bark has been used in the treatment of sore throats. It has also been used, mixed with powdered shells, as a treatment for VD.

Other Uses : …Wood – soft, not strong, close grained. It weighs 49lb per cubic foot and is used for cheap furniture, fencing and for fuel.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtis_laevigata
http://na.fs.fed.us/pubs/silvics_manual/volume_2/celtis/laevigata.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Celtis+laevigata
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=a857
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CELA

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Symplocos tinctoria

[amazon_link asins=’B003WO0I6C,B06XCKTPY9,B00FKYMASQ’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’18505c00-00cb-11e7-87ff-25e14168bbf2′]

[amazon_link asins=’B01MG4RCS1′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’f5286bc7-00ca-11e7-806d-81e7d919b259′]

Botanical Name : Symplocos tinctoria
Family: Symplocaceae
Genus: Symplocos
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms: Woodland Garden Secondary; Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade; Shady Edge;

Common Names: Sweet Leaf, Common sweetleaf, Horse-sugar, Horsesugar

Habitat : Symplocos tinctoria is native to South-eastern N. America – Florida to Arkansas, north to Delaware.
It grows in woods, swamps and bottomlands. Rich moist soils, often in the shade of dense forests.

Description:
Symplocos tinctoria is an evergreen Shrub growing to 8 m (26ft 3in).Leaves are 3 to 6 in. alternate simple, lustrous dark green leaves; some leaves may remain until spring.Flowers are compact cluster of yellow to cream fluffy flowers in early spring on previous years growth; fragrant; orange to brown fruit. It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen in September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)The plant is not self-fertile.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Edible Uses:
Leaves – raw. Thick and downy, they have a pleasant sweet smell and taste. Chewed for their pleasantly sweet, slightly acid flavour that is refreshing and helps to ease thirst.

Medicinal Uses :

Febrifuge; Tonic.

The bitter, aromatic roots have been used as a tonic. A decoction of the scraped roots has been used in the treatment of fevers.

Other Uses:... Dye; Mordant; Wood.
A yellow dye is obtained from the leaves, the bark and the fruits. We have no specific information for this species but many species in this genus contain alum and can be used as mordants when dyeing. Wood – soft, weak, light, close grained, easily worked. It weighs 33lb per cubic foot. Used for turnery

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symplocos
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Symplocos+tinctoria
https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/all/symplocos-tinctoria/

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Symplocos sumuntia

[amazon_link asins=’0671898698,B002RIN91K,1570620938,B000VZW2PA,1602201218,B00MT9HAGC,0446675067,0671023276,B00JOKTT2W’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’f7c32ba3-df50-11e7-be5f-1b82171a65cc’]

Botanical Name :Symplocos sumuntia
Family: Symplocaceae
Genus: Symplocos
Species:Symplocos sumuntia
Kingdom:Plantae
Division:Cycadophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ericales

Synonyms: Symplocos sumuntiia. Symplocos prunifolia. Sieb.&Zucc.

Common Names:

Habitat : Symplocos sumuntia is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea. It grows in woods, 1000 – 1300 metres in W. Hupeh. Mixed forests at elevations of 100 – 1800 metres.
Description:
Symplocos sumuntia is an evergreen Tree growing to 6 m (19ft 8in). It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Feb to October, and the seeds ripen from Jun to December. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)The plant is not self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

CLICK &  SEE  THE  PICTURES

Detail description of the Trees: Young branchlets brown, usually glabrous. Petiole 2–10(–15) mm; leaf blade elliptic, narrowly ovate, or ovate, 2–10 X 0.7–4.5 cm, thinly leathery, both surfaces glabrous, sometimes abaxially hairy, base cuneate to rounded, margin slightly serrate, sinuolate-dentate, or rarely subentire, apex caudate, lateral veins 4–8(–10) pairs. Racemes 1–6(–9) cm, subglabrous, pilose, or pubescent; bracts and bractlets very soon deciduous, linear, broadly ovate, or obovate, 2–5 mm and 0.3–1.5 mm respectively, densely pubescent. Pedicel 0.1–1.3 cm. Ovary 1–2 mm, glabrous or sparsely short appressed hairy. Calyx lobes triangular-ovate, 0.3–1.5 mm, glabrous or sparsely appressed hairy, margin ciliate. Corolla white or yellow, may be lilac when young, 4–8 mm. Stamens 23–40. Disc glabrous, annular. Drupes ampulliform to ovoid, 6–10(–15) X 3–6 mm, apex with persistent erect calyx lobes.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it could succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in a sunny position in any well-drained fertile neutral to acid soil. Self-sterile, it needs cross-pollination with a different plant in the same species if seed and fruit are to be produced. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Stored seed requires stratification and is best sown in a cold frame in late winter, it can take 12 months to germinate[11]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the cold frame for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 – 10cm with a heel, July/August in individual pots in a cold frame[78, 200]. Roots are formed in about 4 weeks. Good percentage.

Edible Uses:Leaves – cooked. A sweetish/sour taste. The leaves are also used as a food colouring and a flavouring. Seed. No more details are found.

Medicinal Uses: The leaves are used in the treatment of dysentery.

Other Uses:
A purplish/black dye is obtained from the plant, it does not require a mordant. No more details are given, the dye is probably obtained from the leaves. A decoction with ginger is used as a parasiticide and is effective against fleas. The part used is not specified. We have no specific information for this species but many species in this genus contain alum and can be used as mordants when dyeing.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://war.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symplocos_sumuntia
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Symplocos+sumuntia
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200017695

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Rubus argutus

[amazon_link asins=’B01MG5H5DZ,B01I27H6R2,B01LPDWUE4,B01MXE2G28,B01MR25CLZ,B01LPDFRDA,B01LW3FMGO,B01L4SL2VC,B01L0958L0′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’ccd7444c-061c-11e7-a457-0b1cc838e97c’]

Botanical Name : Rubus argutus
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Species:R. argutus
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Names: Highbush Blackberry, Sawtooth blackberry or Tall blackberry

Habitat :Rubus argutus is native to Eastern N. America – Massachusetts to Virginia. It grows on dry or moist thickets and woodland margins.

Description:
Rubus argutus is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2.5 m (8ft 2in). It is an erect, arching, or trailing shrub in the Rose family (Rosaceae). Stems are usually erect to arching in open areas and arching to trailing or decumbent in shaded areas. Primocanes (first year stems) are angled, 1-3 m long. Prickles are hooked or straight, up to 8 mm long. Leaves are palmately compound, typically with 3, sometimes 5 leaflets. Leaflets are elliptic, oblong-oblanceolate, or ovate. Terminal leaflet is 8-13 cm long and 3-8 cm wide. Leaflets are hairless on upper surface with soft, long hairs on lower surface. Leaflet margin is coarsely toothed. Prickles and leaves on floricanes (second year stems) are similar to primocanes but smaller. Flowers are arranged in short racemes on pedicels 1.5-5.0 cm long. Petals are white, 13-20 mm long. Fruit is black when mature, adhering to receptacle.

CLICK & SEE THE  PICTURES
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. This species is cultivated for its edible fruit in N. America. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Tip layering in July. Plant out in autumn. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn.

Edible Uses: …Fruit – raw or cooked. Variable in size and quality but generally with rather large and juicy drupelets. The pulpy fruit is up to 25mm long.
Medicinal Uses:

Antihaemorrhoidal; Antirheumatic; Astringent; Stimulant; Tonic.

The roots are antihaemorrhoidal, antirheumatic, astringent, stimulant and tonic. An infusion can be used in the treatment of venereal disease and as a wash in the treatment of piles. An infusion of the roots or leaves can be used in the treatment of diarrhoea and rheumatism.

Other Uses : Dye…..A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_argutus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+argutus