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Herbs & Plants

Schoenocaulon officinale

Botanical Name : Schoenocaulon officinale
Family: Melanthiaceae
Genus: Schoenocaulon
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Liliales

Synonyms: : Asagraea officinalis (Schecht. & Cham.) Lindl., Helonias officinalis D. Don, Sabadilla officinarum Brandt, Veratrum officinale Schlecht. & Cham., Veratrum sabadilla Retz.

Common Name: Sabadilla

Habitat : Schoenocaulon officinale is native to Southern United States & Peru.It grows on brushy or grassy slopes, usually in pine or oak forest, mostly in rather dry and exposed places, sometimes on moist or wet slopes, chiefly at elevations of 500 – 2,000 metres.

Description:
Schoenocaulon officinale is a perennial flowering plant growing up to 1 metre tall from an underground bulb.
The plant is used locally as an insecticide. The seed has been widely used in the past as a means of ridding the body of both internal and external parasites – large quantities of the seeds used to be exported from Venezuela to Europe

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES.

Propagation: By seeds

Medicinal Uses:
Rarely used internally now. It is occasionally used in combination with other herbs to treat rheumatism and gout. It has been used in homeopathic medicine in cases of hysteria, headache, and migraine, Externally, in the form of extracts, sabadilla has been employed mainly to remove head lice. Veratria is useful as an ointment in rheumatism and neuralgia, but is regarded as being less valuable than aconite. The ointment is also employed for the destruction of pedicule. Applied to unbroken skin it produces tingling and numbness, followed by coldness and anaesthesia. Given subcutaneously, it causes violent pain and irritation, in addition to the symptoms following an internal dose.

Other Uses: The seeds are used as an insecticide. They contain veratrin

Known Hazards: The seeds contain alkaloids that are poisonous

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schoenocaulon
http://henriettes-herb.com/plants/schoenocaulon/officinale.html
http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Schoenocaulon+officinale

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Solidago nemoralis

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Boytanical Name : Solidago nemoralis
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Solidago
Species: S. nemoralis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms:
*Aster hispidus (Muhl. ex Willd.) Kuntze not Thunb. 1783

*Doria pulcherrima (A.Nelson) Lunell

Common Names: Gray goldenrod, Gray-stem goldenrod, Old-field goldenrod, Field goldenrod, Prairie goldenrod, Dwarf goldenrod, and Dyersweed goldenrod

Habitat : Solidago nemoralis is native to North America, where it is widely Canada (every province except Newfoundland/Labrador) and the United States (all states wholly or partially east of the Rocky Mountains). It grows on the dry open places in foothills, valleys and plains.

Description:
Like other goldenrods, this species is a perennial herb. One of the smaller goldenrods, It grows 20 centimeters to one meter (8-40 inches) tall from a branching underground caudex. There are 1 to 6 erect stems, sometimes more. The stems are reddish to gray-green and have lines of short, white hairs. The lower leaves are up to 10 centimeters (4 inches long and the blades are borne on winged petioles. Leaves on the upper half of the stem are narrower and shorter and lack petioles. The spreading inflorescence can carry up to 300 flower heads. The head contains 5 to 11 yellow ray florets each a few millimeters long surrounding up to 10 yellow disc florets. Flowering occurs in late summer and fall. The fruit is a rough-texured cypsela about 2 millimeters long tipped with a pappus of bristles slightly longer….CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.It is noted for attracting wildlife.

There are two subspecies:
*Solidago nemoralis ssp. decemflora – tetraploid taxon with larger flower heads and narrower basal leaves in west-central North America
*Solidago nemoralis ssp. nemoralis – diploid or tetraploid taxon in the eastern regions of the species’ range.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will succeed in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in any moderately fertile moisture retentive soil in sun or semi-shade. Grows well in heavy clay soils. A rather greedy plant, it is apt to impoverish the soil. The plant attracts various beneficial insects such as ladybirds, lacewings and hoverflies to the garden, these insects will help to control insect pests in the garden.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Only just cover the seed and do not allow the compost to become dry. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, and grow them on for their first winter in pots. Plant them out into their permanent positions in spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Seed.
Edible Uses:…….Seed……Native American people, the Goshute used the seeds for food.
Medicinal Uses:
The plant had various uses among Native American peoples. The Houma people used it medicinally to treat jaundice. The Navajo used it as incense.
An infusion of the dried powdered herb can be used as an antiseptic.

Other Uses.: Mustard, orange and brown dyes can be obtained from the whole plant. It is cultivated in landscaping and gardens, such as butterfly gardens.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidago_nemoralis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solidago+nemoralis

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Goodyera repens

 

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Botanical Name: Goodyera repens
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Orchidoideae
Genus: Goodyera
Species: G. repens
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms : Satyrium repens. L.

Common Names: Creeping Lady’s Tresses, Lesser rattlesnake plantain, Creeping rattlesnake plantain, Dwarf rattlesnake plantain, Northern rattlesnake plantain

Habitats: Goodyera repens is a rare plant, but it is the most common orchid in Scandinavia. The species is widespread across much of Europe, Asia and North America including Russia, China, Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States, though never very common in any of these places. It grows in locally in pine woods, rarely under birch or on moist fixed dunes in northern Britain.

Description:
Goodyera repens is a perennial orchid plant, growing to 0.3 m (1ft). It is a green underground creeper that sends out occasional skinny stems above the surface. During the summer, these stems bear flowers arranged in a spiral. These flowers twist themselves to face toward the sun. It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Humble bees.The plant is not self-fertile.

CLICK & SEE THE  PICTURES

*Leaves are deciduous, mottled green and white, ½”-1″ long.
*Rhizomes are thick, fiberous.
*Flowers white to pale green and only 4mm-5 mm long; on a one-sided raceme, 1″-3½” long.
*Fruit a capsule, not quite ½” long.
Cultivation:
Requires a somewhat shady site and a well-drained compost of peat, leafmold and sand. Does well in the woodland garden. Orchids are, in general, shallow-rooting plants of well-drained low-fertility soils. Their symbiotic relationship with a fungus in the soil allows them to obtain sufficient nutrients and be able to compete successfully with other plants. They are very sensitive to the addition of fertilizers or fungicides since these can harm the symbiotic fungus and thus kill the orchid.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow, preferably as soon as it is ripe, in the greenhouse and do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed of this species is extremely simple, it has a minute embryo surrounded by a single layer of protective cells. It contains very little food reserves and depends upon a symbiotic relationship with a species of soil-dwelling fungus. The fungal hyphae invade the seed and enter the cells of the embryo. The orchid soon begins to digest the fungal tissue and this acts as a food supply for the plant until it is able to obtain nutrients from decaying material in the soil[200]. It is best to use some of the soil that is growing around established plants in order to introduce the fungus, or to sow the seed around a plant of the same species and allow the seedlings to grow on until they are large enough to move.

Medicinal Uses:
A cold infusion of the leaves has been used to improve the appetite and also in the treatment of colds and kidney problems. A poultice of the wilted leaves has been used to ‘draw out burns’. The infusion can be held in the mouth as a treatment for toothache. The root and the leaves have been used in the treatment of bladder problems. The roots and the leaves have been used in the treatment of stomach problems and female disorders. A poultice of the chewed leaves, and the swallowed juice, has been used in the treatment of snake bites. The plant ooze has been used as drops to treat sore eyes.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Goodyera+repens
http://www.rook.org/earl/bwca/nature/herbs/goodyerarep.html
http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/forb/goorep/all.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodyera_repens

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Liparis japonica

Botanical Name : Liparis japonica
Family: Orchidaceae
Synonyms: Microstylis japonica

Habitat: Liparis japonica is native to E. AsiaJapan. It grows in Woods all over Japan.
Description:
Liparis japonica is a perennian orchid plant  growing to 0.3 m (1ft). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)..CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have almost no information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most areas of this country. It is likely to require woodland conditions. Orchids are, in general, shallow-rooting plants of well-drained low-fertility soils. Their symbiotic relationship with a fungus in the soil allows them to obtain sufficient nutrients and be able to compete successfully with other plants. They are very sensitive to the addition of fertilizers or fungicides since these can harm the symbiotic fungus and thus kill the orchid.
Propagation :
Seed – surface sow, preferably as soon as it is ripe, in the greenhouse and do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed of this species is extremely simple, it has a minute embryo surrounded by a single layer of protective cells. It contains very little food reserves and depends upon a symbiotic relationship with a species of soil-dwelling fungus. The fungal hyphae invade the seed and enter the cells of the embryo. The orchid soon begins to digest the fungal tissue and this acts as a food supply for the plant until it is able to obtain nutrients from decaying material in the soil. It is best to use some of the soil that is growing around established plants in order to introduce the fungus, or to sow the seed around a plant of the same species and allow the seedlings to grow on until they are large enough to move. Division in autumn. Make sure that you keep plenty of soil with each plant. It is also said to be possible to transplant orchids after they have flowered but whilst they are still in leaf.
Edible Uses: ….Young leaves – cooked

Medicinal Uses: Not known

Resource:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Liparis+japonica

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Microtis unifolia

Botanical Name : Microtis unifolia
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Orchidoideae
Genus: Microtis
Species: M. unifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms : M. porrifolia. R.Br.

Common Name : Onion-Leaf Orchis

Habitat: Microtis unifolia is native to E.Asia to Australasia from China, Indonesia and the Phillipines to Australia and New Zealand. It grows in open places such as on banks and in poor pastures in North, South, Stewart and Chatham Islands.

Description:
Microtis unifolia is a perennial terrestrial tuberous orchid plant, growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). The plant is often robust, the stem up to 10mm thick at the base. Flower stem 10 to 40cm (sometimes to a metre) high when in flower. It has single tubular leaf. The flower stem emerging from within the leaf about one third to half way up the leaf. there are 5 – 40 flowers per raceme. Numerous and closely spaced. Each 3-5mm in length. Green to yellow-green in colour. Dorsal sepal hooded with a pointed tip. Lateral sepals curled backwards. Labellum irregular oblong with a very coarse edge, narrowest at its mid-length. Stigma not wider than the column....CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
It is in flower from Oct to January. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species. It is a terrestrial orchid that can tolerate light frosts and so could possibly be grown outdoors in the mildest parts of Britain, but its late autumn flowering habit might make it more suited to the greenhouse. The flowers have a powerful if sickly scent. Orchids are, in general, shallow-rooting plants of well-drained low-fertility soils. Their symbiotic relationship with a fungus in the soil allows them to obtain sufficient nutrients and be able to compete successfully with other plants. They are very sensitive to the addition of fertilizers or fungicides since these can harm the symbiotic fungus and thus kill the orchid.
Propagation :
Seed – surface sow, preferably as soon as it is ripe, in the greenhouse and do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed of this species is extremely simple, it has a minute embryo surrounded by a single layer of protective cells. It contains very little food reserves and depends upon a symbiotic relationship with a species of soil-dwelling fungus. The fungal hyphae invade the seed and enter the cells of the embryo. The orchid soon begins to digest the fungal tissue and this acts as a food supply for the plant until it is able to obtain nutrients from decaying material in the soil. It is best to use some of the soil that is growing around established plants in order to introduce the fungus, or to sow the seed around a plant of the same species and allow the seedlings to grow on until they are large enough to move.

Edible Uses: The root

Medicinal Uses:  Not  known

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microtis_unifolia
http://www.nativeorchids.co.nz/Species/Microtis_unifolia.html
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Microtis+unifolia