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Sirish(Albizia lebbek)

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Botanical Name : Albizia lebbek
Family:    Fabaceae
Genus:    Albizia
Species:A. lebbeck
Kingdom:Plantae
Order:    Fabales
Synonyms:Mimosajebbeck L; M.sinssa Roxb;
Local Names:Siris;acacia amarilla; East Indian Wal nut
Vernacular Names: Sans, Hind: Sirish. Eng : East Indian walnut.

 English names: lebbeck, lebbek tree, flea tree, frywood, koko and woman’s tongues tree

BENGALI NAME:SIRISH

Habitat: According to the NAS (1980) this is native to tropical Africa, Asia, and northern Australia, widely planted and naturalized throughout the tropics.

Description
Albizia lebbek is a deciduous tree to 30 m tall, with a dense shade-producing crown. Bark smoothish, light whitish or greenish gray. Leaves alternate, twice compound, with 2–4 pairs of pinnate pinnae, each with 4–10 pairs of leaflets, the ultimate leaflets entire, arcuate, oblong. Flowers white, with greenish stamens, in clusters resembling a white powder puff. Pods flat, reddish brown, several seeds, often rattling in the breeze. In Puerto Rico, flowers April to September, fruiting year-round, the fruits more prominent probably in the dry season.

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Cultivation
Immerse seed in boiling water, cool; soak for 24 hours, sowing in loam in wrapped pots 10 x 15 mm. Move seedlings to partial shade, watering and spraying as needed. Harden off for 2–3 months. Outplant at 3 x 3 or 4 x 4 m when at least 30 cm tall, at beginning of rainy season (Fabian, 1981).

Chemical Constituents: According to Roskoski et al (1980), studying Mexican material, the seeds contain 9.47% humidity, 3.57% ash, 33.60% crude protein, 3.13% crude fat, 13.17% crude fiber, 35.30% carbohydrates with a 78.25% in vitro digestibility. The pods contain 6.99% humidity, 5.47% ash, 17.86% crude protein, 2.6% crude fat, 45.08% crude fiber, and 22.00% carbohydrates with a 76.56% in vitro digestibility. The foliage contains 3.57% humidity, 7.06% ash, 28.87% crtide protein, 5.42% crude fat, 31.75% crude fiber, 23.33% carbohydrates, and 83.55% in vitro digestibility. Prohibitive levels of toxic compounds were not detected in any of the plant parts analyzed.

Uses
A fast growings nitrogen-fixing, heavy shade tree, recommended for reforestation and firewood plantations. Often planted as an avenue tree or as shade for coffee and tea. The wood is hard and strong, resembling walnut, and non siliceous. It produces a sawdust that may cause sneezing. Specific gravity 0.61; Air Dry Weight 39 lb/cu ft (ca 630 kg/cu m). The heartwood calorific value is 5,166 cals. Strong and elastic, the wood is used for cabinet wood, furniture and veneer, and serves well as firewood. The burr wood is prized for veneer. Bark has served for tanning. Foliage can be used as fodder. In the Sudan, goats eat fallen leaves and flowers. Bark containing saponin can be used in making soap, and containing tannin, can be used for tanning; used e.g. in Madras to tan fishing nets. It produces a gum which can be sold deceitfully as gum arabic. Host of the lac insect.

Its uses include environmental management, forage, medicine and wood. In India and Pakistan, the tree is used to produce timber. Wood from Albizia lebbeck has a density of 0.55-0.66 g/cm3 or higher.

Even where it is not native, some indigenous herbivores are liable to utilize lebbeck as a food resource. For example, the greater rhea (Rhea americana) has been observed feeding on it in the cerrado of Brazil.

Folk Medicine
According to Hartwell (1967–1971), the tree is used in folk remedies for abdominal tumors, in bolmes, enemas, ghees or powders. Reported to be astringent, pectoral, rejuvenant, and tonic, the siris tree is a folk remedy for boils, cough, eye ailments, flu, and lung ailments. The seed oil is used for leprosy, the powdered seed to scrofulous swellings. Indians use the flowers for spermatorrhea.

As per Ayurveda:
The plant is katu, sheela (sheelaveerya), beneficial in poisoning, derangedvata, scabies, dyscrasia, leprosy, pruritus and other skin diseases. Said to strengthen gums ,applied externally as plaster in leprous ulcers.

Parts used : seeds, leaves, bark

Therapeutic uses: seeds and bark are astringent, tonic, leaves are remedy for night blindness,

The root is used in hemicrania.-
The bark is bitter; cooling, alexiteric, anthelmintic; cures” vata “, diseases of the blood, leucoderma, itching, skin diseases, piles, excessive perspiration, inflammation, erysepelas, bronchitis; good in rat-bite.-

The flowers are given for asthma,

The root is astringent and prescribed for ophthalmia.-

The bark is anthelmintic; relieves toothache, strengthens the gums and the teeth; used in leprosy, deafness, boils, scabies, syphilis, paralysis, weakness.-

The leaves are useful in ophthalmia The leaves are good in night; blindness.-

The flowers are aphrodisiac, emollient, maturant: their smell is useful in hemicrania. The flowers are used as a cooling medicine, and also externally applied in boils, eruptions and swellings

The seeds are aphrodisiac, tonic to the brain; used for gonorrhoea, and tuberculous glands; the oil is applied topically in leucoderma.

The bark and seeds are astringent, given in piles, diarrhoea, etc.

The bark is applied to injuries to the eye..

The seeds form part of an anjan used for ophthalmic diseases.The oil extracted from them is ,considered useful in leprosy.

The powder of root- bark is used to strengthen the gums when they are spongy and ulcerative.

The seeds are considered astringent used in diarrhea, dysentery, piles. The flowers are emollient and applied to boils and carbuncles

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albizia_lebbeck

http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#sariba
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/duke_energy/Albizia_lebbek.html

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Herbs & Plants

Kanchanara(Bauhinia variegata)

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Botanical Name : Bauhinia variegata
Family : Caesalpiniaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Subclass: Rosidae
Order: Fabales
Tribe: Cercideae
Genus: Bauhinia
Species: B. variegata
Parts Used: Bark, root, leaves, flowers, seed, gum
Common names: Orchid tree and Mountain-ebony.

vernacular Name: Sans-kanchanara ,Hind – kancanar ,

Habitat: Bauhinia variegata is native to southeastern Asia, from southern China west to India. It grows  on  Open valleys with good loamy soil at elevations of 150 – 1800 metres

Description:Bauhinia variegata is a species of flowering plant.It is a small to medium-sized  deciduous tree growing to 10-12 m tall, deciduous in the dry season. The leaves are 10-20 cm long and broad, rounded, and bilobed at the base and apex. The flowers are conspicuous, bright pink or white, 8-12 cm diameter, with five petals. The fruit is a pod 15-30 cm long, containing several seeds.
click to see the pictures..>.…(01)...(1).....(2).…...(3)..…..(4)....…(5)....
This is a very popular ornamental tree in subtropical and tropical climates, grown for its scented flowers. In the Neotropics, it can be used to attract hummingbirds – such as Sapphire-spangled Emerald (Amazilia lactea), Glittering-bellied Emerald (Chlorostilbon lucidus), or White-throated Hummingbird (Leucochloris albicollis) – into gardens and parks. On the other hand, in some areas it has become naturalised and invasive.

Cultivation:
Prefers a fertile, moisture-retentive but well-drained soil, requiring a warm sheltered position in full sun. When grown in warm Temperate zones, this species can withstand short periods of temperatures as low as -5°c. In Britain, it is only likely to succeed outdoors in the very mildest parts of the country, and even then would probably require the protection of a south-facing wall. There are some cultivars, developed for their ornamental value. 243034

Propagation: Seeds germinate readily. Orchid tree also can be propagated from cuttings of semiripe wood taken in summer and rooted over bottom heat. Branches can be induced to grow roots if they are layered, either by burying a section in the ground, or scarring a small section and then wrapping it with damp sphagnum moss and enclosing in a plastic bag. The tree sometimes produces suckers which can be dug up and replanted.

Edible Uses:  The young leaves, flowers and fruits are boiled and eaten as a vegetable, or are pickled.

Medicinal  Uses:

Actions

Bark-alterative, tonic

Root-carminative

Flowers-laxative.

Medicinally  it is used in :-
*bleeding hemorrhoids
*cough
*diarrhea
*dysentery
*heartburn
*hematuria
*indigestion
*malaria
*menorrhagia
*skin diseases
*sore throat
*TB
*ulcer
*Worms
As per Ayurveda this plant is useful in haematuria and menorrhagia. Decoction of the roots prevents obesity. Bark preparations used in scrofuluous tumors.

The roots and bark are astringent, acrid, cooling, constipating, depurative, anthelmintic, vulnerary, anti-inflammatory and styptic. They are useful in vitiated conditions of pitta and kapha, diarrhoea, dysentery, skin diseases, leprosy, intestinal worms, tumours, wounds, ulcers, inflammations, scrofula, proctoptosis, hacmorrhoids, haemoptysis, cough, menorrhagia and diabetes.

These are two varieties red and white .The bark of both is tonic astringent

1.  The red flowered variety—the bark is acrid, cooling, laxative, appetising, astringent to bowels in some doses; cures biliousness, “kapha” and” vata “, ulcers, tuberculous glands, leprosy.-

The flowers are acrid, dry, sweet; cooling, astringent, galactagogue; cure diseases of the blood, bronchitis, consumption, vaginal discharges, biliousness, headache, “tridosha”.-

2. Whiteflowered variety:- The bark is acrid, sweet; appetising, cooling, astringent to the bowels; cures biliousness, “ka pha “, leucoderma, anal troubles, tuberculous glands, cough, asthma, diseases of the blood, ulcers, vaginal discharges; anthelmintic; used in strangury, thirst, burning sensation .

The bark is astringent to the bowels, tonic to the liver, cures bilousness, leucoderma, leprosy, dysmenorrhrea, menorrhagia impurities of the blood, tuberculous glands, asthma, wounds and ulcers; used as a gargle in stomatitis.-

The buds are acrid; indigestible; used in piles, cough, eye diseases, liver complaints; astringent to the bowels, styptic in hrematuria and menorrhagia

The juice of the fresh bark with the juice of the flowers of Strobilanthes citrata, 10 tolas of each, is given as an expectorant, and the bark ‘is used with ginger as an internal remedy for scrofula.

The root in decoction is given in dyspepsia and flatulency; the flowers with sugar as a gentle laxative; and the bark, flowers, root triturated in rice water as a cataplasm to promote suppuration.

The dried buds are used in piles and dysentery. They are considered cool and astringent, and are useful in diarrhoea and worms.

Other Uses: A popular ornamental in subtropical and tropical regions. Often seen as a street tree. The bark is a source of tannins. It is used for dyeing. Wood – used for house construction and making household implements.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhinia_variegata
http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/orchid_tree.htm
http://www.floridata.com/ref/B/bauh_var.cfm
http://holisticonline.biz/Herbal-Med/_Herbs/h159.htm
http://www.aTagsyurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#kanchanara

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Dhataki (Woodfordia Fruticosa)

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Botanical Name : Woodfordia Fruticosa
Family: Lythraceae
Common Name : Fire-flame Bush, Shinajitea, Woodfordia
vernacular Name: Sans: Dhataki; Hind: Dhai;; Eng : Fire-flame bush.
Other Names : Dhataki, Dhai-phul Agnijwala, Tamrapushpi, Tatiri

Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Myrtales
Genus: Woodfordia
Species: W. fruticosa
Part Used : Flowers,leaves
Habitat : Madagascar, India, Pakistan, Ceylon, China, Indonesia. Throughout india but abundantly found in north india upto 1600 m.

Description:Widespread in the foothills. This herb is a large shrub found throughout India. Has bright red flowers.

Click to see the pictures.
Shrub, c. 2.5 m tall. Leaves ovate-lanceolate or ovate, rarely falcate, ± oblique, 1.8-11.1 cm long, 8-30 mm broad. Cymes 3-16-flowered. Hypanthium 9-11 mm long, 2-5 mm broad. Petals 3-4.5 mm long, 0.5-0.75 mm broad, brick-red. Stamens 3-16.5 mm long. Ovary oblong, 4-6 mm long, 1.25-2 mm broad; style 8-15 mm long. Capsule ovate or elliptic, 6-10 mm long, 2.5-4.5 mm broad. Seeds triangular.

General Uses: Leaves and twigs yield a yellow dye used in printing. Petals yield a red dye. Flowers and leaves are used medicinally as astringent and analgesic.

Medicinal Uses :Stimulant, astringent, tonic. The flowers are acrid, astringent, styptic, depurative, utreine sadative, constipating, antibacterial, corrective of urinary pigments, febrifuge and alexeteric. They are useful in the conditions of kapha and pitta, leprosy, burning sensation, skindiseases, diarrhoea, dysentery, fever, headache, hemorrhoids, herpes, internal hemorrhage, leukorrhea, liver disorders, menorrhagia, ulcers, wounds. Juice of leaves are used in bilious sickness. They are also valued as a stimulant in pregnancy. Dried flower powder is used in ulcers and wounds to reduce the discharge and promote granulation.
The juice of its fresh flowers applied on the forehead, reduces the headache.

The herb is used in the treatment of:
*diarrhea
*dysentery
*fever
*headache
*hemorrhoids
*herpes
*internal hemorrhage
*leukorrhea
*liver disorders
*menorrhagia
*ulcers
*wounds

Flowers of this herb are used in dysentery and internal hemorrhages, in lucorrhea, and menorrhagia.

Juice of leaves are used in bilious sickness.

As per Ayurveda:It is katu, ushna, intoxicating, antodotal, beneficial in dysentery , diarrhoea ,efficacious in erysipelas and ulcer.

Therapeutic Uses:
Flowers: (dried) astringent; useful in dysentery :haemorrhoids, impaired hepatic function, leucorrhoea, menorrhagia and considered as a safe stimulant in pregnancy, they are useful in vitiated kapha, pitta, leprosy, skin diseases, burning sensation, haemorrhages, diarrhea, dysentery, foul ulcers, diabetes, hepatopathy, it is an important ingredient in Asava and Arista as they aid in fermentation.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Woodfordia_fruticosa.jpg
http://www.motherherbs.com/woodfordia-fruticosa.html
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200014668

http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#dhataki

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Aegle Marmelos (Bilva or Bel)

Bael Aegle marmelos at Narendrapur near Kolkat...
Image via Wikipedia

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Botanical Name : Aegle marmelos
Family Name: Rutaceae
Subfamily: Aurantioideae
vernacular Name:
: Sans: Bilva; Hind: Bel;; Eng- Bael tree.
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Tribe: Clauseneae
Genus: Aegle

Habitat:The Bilva tree grows in almost all parts of India, southern Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand.

Description:Tall and austere, with a stern aspect, gnarled trunk and sharp thorns, the Bilva is undoubtedly Lord Shiva’s tree.The fruit shell is heard, when ripen the shell becomes heard like wood so, it’s other name is also wood apple. The tree is 15 to 20 feet tall and bears lot of fruits. The tree is more or less evergreen  in all the seasons.In most of Hindu festive the leaves are used  and considered  sacred.

You may click to see the picture

As per Ayurveda, it is madhura, palatable, kashaya; pacifies deranged pitta; guru; be deranged kapha, fever, diarrhoea, appetizing and gastric stimulant. used for the restoration of normal functions of deranged tridosha: laghu, efficacious in rheumatism.

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Fruit (unripe) is snigdha, guru, astrgastric stimulant. Ripe fruit is madhura, palatable, guru, katu-tikta ushna, astringent and used in the treatment of deranged tridosha.

Parts Used: Fruits, seeds, leaves, bark and root.

Therapeutic Uses:

Fruits: (ripe) alterative, cooling, laxative and nutritive; useful in habitual constipation, chronic dysentery and dyspepsia; tonic; (unripe) antidiarrhoeal, astringent, demulcent, digestive and stomachic;

Seeds: laxative;

Flowers: antidiarrhoeal and antiemetic; leaves: expectorant, febrifuge; fresh ones used in dropsy; efficacious in bronchial asthma;

Bark (stem and root): beneficial in intermittent fever, melancholia and palpitation of heart; root: one of the ingredients of Dashamula, a common Ayurvedic formulation, particularly useful in loss of appetite and puerperal diseases

The root is sweet; cures fevers due to “tridosha “, pain in the abdomen, palpitations of the heart, urinary troubles, hypochondriasis, melancholia; removes” vata “, “pitta “, and” kapha”.

The leaves are astringent, digestive; laxative and febrifuge when fresh; remove vata ” and” kapha “; useful in ophthalmia, deafness, and inflammations.-

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The flowers allay thirst and vomiting; useful in dysentery.

The unripe fruit is oily, bitter, acrid, sour; tasty, but difficult to digest ;appetiser, binding; cures dysentery; removes pain.-

The oil is hot and cures” vata “.

The ripe fruit is acrid, bitter, sweet; appetiser, binding, tonic, febrifuge; causes biliousness. and “tridosha”; removes” vata ” and” kapha”; good for the heart .

The ripe fruit is hot and dry; tonic, restorative, astringent, laxa.tive; good for the heart and the brain; bad for the liver and the chest

The ‘unripe fruit is cut up and sun-dried, and in this form is sold in the markets  in dried whole or broken slices.It is regarded as astringent, digestive and stomachic, and is prescribed in diarrhoea and dysentery, often proving effectual in chronic cases, after all other medicines have failed. It seems especially usefull in chronic diarrhoea; ‘a simple change of the hours of meals and an. alteration in the ordinary diet, combined “,with bael fruit, will almost universally succeed.

The small unripe fruit is given with funnel seeds and ginger, in decoction, for piles.

The ripe fruit is sweet, aromatic and cooling; and, made into a morning sherbet, cooled with ice, is pleasantly laxative and a good simple cure for dyspepsia.

The dried ripe pulp is astringent and used in dysentery.

The root bark is sometimes made into a decoction and used in the cure of intermittent fever. It .constitutes an ingredient. in the dasamol of ten roots. used in hypochondriasis, melancholia, and palpitation of the heart.”

The leaves are made into poultice, used in the treatment of ophthalmia, and the fresh juice diluted is praised in catarrhs and feverishness.

The fresh juice of the leaves is given, with the addition of b1ack pepper, in anasarca, with costiveness and jaundice. In external inflammations, the juice of the leaves is given internally to remove the supposed derangement of humours.

The expressed juice of the leaves is used in ophthalmia and other eye affections. decoction of the leaves is valued in asthmatic complaints. A hot poultice to the head is used in delirium of fevers.
A water, distilled from the flowers, is said to be aledipharmic.
A decoction of the root of Aegle Marmelos is given with sugar and fried rice for checking diarrhrea and gastric irritability in infants.

Medicinal uses:
It is astringent, cooling, carminative, laxative, restorative, febrifuge and stomachic and is used in colitis, dysentery, diarrhoea, flatulence, difficulty in micturition, fever, vomiting and colic. The tender fruit is bitter, astringent, antilaxative, digestive and promotes digestion and strength, overcomes vata, colics and diarrhea.

Home remedies:
*Juice of mature fruit of Bilva, is so effective in the bowel disturbances like recurrent constipation.
*Pulp of unripe fruit of Bilva is so effective in the diarrhea, dysentery, and sprue.
*Powder of dry pulp of this unripe fruit is also effective in loose motions.
*In chronic dysenteric conditions, accompanied by loose stools alternating with occasional constipation, the ripe fruit is *widely used in different formulations

Click to learn more about Bilva ….(1) ….. (2) …..(3)

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.chakrapaniayurveda.com/bilva.html
http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#bhallataka
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bael

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Herbs & Plants

Ativisha

 

Botanical Name : Aconitum hrterophyllum
Family: Ranunculaceae
Subfamily: Ranunculoideae
Tribes: Aconiteae
Genus: Aconitum
Species: Aconitum heterophyllum

Other Common Names: Atees [E], Atees,Indian [E], Atis [E], Ativisha [E], Vajji Turki [E],

Vernacular names: sans- Ativisha ,Hin- Atish, Eng- Indian Atis

Other Names: Cao wu / Tsao wu
Parts used: Underground stem and root.
Habitat: Usually found on humus-rich soils in the alpine and subalpine zones, and in forests, 2300 – 2900 metres. India; Iran; Sanscrit; Us

Description:This plant thrives in most soils and in the shade of trees. This plant is so tough it even grows marvelously in heavy clay soils and well in the open woodlands. Most of all it prefers a moist soil which contains the characteristic of calcium carbonate, calcium, or limestone, also in the sun or semi shade. Other plants of this genus (a group of species exhibiting similar characteristics) seem to be immune to the rabbits and deer for they do not want to eat it. The Ativisha (Aconitum heterophylum) has small, yellowish-white, bulbous roots, which are shaped like a large bud about four to six times that of a jasmine bud….

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Part of the root crosses over and is milkey white with four black dots like banana seeds. The root is best harvested in the autumn as soon as the plant dies down and is dried for later use. This plant has many green leaves and grows as a greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species. The main place this herb is found is in sub-alpine and alpine regions; Himalayas from Indus to Kumaon.

Cultivation details:-
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands.

Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer.

A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.
Propagation:-
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer.

Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.
Harvesting:The root is best harvested in the autumn as soon as the plant dies down and is dried for later use. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.
Therapeutic Uses:
Today Aconitum heterophyllum is used in cases of diarrhea, liver disorders, hemorrhoids, edema, dysentery, inflammatory infections with cough, cold, flu, or dyspepsia and is a mild diuretic. It stimulates the flow of breast milk in nursing mothers and when taken regularly by nursing mothers, helps prevent colic in their babies. It is also used to treat headaches caused from eating excessive amounts of greasy foods, thirst associated with fever, yellowish sclera (white outer coat enclosing the eyeball), nausea, vomiting, throat pain, and lung and eye inflammation. The root is also used for treating digtestive disorders such as anorexia, piles, diarrhea, vomiting and worms. It is said to help revitalize sexual desire and reduce obesity. The fried root is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, aphrodisiac, astringent, cholagogue, febrifuge, and tonic. It is used in India in the treatment of dyspepsia, diarrhea and coughs. Used in Tibetan medicine, where it is said to have a bitter taste and cooling potency. Also used to treat poisoning from scorpion or snake bites, the fevers of contagious diseases and inflammation of the intestines. This herb is just wonderful in many afflictions. The scientists and pharmacists have also found that Acontum hterophyllum has also been useful in the following diseases; Abdominal Distention, Amenorrhoea, Amnesia, Anorexia Nervosa, Bronchitis, Colic, Common Cold, Dysmenorrhoes, Fevers, Flatulence, Flu and Halitosis (bad breath).

The seeds of this plant are also used in medicine, mainly as a stimulant, aromatic, emmenaguogue, galactagogue, stomachic, carminative, antipyretic and anathemmatic. Along with antispasmodics they relieve period pain. They are also useful in indigestion (especially stress-related), hyperacidity, hiccup and abdominal pain in children and adults. Chewing the seeds removes bad breath. Research has also established that the essential oil has antibacterial properties, which inhibit the growth of harmful intestinal bacteria.

Powdered root mixed with honey is effective for children suffering from cough, coryza, fever and vomiting.

Root is considered to be aphrodisiac, digestive, valuable febrifuge, bitter tonic and useful in throat infections, abdominal pain and gastralgia .

They are useful in dysentery, stomach disorders, fever, malarial fever, vomitings, haemorrhoids, haemorrhages, internal inflammatory conditions, They are highly recommended in diseases for children.

According to  Ayurveda :
It is katu, ushnaveerya, tikta; beneficial in deranged kapha and pitta;antipyretic, antidysenteric and antidiarrhoeal, expectorant, antidotal and antiemetic.
Medicinal Uses: Analgesic; Antiinflammatory; Antiperiodic; Aphrodisiac; Astringent; Cholagogue; Febrifuge; Tonic.

The dried root is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiperiodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, cholagogue, febrifuge and tonic. It is used in India in the treatment of dyspepsia, diarrhoea and coughs. It is also used in Tibetan medicine, where it is said to have a bitter taste and a cooling potency. It is used to treat poisoning from scorpion or snake bites, the fevers of contagious diseases and inflammation of the intestines.

Precautions:The whole Aconitum heterophyllum plant is highly toxic, even simple skin contact can cause numbness in people with sensitive skin. In large doses, this herb can cause constipation. Toxic overdoses will cause parasthesia, dry mouth, bradycardia, and in extreme cases, coma. Aconitum heterophyllum is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. As always, when you buy a product alwyays follow the instructions.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#ativisha
http://www.herbalremedies.com/aconitum-information.html

http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Aconitum+heterophyllum