Tag Archives: Diet food

Low Carb More Effective than Low Fat Diet for Insulin Resistant Women

Obese women with insulin resistance lose more weight after three months on a lower-carbohydrate diet than on a traditional low-fat diet with the same number of calories, according to a new study.
CLICK & SEE
“The typical diet that physicians recommend for weight loss is a low-fat diet,” said the study’s lead author Raymond Plodkowski. “However, as this study shows, not all people have the same response to diets.”

People with insulin resistance, a common precursor for Type 2 diabetes, metabolize carbohydrates, or “carbs,” abnormally, which may affect their rate of weight loss. For them, Plodkowski said, “the lower-carb diet is more effective, at least in the short term.”

At 12-weeks, the study funded by Jenny Craig and using prepared calorie-controlled meals as part of a behavioral weight loss program, found that the insulin resistant women on a lower-carb diet lost 3.4 pounds more than those on a low-fat diet.

Forty-five obese women between the ages of 18 and 65 years participated in the study, and all had insulin resistance, as found by fasting blood levels of insulin. The researchers randomly assigned the women to either a low-fat or lower-carb diet. The groups did not differ significantly in average body weight, the authors reported. On average, women in the low-fat diet group weighed 213 pounds, while women in the other group weighed 223 pounds.

The composition of the low-fat diet was 60 percent of calories from carbs, 20 percent from fat and 20 percent from protein. Although the lower-carb diet also had 20 percent of calories from protein, it had 45 percent from carbs and 35 percent from primarily unsaturated fats, such as nuts. Menus included a minimum of 2 fruits and 3 vegetable servings a day.

Use of prepared meals helped make the structured diets easier and more palatable for the dieters, according to Plodkowski. “We wanted to make this study real-world—anyone could follow this plan by making moderate changes as part of a healthy menu,” he said.

Both groups lost weight at each monthly weigh-in, but by 12 weeks, the insulin resistant group receiving the lower-carb diet lost significantly more weight, 19.6 pounds versus 16.2 pounds in the low-fat diet group – approximately 21 percent more on average.

“These data have potential widespread applications for clinicians when counseling people with insulin resistance to help improve weight loss as part of a calorie-restricted diet,” Plodkowski said. “They should at least initially lower their carbohydrate intake.”

Source:Elements4Health

Enhanced by Zemanta

Pistachio Nuts Significantly Lower Cholesterol Levels

]A study has found that a diet containing nuts, including pistachios, significantly lowered total and LDL-cholesterol levels, in addition to triglycerides. The 600 subject, 25 clinical trial study, conducted in seven counties, is the most comprehensive study of its kind and further substantiates the evidence that nuts can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

click & see the pictures
The report, authored by Dr. Joan Sabaté, set out to quantify the cholesterolreducing benefits of various nuts, such as pistachios, by analyzing previously published human clinical trials.

The authors reviewed the results of 25 human clinical trials published from 1992 through 2007. The analysis included data from 583 men and women, aged 19 to 86 years old. Among the studies, nut consumption ranged from less than one ounce to 4.75 ounces per day. The average daily intake for the meta-analysis was 67 grams per day or 2.4 ounces.

The results found that when 67 grams of nuts were consumed, triglycerides were reduced by 10.2 percent among those with high triglyceride levels at the onset of the study; and total and LDL-cholesterol were lowered by 5.1 percent and 7.4 percent, respectively. Individuals with higher baseline LDL-cholesterol levels also experienced a greater reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol levels compared to those with normal baseline LDL levels. Subjects following a typical Western-diet also experienced a greater reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol levels (-7.4 percent and – 9.6 percent, respectively) compared to a low-fat (-4.1 percent and -6.0 percent, respectively) or a Mediterranean diet (-4.1 percent and -6.0 percent, respectively).

Another important finding was that greater cholesterol lowering benefits were seen in individuals with a lower BMI compared to those with a higher BMI. Additionally, cholesterol levels were reduced in a dose-dependent result, with benefits seen in as low as a one-ounce serving per day; the greatest benefits were seen when 20 percent of calories were consumed daily from nuts. For the typical 2,000-calorie diet, 20 percent equals 400 calories of nuts or 2.4 ounces (about 120) pistachios.

“Enjoying a handful or two of in-shell pistachios may provide significant heart health benefits,” said Martin Yadrick, immediate past-president of the American Dietetic Association. “They are known to also improve blood vessel function, blood sugar control, act as potent antioxidant and offer weight management benefits, all of which are important for improving heart health.”

With more than 30 different vitamins, minerals and beneficial phytonutrients, in-shell pistachios are a nutrient-rich snack. In fact, pistachios provide more potassium and phytosterols than any other nut and are the only nut to contain the carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. They also have one of the highest antioxidant capacities of all nuts.

Source:Elements4Health

Enhanced by Zemanta

What’s in a Healthy Lunchbox?

Ninety-nine out of every 100 packed lunches being eaten by primary school children are reported to be unhealthy and failing to meet nutritional standards.

click & see the pictures

So what should a healthy lunch contain and what foods should be left out?

According to advice from the Food Standards Agency,a healthy packed lunch should include:

• Meat, fish or a dairy source of protein

• Starchy carbohydrate, such as a wholegrain sandwich, to provide energy

• At least one portion each of a fruit and vegetable or salad

• Water or milk to drink, but diluted fruit juice and yoghurt drinks or smoothies are acceptable

 

The key foods to avoid are:-

• Sweets and chocolate

• Snacks, like crisps, with added salt/sugar/fat

Sugary and fizzy drinks

Deep-fried foods and processed meats

• White bread – if children won’t eat brown, try whole white sliced bread

Nutritional standards for school meals were introduced in 2006 and standards for vending machines, breakfast clubs and tuck shops came into force a year later.

In 2008, strict nutrition content guidelines for primary schools were introduced and extended to secondary schools in September 2009.

They include maximum/minimum levels of energy or calories and 13 different nutrients, including fat, salt and sugars.

SUGAR, FAT AND SALT (As per  Food Standards Agency)
Sugar: 15g sugar per 100g is high in sugar, 5g or less is low
Fat: 20g fat per 100g is high in fat, 3g or less is low

Salt: 1.5g salt per 100g is high in salt, 0.3g or less is low


The Schools Food Trust – an independent body set up to advise schools on healthy eating – says there are no plans to issue statutory guidance on packed lunches, but it has produced some sample lunchbox menus

You may click to see:

SAMPLE MENU  in a packed standard lunch (526.29 K

Children’s lunchboxes ‘unhealthy’
Pupils are to face lunchbox exams
Charity seeks end to lunchbox ham
Food Standards Agency
School Food Trust

Source: BBC News:12Th. January. 2010

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Eat Fat With Tomatoes to Absorb All the Nutrients

Tomatoes are a good source of the antioxidants lycopene and beta-carotene. But if you eat a tomato without adding a little fat, your body is unlikely to absorb all these nutrients.
tomato with corn
Scientists recruited graduate students to eat bowls of salad greens with tomatoes and various types of salad dressings. The researchers put IV lines into the participants’ veins and drew blood samples before and after they’d eaten the salads in order to get precise measurements of the absorption of nutrients.

When researchers went back and analyzed the blood samples, they realized that people who had eaten fat-free or low-fat dressings didn’t absorb the beneficial carotenoids from the salad. Only when they had eaten the oil-based dressing did they get the nutrients.

Sources: NPR July 27, 2009

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Older People More Fit Than Yonger

The average 50-year-old is now healthier and fitter than someone half their age, a study revealed .
Researchers found the average 25-year-old consumes over 2,300 calories a day, exercises only three times a week and indulges in 12 portions of junk food a month.

But the typical 50-year-old has only 1,990 calories each day, does at least four forms of exercise and treats themselves to just one piece of junk food each week.

And while those in their mid-20s treat themselves to three takeaways a month, the older generation have only one.

The study, commissioned by global nutrition and direct selling company Herbalife, quizzed 4,000 Brits on their diet and lifestyle.

Neil Spiers, Herbalife’s Regional Vice President, said: ‘The results of the study will be surprising to most as it’s natural to think that the younger you are, the fitter you are.

‘It seems many young people are making the mistake of underestimating the benefit of a more balanced, holistic approach to diet and lifestyle.

‘It’s great to think that the older generation are showing the youngsters the way when it comes to healthier living.’
The nationwide research of 16-80 year olds surveyed them about their health and exercise habits.

It found the over-50s are more likely to walk as much as they can during the day – to the shops or with the dog – while those in their 20s tend to drive everywhere.

When it comes to excuses for not exercising, over a third (36 per cent) of 25 year olds blame not having enough time, compared to 22 per cent of over-50s.

The research found 70 per cent of Brits see themselves as healthy – exercising for 27 minutes a day, at least three times a week, opting to go for a walk, run, cycle or gym.

A quarter of Brits polled cycle to see friends or go to the shops, and 70 per cent take the stairs instead of the lift.

Nearly four in 10 walk to the train station or to work in a bid to keep fit.

The study also found the average Brit believes they are overweight by nine pounds.

Over a quarter of the population are currently on a diet – with the ‘low fat‘ (30 per cent), ‘low carb‘ (14 per cent) and ‘detox’ (eight per cent) diets being the most popular.

And they would wish to lose 13 pounds for them to be their ideal weight.

The study also highlighted the lengths people will go to in order to hide their true weight.

Nearly a quarter have fibbed about the amount they eat, one in five has actually lied about their weight and 12 per cent have cut labels out of clothing which revealed their real size.

A cheeky 16 per cent have turned to slimming aids without telling anyone and seven per cent have uploaded misleading pictures on Facebook.

And 30 per cent have ‘binge dieted’ to fit into a dress or to look good in a bikini in time for a holiday.
How the lifestyles compared…

………………………………………….25-year-old…………..50-year-old
Daily calorie intake ……………………….2,321 …………..1,990
Forms of exercise a week ……………………..3………………… 4
Minutes of exercise a day…………………….26……………… 30

Junk food a week………………………………… 3…………………1
Takeaways a month…………………………….. 3…………………1
Units of alcohol a week ……………………….. 6.6…………….. 5.2
Snacks a day………………………………………. 3……………….  2
Number of diets……………………………………2………………..4
Length of average diet in weeks ………………5.2……………..6.7

Source:: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1203224/How-average-50-year-old-fitter-half-age.html#ixzz0MkLvRsRh

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]