Categories
Exercise

Line It Up for Upper-body Strength

This move helps develop strong muscles in the core and upper body. For maximum benefit, make sure that your knees, hips and shoulders are in a straight line before you try to lift yourself.
CLICK & SEE
Bend your knees and lie on your left side. Place your left elbow directly below your left shoulder, palm flat on the floor. Stack your knees and ankles on a round 36-inch foam roller, letting your outer left hip rest on the floor. Reach your right arm out to the side. Check that your hips are forward, in line with your knees.

On an inhale, press down against your left outer thigh and your left hand/forearm as you raise your hips off the floor. Contract your abdominals and keep your body in a straight line as you straighten your left leg. Balance in this position for six to 10 seconds. Focus on keeping your left shoulder pressed down away from your left ear. Slowly lower your hips, then repeat two more times on this side. Switch sides and repeat with your right forearm and hand on the floor.

Source: Los Angeles Times

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements
Categories
Exercise

Seated Twist

[amazon_link asins=’B01CTRKNVC,B00FO9U46W,B00DG9KIE0,B017C8OADA,B00R3MZQDE,B00LY8TFZI,B01MQP3TFX,B016CKO30Y,B0043LKPOI’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’2ba2ec14-7b7f-11e7-803a-4fb304661434′]

In seated twists like this one, it’s important to sit up tall and focus on lengthening your spine before you begin to twist. Done correctly, spinal twists increase circulation and build strength and flexibility in your back muscles. But you must be warmed up properly before you perform them.

STEP-1. Sit on the floor with both legs straight in front of you. Bend your left knee and place your left foot flat on the floor in front of your left sitting bone. Bend your left elbow and place it on the inside of your left knee with your fingertips pointing upward. Place your right fingertips on the floor behind you to help you sit upright. Inhale, lengthen your spine, extending through the crown of your head. On an exhale, rotate your ribcage, chest, shoulders and head to the right – don’t allow your left knee to flare out to the left (keep it pointed up to the ceiling). Pause for three full breaths.

 

STEP-2. When you’re ready to intensify this twist, wrap your left arm around and behind your left leg and move your right hand to grasp the fingers of your left hand. Keep your shoulders relaxed and press down with your left foot as you continue to lift up through the crown of your head. Stay here for three to six deep, full breaths, then slowly release and repeat on the other side.

Source:Los Angeles  Times

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Categories
Exercise

Dumbbells Aid in Tricep-Toning

Adding core stability to this arm exercise will shape and tone the muscles in your midsection as well as the backs of your upper arms, called the triceps.

1. Hold a 5- to 10-pound dumbbell in each hand and lie on a full-length round roller. Place your hips and head on the roller (you can use a yoga block under your head if necessary). Put your feet flat on the floor, hip-width apart, toes and knees facing forward. Straighten your arms above your chest and press the ends of the dumbbells together.

2. Inhale, slowly lower the dumbbells until they’re just above your forehead, pausing with your wrists at shoulder height. Then exhale, contracting the backs of your upper arms to reverse directions and move the dumbbells up to the start position. Do not “lock out” at the elbows. Hold for two seconds at the top of the lift and repeat until you have done 12 reps. Rest for 20 seconds and repeat for a total of three sets.

Source : Los Angeles Times

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Tennis Elbow

Definition:
Tennis elbow is a condition where the outer part of the elbow becomes painful and tender, usually as a result of a specific strain or overuse. Although it is called “tennis elbow”, it is not restricted to tennis players –hyperextensions of the elbow, from whatever cause, can be classified as tennis elbow. Anyone who does a lot of work involving lifting at the elbow or repetitive movements at the wrist is susceptible to tennis elbow. The condition was first described in 1883.. The medical term is lateral epicondylitis.

Doctors first identified Tennis Elbow (or lateral epicondylitis) more than 100 years ago. Today nearly half of all tennis players will suffer from this disorder at some point. Interestingly though, tennis players actually account for less than 5 percent of all reported cases making the term for this condition something of a misnomer.

There are 2 additional strain related conditions which are often mistaken for Tennis Elbow. These being Golfer’s Elbow & Bursitis. Before we delve into the details of what Tennis Elbow actually is and options that are available for relieving & preventing the pain…let’s look at the distinguishing characteristics of each of these 3 ailments.

Tennis Elbow(lateral epicondylitis) Outside of Elbow:-
The onset of pain, on the outside (lateral) of the elbow, is usually gradual with tenderness felt on or below the joint’s bony prominence. Movements such as gripping, lifting and carrying tend to be troublesome.

..Click to see the picture...

Golfer’s Elbow: (medial epicondylitis) Inside of Elbow
The causes of golfers elbow are similar to tennis elbow but pain and tenderness are felt on the inside (medial) of the elbow, on or around the joint’s bony prominence.

The condition is called Golfer’s elbow because in making a golf swing this tendon is stressed; many people, however, who develop the condition have never handled a golf club. It is also sometimes called Pitcher’s elbow due to the same tendon being stressed by the throwing of objects such as a baseball, but this usage is much less frequent. Apparently you can also get golfer’s elbow from serving in tennis.

Bursitis: Back of Elbow
Often due to excessive leaning on the joint or a direct blow or fall onto the tip of the elbow.A lump can often be seen and the elbow is painful at the back of the joint.

Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae, or small sacs of synovial fluid, in the body. Bursae rest at the points where internal functionaries, like muscles and tendons, slide across bone. Healthy bursae create a smooth and almost frictionless gliding surface. With hundreds of them throughout the body they provide this surface for all motion, making movement normally painless. When bursitis takes hold, however, movement that relies on the inflamed bursa becomes rough and painful. Movement of tendons and muscles over the inflamed bursa causes it to become more inflamed, perpetuating the problem.

Symptoms of Tennis Elbow:-

*Pain on the outer part of elbow (lateral epicondyle).

*Gripping and movements of the wrist hurt, especially wrist extension and lifting movements.

*Tenderness to touch, and elbow pain on simple actions such as lifting up a cup of coffee or throwing a baseball.

*Pain usually subsides overnight.

*Recurring pain on the outside of the upper forearm just below the bend of the elbow; occasionally, pain radiates down the arm toward the wrist.

*Pain caused by lifting or bending the arm or grasping even light objects such as a coffee cup.

*Difficulty extending the forearm fully (because of inflamed muscles, tendons and ligaments).

*Pain that typically lasts for 6 to 12 weeks; the discomfort can continue for as little as 3 weeks or as long as several years.

The damage that tennis elbow incurs consists of tiny tears in a part of the tendon and in muscle coverings. After the initial injury heals, these areas often tear again, which leads to hemorrhaging and the formation of rough, granulated tissue and calcium deposits within the surrounding tissues. Collagen, a protein, leaks out from around the injured areas, causing inflammation. The resulting pressure can cut off the blood flow and pinch the radial nerve, one of the major nerves controlling muscles in the arm and hand.

Tendons, which attach muscles to bones, do not receive the same amount of oxygen and blood that muscles do, so they heal more slowly. In fact, some cases of tennis elbow can last for years, though the inflammation usually subsides in 6 to 12 weeks.

Many medical textbooks treat tennis elbow as a form of tendonitis, which is often the case, but if the muscles and bones of the elbow joint are also involved, then the condition is called epicondylitis. However, if you feel pain directly on the back of your elbow joint, rather than down the outside of your arm, you may have bursitis, which is caused when lubricating sacs in the joint become inflamed. If you see swelling, which is almost never a symptom of tennis elbow, you may want to investigate other possible conditions, such as arthritis, infection, gout or a tumor.

If no treatment given, can become chronic and more difficult to eradicate.

Exams and Tests:-
The diagnosis is made by clinical signs and symptoms, since x-rays usually show no abnormality. Often there will be pain or tenderness when the tendon is gently pressed near where it attaches to the upper arm bone, over the outside of the elbow.

There is also pain near the elbow when the wrist is extended (bent backwards, as when applying a motorcycle’s throttle) against resistance.

Treatment:
The goal of treatment is to relieve pain and swelling. Treatment may include:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin)
Local injection of cortisone and an numbing medicine
Using a splint to keep the forearm and elbow still for 2 to 3 weeks
Heat therapy
Physical therapy
Pulsed ultrasound to break up scar tissue, promote healing, and increase blood flow in the area
To prevent the injury from happening again during aggravating activities either a splint may be worn or only limited participation in the activity undertaken. If the pain persists despite non-surgical treatments, surgery may be necessary.

Although not founded in clinical research , the tennis player’s treatment of choice is frequent icing and compression (Cold compression therapy) for inflammation, and taking anti-inflammatory pain-killers, such as ibuprofen. In general the evidence base for intervention measures is poor. A brace might also be recommended by a doctor to reduce the range of movement in the elbow and thus reduce the use and pain. Also, ergonomic considerations are important to help with the successful relief of lateral elbow pain.

Relief Of Tennis Elbow:-

Initial measures
Rest, ice, and compression are the treatments of choice. There are many excellent cold compression therapy products available. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce pain and inflammation.

The best way to relieve tennis elbow is to stop doing anything that irritates your arm — a simple step for the weekend tennis player, but not as easy for the manual laborer, office worker, or professional athlete.

The most effective conventional and alternative treatments for tennis elbow have the same basic premise: Rest the arm until the pain disappears, then massage to relieve stress and tension in the muscles, and exercise to strengthen the area and prevent re-injury. If you must go back to whatever caused the problem in the first place, be sure to warm up your arm for at least 5 to 10 minutes with gentle stretching and movement before starting any activity. Take frequent breaks.

Conventional medicine offers an assortment of treatments for tennis elbow, from drug injections to surgery, but the pain will never go away completely unless you stop stressing the joint. Re-injury is inevitable without adequate rest.

For most mild to moderate cases of tennis elbow, aspirin or ibuprofen will help address the inflammation and the pain while you are resting the injury, and then you can follow up with exercise and massage to speed healing.

For stubborn cases of tennis elbow your doctor may advise corticosteroid injections, which dramatically reduce inflammation, but they cannot be used long-term because of potentially damaging side effects.

Another attractive option for many sufferers, especially those who prefer to not ingest medication orally, is the application of an appropriate and effective topical anti-inflammatory. CT Cream with A.C.P. was specifically designed to reduce inflammation and does so by taking advantage of well known elements Arnica, Choline, Pyridoxine and Vitamin B6. Researched, formulated and introduced recently by Dr. Ying Lee, CT Cream has proven to be extremely successful in treating inflammation related ailments such as epicondylitis, tendonitis, bursitis & carpal tunnel syndrome.

If rest, anti-inflammatory medications, and a stretching routine fail to cure your tennis elbow, you may have to consider surgery, though this form of treatment is rare (fewer than 3 percent of patients). One procedure is for the tendon to be cut loose from the epicondyle, the rounded bump at the end of the bone, which eliminates stress on the tendon but renders the muscle useless. Another surgical technique involves removing so-called granulated tissue in the tendon and repairing tears.

Even after you feel you have overcome a case of tennis elbow, be sure to continue babying your arm. Always warm up your arm for 5 to 10 minutes before starting any activity involving your elbow. And if you develop severe pain after use anyway, pack your arm in ice for 15 to 20 minutes and call your doctor.
Alternative treatments:-
Laser Therapy
The Use of Laser Therapy (Low Power or Low Intensity Laser Therapy) is a currently used treatment. The approach was spun off of research on how light affects cells. The findings, that light stimulates and accelerates normal healing, sparked the creation of several devices. The dosage often determines the extent of the success with this treatment, so it is generally recommended that experienced clinicians apply the therapy with a device that can be ‘customized.’ Professional athletes have used the therapy and it has gained attention in the media lately, on shows like the Canadian health program “Balance” on CTV. However, studies evaluating the efficacy of laser therapy for tennis elbow are currently contradictory.

One study has alleged that electrical erin stimulation combined with Acupuncture is beneficial but evaluation studies are inconclusive .

Click for Home Remedies Of Tennis Elbow-> .(1).…...(2).……(3)……..(4)

Prognosis :-
Most people improve with non-surgical treatment. The majority of those that do have surgery show an improvement in symptoms.

Prevention:-
To prevent tennis elbow:
*Lift objects with your palm facing your body.

*Try strengthening exercises with hand weights. With your elbow cocked and your palm down, repeatedly bend your wrist. Stop if you feel any pain.

*Stretch relevant muscles before beginning a possibly stressful activity by grasping the top part of your fingers and gently but firmly pulling them back toward your body. Keep your arm fully extended and your palm facing outward.

CAUTION!
To prevent a relapse:
Discontinue or modify the action that is causing the strain on your elbow joint. If you must continue, be sure to warm up for 10 minutes or more before any activity involving your arm, and apply ice to it afterward. Take more frequent breaks.
Try strapping a band around your forearm just below your elbow. If the support seems to help you lift objects such as heavy books, then continue with it. Be aware that such bands can cut off circulation and impede healing, so they are best used once tennis elbow has disappeared.

Call Your Doctor If….
The pain persists for more than a few days; chronic inflammation of the tendons can lead to permanent disability.
The elbow joint begins to swell; tennis elbow rarely causes swelling, so you may have another condition such as arthritis, gout, infection or even a tumor.

Possible Complications:-
Recurrence of the injury with overuse
Rupture of the tendon with repeated steroid injections
Failure to improve with nonoperative or operative treatment; these may be due to nerve entrapment in the forearm.

CLICK TO LEARN MORE

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.tennis-elbow.net/tenniselbow.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis_elbow

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Folliculitis

[amazon_link asins=’B00EV1D79A,B00GBL3RES,B010FHRA4G,B00NQND1BI,B01MQMLK1C,B00NHU39P8,B00HZ381GU,B012UDNONE,B00GBL0A6G’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’fb10d90e-ad7a-11e7-b663-617469835012′]

Alternative Names

Pseudofolliculitis barbae; Tinea barbae; Barber’s itch

Definition:   Folliculitis is inflammation of one or more hair follicles. The condition may occur anywhere on the skin.

Folliculitis is a common skin condition in which hair follicles become inflamed. It’s usually caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. At first it may look like small red bumps or white-headed pimples around hair follicles — the tiny pockets from which each hair grows. The infection can spread and turn into nonhealing, crusty sores.

The condition isn’t life-threatening, but it can be itchy, sore and embarrassing. Severe infections can cause permanent hair loss and scarring.

If someone has a mild case, it’ll likely clear in a few days with basic self-care measures. For more serious or recurring folliculitis, one may need to see a doctor.

Certain types of folliculitis are known as hot tub rash, razor bumps and barber’s itch.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Causes: Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged by friction from clothing, blockage of the follicle, or shaving. In most cases of folliculitis, the damaged follicles are then infected with the bacteria Staphylococcus (staph).

Barber’s itch is a staph infection of the hair follicles in the beard area of the face, usually the upper lip. Shaving aggravates the condition. Tinea barbae is similar to barber’s itch, but the infection is caused by a fungus.

Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder occurring primarily in black men. If curly beard hairs are cut too short, they may curve back into the skin and cause inflammation.

Most carbuncles and furuncles and other cases of folliculitis develop from Staphylococcus aureus.

Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged by friction from clothing, blockage of the follicle, or shaving. In most cases of folliculitis, the damaged follicles are then infected with the bacteria Staphylococcus (staph).

Iron deficiency anemia is sometimes associated with chronic cases

Sycosis barbae or Barber’s itch is a staph infection of the hair follicles in the bearded area of the face, usually the upper lip. Shaving aggravates the condition.

Tinea barbae is similar to barber’s itch, but the infection is caused by the fungus T._rubrum.
Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder occurring primarily in men of African descent. If curly beard hairs are cut too short, they may curve back into the skin and cause inflammation.

Hot tub folliculitis is caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa often found in new hot tubs. The folliculitis usually occurs after sitting in a hot tub that was not properly cleaned before use. Symptoms are found around the body parts that sit in the hot tub — typically the legs, hips and buttocks and surrounding areas. Symptoms are typically amplified around regions that were covered by wet clothing, such as bathing suits.

Symptoms

Common symptoms include a rash, itching, and pimples or pustules near a hair follicle in the neck, groin, or genital area. The pimples may crust over.

typically occur on neck axilla, or groin area

may be present as genital lesions

itching skin

Folliculitis signs and symptoms include:

*Clusters of small red bumps or white-headed pimples that develop around hair follicles

*Pus-filled blisters that break open and crust over

*Red and inflamed skin

*Itchy or burning skin

*Tenderness or pain

*A large swollen bump or mass

Diagnosis:   The diagnosis is primarily based on how the skin looks. If the usual treatments don’t clear up your infection, he or she may use a swab to take a sample of your infected skin. This is sent to a laboratory to help determine what’s causing the infection. Rarely, a skin biopsy may be done to rule out other conditions. Lab tests may show which bacteria or fungus is causing the infection.

Treatment:    

Treatment may include antibiotics applied to the skin (mupirocin) or taken by mouth (dicloxacillin), or antifungal medications to control the infection.

*Topical antiseptic treatment is adequate for most cases

*Some patients may benefit from systemic flucloxacillin

*Topical antibiotics such as mupirocin ointment.

Home remedies:

Mild cases of folliculitis often respond well to home care. The following self-care approaches may help relieve discomfort, speed healing and prevent an infection from spreading:

Apply a warm, moist washcloth or compress. Do this several times a day to relieve discomfort and help the area drain, if needed. Moisten the compress with a saltwater solution (1 teaspoon of table salt in 2 cups of water).

Apply over-the-counter antibiotics. Try various nonprescription infection-fighting gels, creams and washes.

Apply soothing lotions. Try relieving itchy skin with an oatmeal lotion or an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream.

Clean the affected skin. Gently wash the infected skin twice a day with antibacterial soap. Use a clean washcloth and towel each time and don’t share your towels or washcloths. Use hot, soapy water to wash these items. And wash clothing that has touched the affected area.

Protect the skin. If possible, avoid shaving. If you must shave, try an electric razor. When you’re done, rinse your skin with warm water and apply moisturizer

Prognosis:   Folliculitis usually responds well to treatment, but may recur.

Possible Complications:

  • Folliculitis may return
  • Infection may spread to other body areas

Alternative medication:-

Is there any alternative treatment for Folliculitis
Signs, symptoms and treatment of folliculitis

Treat Folliculitis alternatively

Cure your Folliculitis

Click for Homeopathic Treatment……………………………(1).………(2).……..(3)

When to Contact a Medical Professional:

Apply home treatment and call your health care provider if symptoms recur frequently, if they persist longer than 2 or 3 days, or if the infection spreads.

Prevention:

To prevent further damage to the hair follicles and infection:

  • Reduce friction from clothing.
  • Avoid shaving the area if possible (if shaving is necessary, use a clean new razor blade or an electric razor each time).
  • Keep the area clean.
  • Avoid contaminated clothing and washcloths.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000823.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folliculitis

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/folliculitis/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/con-20025909