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Herbs & Plants

Ammi majus

Botanical Name : Ammi majus
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Ammi
Species: A. majus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales

Common Names : Bishop’s flower,Bishop’s weed, False bishop’s weed,Bullwort, Greater ammi, Lady’s lace, Queen Anne’s lace or Laceflower

Habitat :Ammi majus is native to  C. Europe to W. Asia and N. Africa. A casual in Britain. Grows in waste places in Britain

Description:
Annual growing to 0.75m by 0.4m.
It is hardy to zone 0. It is in flower from June to October, and the seeds ripen from July to October.Elegant, large flat umbels of lacy white flowers grace strong uniform stems of dark fern-like foliage all summer. Stunning in borders or as a cut flower. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES…>.....(01)......(1)..…....(2)..….…(3)…......(4)
Ammi majus fruits can be distinguished by the presence of four prominent secondary ridges and by the absence of lacunae outside the vascular bundles, as seen in the transverse section of fruit. The plant is self-fertile.  Germination: 7-21 days, 65-85F. Rich, sandy soil. 40-56in.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a well-drained soil in a sunny position, succeeding in ordinary garden soil. This species is often cultivated for its attractive flowering stems which are often sold in markets. It is cultivated in India as a medicinal herb

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring or autumn in situ

Edible Uses
Edible Uses: Condiment.

Seed – used as a condiment.

Medicinal Uses:
The seed is contraceptive, diuretic and tonic. An infusion is used to calm the digestive system, whilst it is also used in the treatment of asthma and angina. A decoction of the ground-up seed, eaten after intercourse, appears able to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum in the uterus. This decoction is also used as a gargle in the treatment of toothache. The seed contains furanocoumarins (including bergapten), which stimulate pigment production in skin that is exposed to bright sunlight. The plant is widely cultivated in India for these furanocoumarins which are used in the treatment of vitiligo (piebald skin) and psoriasis.
In ancient Egypt, this plant was used to treat skin diseases. Ammi majus is being studied for potential cancer and AIDS treatments.

The seeds in an infusion or as a tincture, calm the digestive system. They are also diuretic and, like visnaga, have been used to treat asthma and angina. Bishops’ weed reputedly helps treat patchy skin pigmentation in vitiligo. It has also been used for psoriasis. The seeds in an infusion or as a tincture, calm the digestive system. They are also diuretic and, like visnaga, have been used to treat asthma and angina. Bishops’ weed reputedly helps treat patchy skin pigmentation in vitiligo. It has also been used for psoriasis.

Other Uses
Weather protection.

The root is chewed to give protection from strong sunlight. It contains 8-methoxypsoralen which stimulates production of pigment in skin exposed to U.V. light. Caution is advised, however, since it can cause side-effects. Other reports suggest that it is the seeds that are used.

Scented Plants……....Seed: Crushed Dried..……..The seed is strongly aromatic.

Known Hazards: The root contains 8-methoxypsoralen, this stimulates the production of pigmentation in skin exposed to ultra-violet light, but it can cause side-effects. Use with caution. Skin contact with the sap is said to cause photo-sensitivity and/or dermatitis in some people

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Ammi+majus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammi_majus
http://www.tmseeds.com/product/Ammi-Majus-Graceland/Shop_Annual_Flower_Seed

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammi_majus

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Herbs & Plants

Oxalis violacea

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Botanical Name :Oxalis violacea
Family: Oxalidaceae
Genus: Oxalis
Species: O. violacea
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Oxalidales

Common Names: violet wood sorrel

Habitat:Oxalis violacea  is native to  Eastern N. America – New York to Wisconsin, south to Florida. It  grows in Woods, shaded slopes, gravelly banks and prairies. Dry sandy or clay soils.

Description:
Oxalis violacea, the violet woodsorrel, is a perennial plant. It  is a low-lying (4″), shy native with small, bell-shaped violet flowers that become white with greenish lines near the blossom’s throat. Leaves and blossoms both open up to the sun, the latter exposing bright yellow anthers, and then fold with shade. Three oval-heart leaflets comprise each leaf. Bees love this plant, which prefers well-drained soils.from BULB.( in appearance to small clovers such as the shamrock, the plant bears violet colored flowers among three-parted leaves having heart-shaped leaflets. Wood sorrel emerges in early spring from an underground bulb.)

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

. It is in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

Spread: 0.5 to 0.75 feet,Bloom Time: May, Bloom Color: Pink, Lavender , Bloom Description: Pink, lavender, Sun: Full sun to part shade.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
Easily grown in a moisture-retentive humus-rich soil in shade or dappled sunlight.  Succeeds in dry soils. Grows well in a wild or woodland garden.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Edible Uses
All parts of the plant are edible; flowers, leaves, stems and bulb.

Leaves – raw or cooked. The acid salty leaves are eaten raw in salads and sandwiches or cooked as a potherb.Use in moderation, see notes at top of sheet. Flowers – raw. An attractive and tasty garnish for salads[183]. Root – raw or cooked. A lemon-flavoured drink is made from the leaves.

Medicinal Uses:
Anthelmintic;  Antiemetic;  Blood purifier;  Cancer;  Salve.

The plant is anthelmintic, antiemetic, blood purifier, cancer and salve. A cold infusion is used to stop a person vomiting. An infusion can be used as a blood purifier, it is said to be a treatment in the early stages of cancer. An infusion of the plant is drunk and also used as a wash in treating children with hookworm. An infusion of the leaves, mixed with oil, can be used as a salve on sores.

In New Mexico, a teaspoonful of fresh or dried powdered leaves is boiled in a cup of water and taken in the morning to help expel intestinal worms.  The raw greens have been eaten in the early spring as a blood tonic, after a winter without greens.  The plant has been used to create a feeling of coolness in a person with fever, and to increase urine flow.  A cold infusion is used to stop a person vomiting. An infusion can be used as a blood purifier, it is said to be a treatment in the early stages of cancer. An infusion of the plant is drunk and also used as a wash in treating children with hookworm. An infusion of the leaves, mixed with oil, can be used as a salve on sores.

Known Hazards:
The leaves contain oxalic acid, which gives them their sharp flavour. Perfectly all right in small quantities, the leaves should not be eaten in large amounts since oxalic acid can bind up the body’s supply of calcium leading to nutritional deficiency. The quantity of oxalic acid will be reduced if the leaves are cooked. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones or hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet since it can aggravate their condition

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Oxalis+violacea
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis_violacea
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

https://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/oxalis-violacea-violet-wood-sorrel.html

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Ranunculus pennsylvanicus

Botanical Name : Ranunculus pennsylvanicus
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Ranunculus
Species: R. pensylvanicus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Synonyms : Ranunculus pensylvanicus

Common Names:Pennsylvania Buttercup, Bristly Buttercup,Bristly Crowfoot

Habitat : Ranunculus pennsylvanicus   is native to Northern N. America – Labrador to Alaska and south to Colorado. It grows  in  the   wet meadows, alluvium, ditches etc. Stream banks, bogs, moist clearings, depressions in woodlands from sea level to 1700 metres

Description:
Ranunculus pennsylvanicus is an    annual/perennial   herbs, or woody climbers  growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) with acrid  sap.  Leaves usually alternate, sometimes opposite; simple or compound, with clasping or dilated base; stipules none. Flowers    hypogynous, actinomorphic or sometimes zygomorphic, bisporangiate or occasionally monosporangiate; perianth of similar
segments or differentiated into calyx and corolla; capels usually  separate; stamens numerous. Fruit an achene, follicle or berry. It is in flower from Jun to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

CLICK &  SEE  THE  PICTURES

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist or wet soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most areas of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a moist loamy soil. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

Edible Uses: Leaves – cooked. The leaves contain toxins but in too low a concentration to be harmful.

Medicinal Uses:The plant is rubefacient. It is used to raise blisters

Other Uses :
The entire plant can be boiled to yield a red dye. It is mixed with the bark of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) which acts to fix the colour. The entire plant can be boiled with rushes (Juncus spp) or flags (Iris spp and Acorus calamus) to colour them yellow for use in making mats, baskets etc.

Known Hazards : Although no specific record of toxicity has been found for this plant, many if not all members of this genus are poisonous. These toxins can be destroyed by heat or by drying. Many if not all plants in this genus also have a strongly acrid juice that can cause blistering to the skin.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://www.kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/1811/1936/V17N04_106.pdf?sequence=1
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ranunculus%20pennsylvanicus
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://www.wnmu.edu/academic/nspages/gilaflora/ranunculus_pennsylvanicus.html

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Curlytop Knotweed

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Botanical Name : Polygonum lapathifolium – L.
Family : Polygonaceae
Genus  : Polygonum
Synonyms   : Persicaria lapathifolia – (L.)S.F.Gray., Polygonum scabrum – Moench.

Habitat : Temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, including Britain. S. Africa.  Swampy thickets, shores, damp clearings and cultivated fields in N. America

Description:
Curlytop Knotweed is an erect, annual  herb, 2′-5′ tall forb; stems with nodes either smooth or cut, but not hairy; taprooted.Flowers are  white-green to pink, 4- or 5-parted, 1/8″ long, petals and petal-like sepals connected at the base; inflorescence many 1/3″-2″ long, nodding, spike-like clusters on a stalk jointed at the top; blooms July-Sept.They are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.) Fruits are  dry seed flat or concave on both sides. Leaves are  alternate, variable but usually lance-like, often woolly beneath.

 

click to see the pictures..>…...(01)...(1).…...(2)...(3).….(4)....
It is hardy to zone 5. .
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist or wet soil.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in an ordinary garden soil  but prefers a moisture retentive not too fertile soil in sun or part shade. Repays generous treatment . Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is usually free and easy. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer if they have reached sufficient size. If not, overwinter them in a cold frame and plant them out the following spring after the last expected frosts.

 

Edible Uses:Young leaves – raw or cooked. Seed – raw or cooked. It is rather small and fiddly to utilize.

Medicinal Uses:
Antiseptic; Astringent; Febrifuge; Stomachic.

The whole plant is antiseptic and astringent. An infusion has been used in the treatment of stomach complaints and fevers. The plant produces a soft white mass, a froth like that of soap. It is applied externally to burns.

Other Uses: The plant produces a soft white mass, a froth like that of soap. It is used for bathing and washing clothes.

Known Hazards : Although no specific mention has been made for this species, there have been reports that some members of this genus can cause photosensitivity in susceptible people. Many species also contain oxalic acid (the distinctive lemony flavour of sorrel) – whilst not toxic this substance can bind up other minerals making them unavailable to the body and leading to mineral deficiency. Having said that, a number of common foods such as sorrel and rhubarb contain oxalic acid and the leaves of most members of this genus are nutritious and beneficial to eat in moderate quantities. Cooking the leaves will reduce their content of oxalic acid. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones or hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet since it can aggravate their condition

Resources:
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Polygonum+lapathifolium
http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Polygonum+lapathifolium
http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/scripts/detail.asp?SpCode=POLLAP

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