Tag Archives: Euphorbia hirta

Asmatica

 

Botanical Name : Tylophora asmatica
Family : Apocynaceae
Genus : Tylophora
Species: Asmatica
Common names :  Indian lobelia   asmatica,asmitica
Parts Used : Leaves
Habitat :Grows in tropical countries.Native to the Indian subcontinent, asmatica grows wild on the plains of India.

Description:
The Tylophora is a perennial vine, twining climber with lance-shaped leaves and greenish flowers that produce many flat seeds. The leaves are gathered when the plant is in flower.
The leaves and roots of tylophora have been included in the Bengal Pharmacopoeia since 1884. It is said to have laxative, expectorant, diaphoretic (sweating), and purgative (vomiting) properties. It has been used for the treatment of various respiratory problems besides asthma, including allergies, bronchitis and colds, as well as dysentery and oseteoarthritis pain.

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History:
Asmatica has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine to induce vomiting and expectoration as well as for treating dysentery and rheumatic conditions.

Extensive laboratory research and clinical study has taken place in India and established that asmatica is an effective remedy for asthma. In the 1970s, a number of clinical trials showed that a majority of asthmatics taking the herb for just six days, gained relief for an additional twelve weeks.

It should be noted that the spelling of this plant, asmatica, differs from the asthmatic plant (Euphorbia hirta syn.E. pilulifera) and should not be confused with it although it does have a history of similar usage.

Cultivation
Propagule  Various Pollination method .

Chemical Constituents: Alkaloids (including tylophorine) ,flavonoids ,sterols ,tannins

Medicinal properties: antiasthmatic

Medicinal Uses:
Tylophora asmatica has been traditionally used as an antiasthmatic. Asmatica (sometimes called Indian lobelia) is only to be administered with proper professional knowledge. Herbal remedies are only prepared from the leaves.

Considered a specific remedy for asthma, asmatica may relieve symptoms for up to 3 months.  It is also beneficial in cases of hay fever, and is prescribed for acute allergic problems such as eczema and nettle rash.  The plant holds potential as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome and other immune system disorders.  Asmatica may relieve rheumatoid arthritis and may also be of value in the treatment of cancer.  Extensive laboratory and clinical research in India has established that asmatica is an effective remedy for asthma.  In the 1970s, a number of clinical trials showed that a majority of asthmatic patients taking the herb for just 6 days gained relief from asthma for up to a further 12 weeks.  However, the leaves do produce side effects  The plant’s alternative name, Indian lobelia, alludes not only to its value in treating asthma but also to its irritating effect on the digestive tract.
It is also beneficial in cases of hay fever as well as such acute allergic problems as eczema and nettle rash.

The plant holds promise as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome and other immune system disorders. It may also relieve rheumatoid arthritis and be of value in the treatment of cancer.

Other Traditional uses :
Parts used  Traditional uses for  Fragrance  intensity. Dye parts  Dye color
Cautions:
*Take only under professional guidance.
*Like its lobelia relatives, the leaves of asmatica do produce side effects and can have an irritating effect on the digestive tract.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.crescentbloom.com/Plants/Specimen/TU/Tylophora%20asmatica.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

http://www.innvista.com/health/herbs/asmatica.htm

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Euphorbia Hirta

Botanical Name: Euphorbia Hirta
Family:    Euphorbiaceae
Genus:    Euphorbia
Species:E. hirta
Kingdom:Plantae
Order:Malpighiales

Synonym: Euphorbia pilulifera.

Common Names: Cats hair, asthma weed, basri dudhi, chara, malnommee, pill – bearing spurge, patikan kerbau, patikan kebo, fei yang cao, gelang susu, amampat chaiarisi, erva de santa luzia, fei-yang ts’ao, Dugudhika, snakeweed.
Vernacular Names::
English: pill-bearing spurge, asthma plant, hairy spurge, garden spurge, pillpod sandman [
Bengali: boro-keruie, barokhervi
Gujarati: dudeli
Hawaiian: Koko kahiki
Hindi: baridhudi, dudh ghas, dudhi
Luganda: kasandanda
Sanskrit: chara, amampatchairasi, barokheruie
Tagalog: tawa-tawa, gatas-gatas
Twi: Kaka wie adwie
Kinaray-a: tawa-tawa
Tamil: amampatchaiarisi
Telugu: reddivari nanabalu, reddinananbrolu, bidarie
Urdu: lal dodhak

Habitat: Euphorbia Hirta  is native to India. It is a hairy herb that grows in open grasslands, roadsides and pathways.
Description:
Euphorbia Hirta is an erect or prostrate annual herb which can get up to 60 cm long with a solid, hairy stem that produced an abundant white latex.[2] There are stipules present. The leaves are simple, elliptical, hairy (on both upper and lower surfaces but particularly on the veins on the lower leaf surface), with a finely dentate margin. Leaves occur in opposite pairs on the stem. The flowers are unisexual and found in axillary cymes at each leaf node. They lack petals and are generally on a stalk. The fruit is a capsules with three valves and produces tiny, oblong, four-sided red seeds. It has a white or brown taproot.

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Cultivation :
Prefers a light well-drained moderately rich loam in an open sunny position. The plant is not very tolerant of frost, though it can probably be grown successfully in this country as a spring-sown annual. Hybridizes with other members of this genus. The ripe seed is released explosively from the seed capsules. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits. This genus has been singled out as a potential source of latex (for making rubber) for the temperate zone, although no individual species has been singled out.
Propagation :
Seed – sow mid to late spring in situ. It might be best to sow the seed in a cool greenhouse in early March and plant out the seedlings in late May, this will give the plants longer to grow and mature.

CONTAINS: Glycoside, alkaloids, sterols, tannins, phorbic acid. Camphol, leucocyanidol, quercitol, quercitrin and a quercitol derivative containing rhamnose and a chlorophenolic acid. Though reported to contain HCN, the plants have been generally negative cyanogenetic in testing. The irritating latex contains euphorbon.
The dry herb yields gallic acid, a phenol-like substance, an alcohol euphosterol and a trace of alkaloid (upto 2% xanthorhamnin).
Whole herb yields taraxerol and taraxerone. Also: resin, calcium, wax, calcium malate, lignin, basorin, volatile oil.

Most spurges contain diterpene esters which are carcinogenic, highly irritant and purgative. E. hirta, however, is ester-free and considered a safe remedy in Traditonal Chinese Medicine (TCM). This plant was listed in the NF 1916-47 as having some reputation as an anti-asthmatic.
An annual plant which is common to all tropical countries. Slender, hairy stem and lanceolate opposite toothed leaves; small yellow flowers that occur in dense clusters in the leaf axils, producing small reddish wrinkled seeds; the plant produces a milk latex which is irritating to mucous membranes.

MEDICINAL  Uses:
It  has lactogenic properties.
Used against asthma, bronchitis, worm infestation, conjunctivitis and dysentery. The latex of the plant is used for warts and cuts. It also has lactogenic properties.
NB: A test done in China using a 20% preparation of the neutral saponins from this herb were injected intramuscularly for the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. More than half of the 64 patients studied either were completely cured or markedly improved. Results whose esophageal tumors remained unreduced in size were able to swallow food more easily. It is believed that the tumors may have been softened by the saponins in the herb.

Acrid, bitter, cool, slightly toxic, antiseptic that expels phlegm and relieves spasms; extracts are spasmolytic and antihistaminic. Also, anti-inflammatory. Affects colon, spleen, lung, large intestine.
Specific in Traditional Chinese Medicine for destroying the organism which causes amoebic dysentery.
Decoction has been used for asthmatic conditions, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema; the tincture is used in coryza and hay fever.
Has been used internally for asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, nervous cough (for relaxing the larynx), excess mucous, hay fever, and amoebic dysentery; combined with Grindelia camporum (gumplant) for asthma and bronchitis.
Juice has been used externally for warts; whole plant is used externally for burns.
Has been used in Chinese medicine: the stem is utilized for asthma and bronchitis; whole plant is decocted for athlete’s foot, dysentery, enteritis, fever, gas, itch and skin conditions.
Other medical disciplines regard it as anodyne, depuritive, diuretic, lactagogue, purgative and vermifuge. It is used for asthma, bronchitis, calculus, colic, cough, dysentery, dyspnea, eruptions, excrescences, eyelids, fever, flu, fractures, gonorrhea, headache, hypertension, itch, measles, nausea, opthalmia, skin ailments, sores, splinters, stomach ache, tumors, urogenital ailments, warts and wounds.

DOSE = TRADITIONAL DOSAGES FOR PROFESSIONAL NOTE ONLY
!All others buy commercial preparations and follow directions carefully!
DRIED HERB = 0.1 to 1/3 gram 3 times per day
INFUSION = 1 cup boiling water over 1/2 to 1 tsp dried leaves and steeped for 10 to 15 minutes; taken 3 times daily.
DECOCTION = Please note, decoction is made in a 1 to 40 ratio and taken 1 Tbsp at a time.
FLUID EXTRACT = 1/2 to 1 drachm
TINCTURE = 1 to 2 ml taken 3 times daily.

HOMEOPATHIC:
Used for Humid asthma, cardiac dyspnea, hay fever, bronchitis, urethritis with intense pain on urinating and with much urging. Acrid leucorrhea. Hemorrhages from sunstroke and traumatism.
DOSE is 3rd to 6th potency.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

References:
http://earthnotes.tripod.com/asthmaweed.htm
http://www.tropilab.com/astmaweed.html
http://www.gardenbed.com/E/1582.cfm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_hirta