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Caffeine Eases Exercise-Induced Asthma

Caffeine taken within an hour of exercise can reduce symptoms of exercise induced asthma (EIA), characterised by shortness of breath  during sustained aerobic activity.

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A large dose equal to nine mg of caffeine per kg of body weight was as effective as an albuterol inhaler in treating or preventing EIA. Smaller amounts also reduced wheezing, coughing and other symptoms of EIA.

Timothy Mickleborough, study co-investigator at Indiana University said no additional benefit was found when caffeine was combined with an albuterol inhaler.

Mickleborough and colleagues have been investigating the efficacy of a number of nutritional factors.

His research has shown that a diet high in fish oil and antioxidants and low in salt has the potential to reduce the severity of EIA and perhaps reduce the reliance on pharmacotherapy.

This is especially important since prolonged use of daily medications can result in reduced effectiveness, and there is growing concern about the potential side effects of inhaled corticosteroid use.

The study was presented at the American College of Sports Medicine conference in Indiana during the Respiratory Session.

Source: The Times Of India

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Sweaty People Less Prone to Asthma

Perspiration does more than just keeping the body cool — it cuts the risk of exercise-related asthma, a new study has revealed.

..A new benefit from sweating?->.

An international team has carried out the study and found that people who sweat less when exercising are actually more likely to develop breathing problems — the reason could be there is too little fluid in their airways.

“It now appears that how much fluid your airways secrete could be a key determinant in protecting you from exercise-induced asthma. So, if athletes sweat, drool, or cry, at least they won’t gasp,” the British media quoted lead researcher Dr Warren Lockette as saying.

In fact, in their study, the researchers led by the University of Michigan looked at 56 volunteers suspected of having the condition before coming to the conclusion that sweating makes people less prone to asthma.

The team measured the subjects’ responses to a drug called pilocarpine, which induces sweat and saliva production, and another which constricts the airways in people with exercise-induced asthma.

Those who had the greatest response to the airway drug tended to have the lowest response to the sweating drug and vice versa.

Even without the help of the drug the researchers found a correlation in their subjects between the amount they actually sweated and the amount of saliva as well as tear secretion.

Sources: The Times Of India

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