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Indian Redwood Cure for Cancer

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………....CLICK & SEE
A substance found in the roots of Indian redwood (commonly known as Rohan), or soymida febrifuga, may help treat severe forms of blood and bone marrow cancers, researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, have found.

 

IISc biochemists, led by Sathees Raghavan, discovered that the compound — methyl angolensate — found in the roots of the Indian redwood tree (which grows in most parts of the country) was very effective in killing blood and bone marrow cancer cells in a lab experiment.

Cancers like leukaemia and lymphoma, triggered by chromosomal aberrations, are life threatening and very difficult to treat unless diagnosed very early. Moreover, the drugs that are currently in use against these tumours are toxic, and don’t spare normal cells.

The plant extract was found to be very effective and had no side effects, the IISc scientists reported recently, online, in the journal FEBS Letters.

This was first study to explore the anti-cancer properties of the compound. Used in many ayurvedic preparations, the extract is known to be effective against malaria, ulcer and inflammation of different body organs.

According to Raghavan, the study is one of the most sophisticated ones to be conducted, as the researchers have been able to pinpoint the exact mechanisms by which it seeks to kill the tumour cells.

Typically, any drug used for treating cancers does this, either by checking the runaway proliferation of cancer cells, thus helping the body’s immunity effectively counter the problem, or making tumour cells commit suicide, a process called apoptosis.

“We were surprised that methyl angolensate does both,” Raghavan told KnowHow. While they haven’t studied the inhibition of tumour cell proliferation yet, they have worked out in detail the cellular mechanisms that the compound employs to induce the suicide of the cancerous cells.

Raghavan said it was too early to talk about the effectiveness of the compound in humans. They have to conduct a number of tests to confirm the safety and effectiveness. The IISc scientists have proceeded in this direction by launching animal studies using mice.

Sources: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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Black Raspberries Slow Cancer by Altering Hundreds of Genes

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New research strongly suggests that a mix of preventative agents found in concentrated black raspberries could more effectively inhibit cancer development than single agents aimed at shutting down a particular gene.

click & see the pictures

Researchers examined the effect of freeze-dried black raspberries on genes altered by a chemical carcinogen in an animal model of esophageal cancer. The carcinogen affected the activity of 2,200 genes in the animals’ esophagus in only one week. However, 460 of those genes were restored to normal activity in animals that consumed freeze-dried black raspberry powder.

Black raspberries contain many vitamins, minerals, phenols and phytosterols, which are known to individually prevent cancer in animals.
Sources:
Science Blog August 28, 2008
Cancer Research August 1, 2008, 68, 6460-6467

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Peptic Ulcer

Definition:
Peptic ulcers are open sores that develop on the inside lining of your stomach, upper small intestine or esophagus. The most common symptom of a peptic ulcer is pain.Not long ago, the common belief was that peptic ulcers were a result of lifestyle. Doctors now know that a bacterial infection or some medications — not stress or diet — cause most ulcers of the stomach and upper part of the small intestine (duodenum). Esophageal ulcers also may occur and are typically associated with the reflux of stomach acid.

click to see the pictures.>.…..(01)..….(1)…...(2)……...(3).……..(4)...

A peptic ulcer, also known as PUD or peptic ulcer disease, is an ulcer (defined as mucosal erosions equal to or greater than 0.5 cm) of an area of the gastrointestinal tract that is usually acidic and thus extremely painful. As much as 80% of ulcers are associated with Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped bacterium that lives in the acidic environment of the stomach, however only 20% of those cases go to a doctor. Ulcers can also be caused or worsened by drugs such as Aspirin and other NSAIDs. Contrary to general belief, more peptic ulcers arise in the duodenum (first part of the small intestine, just after the stomach) than in the stomach. About 4% of stomach ulcers are caused by a malignant tumor, so multiple biopsies are needed to make sure. Duodenal ulcers are generally benign.

Classification

A peptic ulcer may arise at various locations:

* Stomach (called gastric ulcer)
* Duodenum (called duodenal ulcer)
* Esophagus (called esophageal ulcer)
* Meckel’s Diverticulum (called Meckel’s Diverticulum ulcer)

Signs and symptoms:

Burning pain is the most common peptic ulcer symptom. The pain is caused by the ulcer and is aggravated by stomach acid coming in contact with the ulcerated area. The pain typically may:

* Be felt anywhere from your navel to your breastbone
* Last from a few minutes to many hours
* Be worse when your stomach is empty
* Flare at night
* Often be temporarily relieved by eating certain foods that buffer stomach acid or by taking an acid-reducing medication
* Come and go for a few days or weeks

Less often, ulcers may cause severe signs or symptoms such as:

* The vomiting of blood — which may appear red or black
* Dark blood in stools or stools that are black or tarry
* Nausea or vomiting
* Unexplained weight loss
* Chest pain

A history of heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and use of certain forms of medication can raise the suspicion for peptic ulcer. Medicines associated with peptic ulcer include NSAID (non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs) that inhibit cyclooxygenase, and most glucocorticoids (e.g. dexamethasone and prednisolone).

In patients over 45 with more than 2 weeks of the above symptoms, the odds for peptic ulceration are high enough to warrant rapid investigation by EGD (see below).

The timing of the symptoms in relation to the meal may differentiate between gastric and duodenal ulcers: A gastric ulcer would give epigastric pain during the meal, as gastric acid is secreted, or after the meal, as the alkaline duodenal contents reflux into the stomach. Symptoms of duodenal ulcers would manifest mostly before the meal — when acid (production stimulated by hunger) is passed into the duodenum. However, this is not a reliable sign in clinical practice.
Causes:
Depending on their location, peptic ulcers have different names:

* Gastric ulcer. This is a peptic ulcer that occurs in your stomach.
* Duodenal ulcer. This type of peptic ulcer develops in the first part of the small intestine (duodenum).
* Esophageal ulcer. An esophageal ulcer is usually located in the lower section of your esophagus. It’s often associated with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

The culprit in most cases
Although stress and spicy foods were once thought to be the main causes of peptic ulcers, doctors now know that the cause of most ulcers is the corkscrew-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori).

H. pylori lives and multiplies within the mucous layer that covers and protects tissues that line the stomach and small intestine. Often, H. pylori causes no problems. But sometimes it can disrupt the mucous layer and inflame the lining of the stomach or duodenum, producing an ulcer. One reason may be that people who develop peptic ulcers already have damage to the lining of the stomach or small intestine, making it easier for bacteria to invade and inflame tissues.

H. pylori is a common gastrointestinal infection around the world. In the United States, one in five people younger than 30 and half the people older than 60 are infected. Although it’s not clear exactly how H. pylori spreads, it may be transmitted from person to person by close contact, such as kissing. People may also contract H. pylori through food and water.

H. pylori is the most common, but not the only, cause of peptic ulcers. Besides H. pylori, other causes of peptic ulcers, or factors that may aggravate them, include:

*Regular use of pain relievers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can irritate or inflame the lining of your stomach and small intestine. The medications are available both by prescription and over-the-counter. Nonprescription NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) and ketoprofen (Orudis KT). To help avoid digestive upset, take NSAIDs with meals.

NSAIDs inhibit production of an enzyme (cyclooxygenase) that produces prostaglandins. These hormone-like substances help protect your stomach lining from chemical and physical injury. Without this protection, stomach acid can erode the lining, causing bleeding and ulcers.
* Smoking. Nicotine in tobacco increases the volume and concentration of stomach acid, increasing your risk of an ulcer. Smoking may also slow healing during ulcer treatment.
* Excessive alcohol consumption. Alcohol can irritate and erode the mucous lining of your stomach and increases the amount of stomach acid that’s produced. It’s uncertain, however, whether this alone can progress into an ulcer or whether other contributing factors must be present, such as H. pylori bacteria or ulcer-causing medications, such as NSAIDs.
* Stress. Although stress per se isn’t a cause of peptic ulcers, it’s a contributing factor. Stress may aggravate symptoms of peptic ulcers and, in some cases, delay healing. You may undergo stress for a number of reasons — an emotionally disturbing circumstance or event, surgery, or a physical trauma, such as a burn or other severe injury.

Complications:

* Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common complication. Sudden large bleeding can be life threatening[2]. It occurs when the ulcer erodes one of the blood vessels.
* Perforation (a hole in the wall) often leads to catastrophic consequences. Erosion of the gastro-intestinal wall by the ulcer leads to spillage of stomach or intestinal content into abdominal cavity. Perforation at the anterior surface of stomach leads to acute peritonitis, initially chemical and later bacterial peritonitis. Often first sign is sudden intense abdominal pain. Posterior wall perforation leads to pancreatitis; pain in this situation often radiates to back.
* Penetration is when the ulcer continues into adjacent organs such as liver and pancreas[3].
* Scarring and swelling due to ulcers causes narrowing in the duodenum and gastric outlet obstruction. Patient often presents with severe vomiting.
* Pyloric Stenosis

Diagnosis:
n order to detect an ulcer, your doctor may have you undergo the following diagnostic tests:

* Upper gastrointestinal (upper GI) X-ray. Your doctor may begin with this test, which outlines your esophagus, stomach and duodenum. During the X-ray, you swallow a white, metallic liquid (containing barium) that coats your digestive tract and makes an ulcer more visible. An upper GI X-ray can detect some ulcers, but not all.
* Endoscopy. This procedure may follow an upper GI X-ray if the X-ray suggests a possible ulcer, or your doctor may perform endoscopy first. In this more sensitive procedure, a long, narrow tube with an attached camera is threaded down your throat and esophagus into your stomach and duodenum. With this instrument, your doctor can view your upper digestive tract and identify an ulcer.

If your doctor detects an ulcer, he or she may remove small tissue samples (biopsy) near the ulcer. These samples are examined under a microscope to rule out cancer. A biopsy can also identify the presence of H. pylori in your stomach lining. Depending on where the ulcer is found, your doctor may recommend a repeat endoscopy after two to three months to confirm that the ulcer is healing.

Additional tests
In addition to a biopsy, these other tests can determine if the cause of your ulcer is H. pylori infection:

* Blood test. This test checks for the presence of H. pylori antibodies. A disadvantage of this test is that it sometimes can’t differentiate between past exposure and current infection. After H. pylori bacteria have been eradicated, you may still have a positive result for many months.
* Breath test. This procedure uses a radioactive carbon atom to detect H. pylori. First, you blow into a small plastic bag, which is then sealed. Then, you drink a small glass of clear, tasteless liquid. The liquid contains radioactive carbon as part of a substance (urea) that will be broken down by H. pylori. Thirty minutes later, you blow into a second bag, which also is sealed. If you’re infected with H. pylori, your second breath sample will contain the radioactive carbon in the form of carbon dioxide.

The advantage of the breath test is that it can monitor the effectiveness of treatment used to eradicate H. pylori, detecting when the bacteria have been killed or eradicated. With the blood test, H. pylori antibodies may sometimes still be present a year or more after the infection is gone.
* Stool antigen test. This test checks for H. pylori in stool samples. It’s useful both in helping to diagnose H. pylori infection and in monitoring the success of treatment.

Treatment:
Younger patients with ulcer-like symptoms are often treated with antacids or H2 antagonists before EGD is undertaken. Bismuth compounds may actually reduce or even clear organisms.

Patients who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) may also be prescribed a prostaglandin analogue (Misoprostol) in order to help prevent peptic ulcers, which may be a side-effect of the NSAIDs.

When H. pylori infection is present, the most effective treatments are combinations of 2 antibiotics (e.g. Clarithromycin, Amoxicillin, Tetracycline, Metronidazole) and 1 proton pump inhibitor (PPI), sometimes together with a bismuth compound. In complicated, treatment-resistant cases, 3 antibiotics (e.g. amoxicillin + clarithromycin + metronidazole) may be used together with a PPI and sometimes with bismuth compound. An effective first-line therapy for uncomplicated cases would be Amoxicillin + Metronidazole + Rabeprazole (a PPI). In the absence of H. pylori, long-term higher dose PPIs are often used.

Treatment of H. pylori usually leads to clearing of infection, relief of symptoms and eventual healing of ulcers. Recurrence of infection can occur and retreatment may be required, if necessary with other antibiotics. Since the widespread use of PPI’s in the 1990s, surgical procedures (like “highly selective vagotomy”) for uncomplicated peptic ulcers became obsolete.

Perforated peptic ulcer is a surgical emergency and requires surgical repair of the perforation. Most bleeding ulcers require endoscopy urgently to stop bleeding with cautery or injection.

Click to see:->Homeopathic Treatment for Peptic Ulcer

>Ayurvedic-Integrated Medical Treatment

> Natural way to cure peptic ulcer

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peptic_ulcer
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/peptic-ulcer/DS00242

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The Digestive System and How It Works

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The digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus(see the figure below) . Inside this tube is a lining called the mucosa. In the mouth, stomach, and small intestine, the mucosa contains tiny glands that produce juices to help digest food…..click & see

Two solid organs, the liver and the pancreas, produce digestive juices that reach the intestine through small tubes. In addition, parts of other organ systems (for instance, nerves and blood) play a major role in the digestive system.

Why is digestion important?

When we eat such things as bread, meat, and vegetables, they are not in a form that the body can use as nourishment. Our food and drink must be changed into smaller molecules of nutrients before they can be absorbed into the blood and carried to cells throughout the body. Digestion is the process by which food and drink are broken down into their smallest parts so that the body can use them to build and nourish cells and to provide energy.

How is food digested?

Digestion involves the mixing of food, its movement through the digestive tract, and the chemical breakdown of the large molecules of food into smaller molecules. Digestion begins in the mouth, when we chew and swallow, and is completed in the small intestine. The chemical process varies somewhat for different kinds of food.

Movement of Food Through the System

The large, hollow organs of the digestive system contain muscle that enables their walls to move. The movement of organ walls can propel food and liquid and also can mix the contents within each organ. Typical movement of the esophagus, stomach, and intestine is called peristalsis. The action of peristalsis looks like an ocean wave moving through the muscle. The muscle of the organ produces a narrowing and then propels the narrowed portion slowly down the length of the organ. These waves of narrowing push the food and fluid in front of them through each hollow organ.

click & see

The first major muscle movement occurs when food or liquid is swallowed. Although we are able to start swallowing by choice, once the swallow begins, it becomes involuntary and proceeds under the control of the nerves.

The esophagus is the organ into which the swallowed food is pushed. It connects the throat above with the stomach below. At the junction of the esophagus and stomach, there is a ringlike valve closing the passage between the two organs. However, as the food approaches the closed ring, the surrounding muscles relax and allow the food to pass.

The food then enters the stomach, which has three mechanical tasks to do. First, the stomach must store the swallowed food and liquid. This requires the muscle of the upper part of the stomach to relax and accept large volumes of swallowed material. The second job is to mix up the food, liquid, and digestive juice produced by the stomach. The lower part of the stomach mixes these materials by its muscle action. The third task of the stomach is to empty its contents slowly into the small intestine.

Several factors affect emptying of the stomach, including the nature of the food (mainly its fat and protein content) and the degree of muscle action of the emptying stomach and the next organ to receive the contents (the small intestine). As the food is digested in the small intestine and dissolved into the juices from the pancreas, liver, and intestine, the contents of the intestine are mixed and pushed forward to allow further digestion.

Finally, all of the digested nutrients are absorbed through the intestinal walls. The waste products of this process include undigested parts of the food, known as fiber, and older cells that have been shed from the mucosa. These materials are propelled into the colon, where they remain, usually for a day or two, until the feces are expelled by a bowel movement.

Production of Digestive Juices

The glands that act first are in the mouth—the salivary glands. Saliva produced by these glands contains an enzyme that begins to digest the starch from food into smaller molecules.

The next set of digestive glands is in the stomach lining. They produce stomach acid and an enzyme that digests protein. One of the unsolved puzzles of the digestive system is why the acid juice of the stomach does not dissolve the tissue of the stomach itself. In most people, the stomach mucosa is able to resist the juice, although food and other tissues of the body cannot.

After the stomach empties the food and juice mixture into the small intestine, the juices of two other digestive organs mix with the food to continue the process of digestion. One of these organs is the pancreas. It produces a juice that contains a wide array of enzymes to break down the carbohydrate, fat, and protein in food. Other enzymes that are active in the process come from glands in the wall of the intestine or even a part of that wall.

The liver produces yet another digestive juice—bile. The bile is stored between meals in the gallbladder. At mealtime, it is squeezed out of the gallbladder into the bile ducts to reach the intestine and mix with the fat in our food. The bile acids dissolve the fat into the watery contents of the intestine, much like detergents that dissolve grease from a frying pan. After the fat is dissolved, it is digested by enzymes from the pancreas and the lining of the intestine.

Absorption and Transport of Nutrients

Digested molecules of food, as well as water and minerals from the diet, are absorbed from the cavity of the upper small intestine. Most absorbed materials cross the mucosa into the blood and are carried off in the bloodstream to other parts of the body for storage or further chemical change. As already noted, this part of the process varies with different types of nutrients.

Carbohydrates. It is recommended that about 55 to 60 percent of total daily calories be from carbohydrates. Some of our most common foods contain mostly carbohydrates. Examples are bread, potatoes, legumes, rice, spaghetti, fruits, and vegetables. Many of these foods contain both starch and fiber.

The digestible carbohydrates are broken into simpler molecules by enzymes in the saliva, in juice produced by the pancreas, and in the lining of the small intestine. Starch is digested in two steps: First, an enzyme in the saliva and pancreatic juice breaks the starch into molecules called maltose; then an enzyme in the lining of the small intestine (maltase) splits the maltose into glucose molecules that can be absorbed into the blood. Glucose is carried through the bloodstream to the liver, where it is stored or used to provide energy for the work of the body.

Table sugar is another carbohydrate that must be digested to be useful. An enzyme in the lining of the small intestine digests table sugar into glucose and fructose, each of which can be absorbed from the intestinal cavity into the blood. Milk contains yet another type of sugar, lactose, which is changed into absorbable molecules by an enzyme called lactase, also found in the intestinal lining.

Protein. Foods such as meat, eggs, and beans consist of giant molecules of protein that must be digested by enzymes before they can be used to build and repair body tissues. An enzyme in the juice of the stomach starts the digestion of swallowed protein. Further digestion of the protein is completed in the small intestine. Here, several enzymes from the pancreatic juice and the lining of the intestine carry out the breakdown of huge protein molecules into small molecules called amino acids. These small molecules can be absorbed from the hollow of the small intestine into the blood and then be carried to all parts of the body to build the walls and other parts of cells.

Fats. Fat molecules are a rich source of energy for the body. The first step in digestion of a fat such as butter is to dissolve it into the watery content of the intestinal cavity. The bile acids produced by the liver act as natural detergents to dissolve fat in water and allow the enzymes to break the large fat molecules into smaller molecules, some of which are fatty acids and cholesterol. The bile acids combine with the fatty acids and cholesterol and help these molecules to move into the cells of the mucosa. In these cells the small molecules are formed back into large molecules, most of which pass into vessels (called lymphatics) near the intestine. These small vessels carry the reformed fat to the veins of the chest, and the blood carries the fat to storage depots in different parts of the body.

Vitamins. Another vital part of our food that is absorbed from the small intestine is the class of chemicals we call vitamins. The two different types of vitamins are classified by the fluid in which they can be dissolved: water-soluble vitamins (all the B vitamins and vitamin C) and fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins A, D, and K).

Water and salt. Most of the material absorbed from the cavity of the small intestine is water in which salt is dissolved. The salt and water come from the food and liquid we swallow and the juices secreted by the many digestive glands.

How is the digestive process controlled?

Hormone Regulators

A fascinating feature of the digestive system is that it contains its own regulators. The major hormones that control the functions of the digestive system are produced and released by cells in the mucosa of the stomach and small intestine. These hormones are released into the blood of the digestive tract, travel back to the heart and through the arteries, and return to the digestive system, where they stimulate digestive juices and cause organ movement.

The hormones that control digestion are gastrin, secretin, and cholecystokinin (CCK):

  • Gastrin causes the stomach to produce an acid for dissolving and digesting some foods. It is also necessary for the normal growth of the lining of the stomach, small intestine, and colon.
  • Secretin causes the pancreas to send out a digestive juice that is rich in bicarbonate. It stimulates the stomach to produce pepsin, an enzyme that digests protein, and it also stimulates the liver to produce bile.
  • CCK causes the pancreas to grow and to produce the enzymes of pancreatic juice, and it causes the gallbladder to empty.

Additional hormones in the digestive system regulate appetite:

  • Ghrelin is produced in the stomach and upper intestine in the absence of food in the digestive system and stimulates appetite.
  • Peptide YY is produced in the GI tract in response to a meal in the system and inhibits appetite.

Both of these hormones work on the brain to help regulate the intake of food for energy.

Nerve Regulators

Two types of nerves help to control the action of the digestive system. Extrinsic (outside) nerves come to the digestive organs from the unconscious part of the brain or from the spinal cord. They release a chemical called acetylcholine and another called adrenaline. Acetylcholine causes the muscle of the digestive organs to squeeze with more force and increase the “push” of food and juice through the digestive tract. Acetylcholine also causes the stomach and pancreas to produce more digestive juice. Adrenaline relaxes the muscle of the stomach and intestine and decreases the flow of blood to these organs.

Even more important, though, are the intrinsic (inside) nerves, which make up a very dense network embedded in the walls of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. The intrinsic nerves are triggered to act when the walls of the hollow organs are stretched by food. They release many different substances that speed up or delay the movement of food and the production of juices by the digestive organs.

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

Sources:http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/yrdd/index.htm#fig

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Indigestion

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Causes:..…click & see
Excessive acid accumulation in the stomach
Acid indigestion is a type of indigestion involving an excess of hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Frequent occurrence of acid indigestion can lead to aggravation of the duodenum or to an aggravation of the lining of the stomach, both of which can lead to ulcers which can be life-threatening. It should be distinguished from heartburn, which typically involves aggravation of the esophagus.

Common contributors to acid indigestion are:
Eating foods with too much fat in them.
Eating foods with too much spice in them.
Excess consumption of Alcohol andCaffeine
Smoking
Overeating
Eating too late in the evening, or eating just before sleeping..
Overconsumption of alcohol

Symptoms of indigestion are as follows:…...click & see
Feeling of heavy stomach
Stomach pain
Puking
Vomiting
Diarrhoea
Acidity
Burning Sensation in the chest.
A pain or a burning feeling in the upper portion of the stomach
Feeling sick to one’s stomach; nausea
Feeling bloated
Sometimes uncontrollable burping
Heartburn
Feeling feverish
A bitter taste in the mouth from stomach acid coming up into the esophagus.
Rumbling in your stomach.
Sense of fullness after eating
A feeling as though something is lodged in the esophagus
Pain and discomfort at the xiphoid region
Sudden chills, comparable to those felt during fevers.

Modern Management.

Over the counter remedies (antacids) are available at almost all grocery stores and drugstores. However, a kind of dependence can develop on these medications, and other complications can arise from excess use of antacids.
Antacids neutralize excess stomach acid, and can provide temporary relief of indigestion.
Ayurvedic Treatment:
As per Ayurveda it not quite a disease by itself, this condition of ‘Agnimandya’ in Ayurvedic terminology, it denotes a condition wherein food taken does not get digested.

Root Causes in Ayurveda
Aggravation of the three doshas (diffects) – vata, pitta, kapha.
Excessive intake of improper food ,Psychic factors as anger, anxiety and worry,
Fast eating habits and Eating less of high-fiber foods.

Healing Options

Herbs :
1. Hing (Asafoetida) 2. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) 3. Lemon juice with rock salt

Ayurvedic Supplements: 1. Agni Bardhak Bati 2. Lavan Bhaskar Churna 3. Ajwain Ark

Diet : 1. Take a light fat -less diet 2.Have plenty of water and juices, especially
3.lemon juice laced with a pinch of salt. 4.Intake of raw garlic is very beneficial

Lifestyle : 1. Avoid sleeping just after having a full meal.
2.Try to gain mental peace. 3.Physical exercise is a must.

Yoga: Peacock (Mayurasan) and Shoulder Stand (Sarvangasan)

Natural Indigestion cure works well at times.

Cure of Indigestion through Homeopathic medicine.

Prayanayam

Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine is often very effective in harmonizing digestion without side-effects.

If symptoms persist, immediate referral to physician to rule out more serious abdominal conditions or diseases.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Help taken from: en.wikipedia.org and Allayurveda.com