Tag Archives: Georgia

Jin Qian Cao

Botanical Name: Lysimachia christiniae
Family: Primulaceae
Genus: Lysimachia
Species: L. vulgaris
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Common Name: Jin Qian Cao

Habitat: Jin Qian Cao is native to E. AsiaChina. It grows in grassy thickets along roadsides. Damp areas along streamsides, open forests and forest margins at elevations of 500 – 2300 metres.

Description:
Jin Qian Cao is a perennial herb growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It is in flower from May to July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile…CLICK & SEE  THE PICTURES

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. An easily grown plant, succeeding in a moist loamy soil[1]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Most species in this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow autumn in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.
Medicinal Uses:
The whole plant is antiphlogistic, cholagogue, depurative, diuretic, febrifuge and lithontripic. A decoction is used in the treatment of abscesses, burns, bites, kidney stones, gallbladder stones, inflammation etc.   It is also used to treat mushroom poisoning and drug poisoning
Click & see :(1..)…….( 2)..….(3.)
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lysimachia+christiniae
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jin_Qian_Cao

Indian physic

Botanical Name :Gillenia trifoliata
Family: Rosaceae
Genus:     Gillenia
Species: G. trifoliata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Rosales

Synonyms: Bowman’s Root. American Ipecacuanha. Gillenia. Indian Hippo. Spiraea trifoliata. Spiraea stipulata.

Common Name : Indian physic

Habitat :Indian physic  is native to eastern North America from Ontario to Georgia.

Description:
Indian physic is an erect herbaceous perennial plant.It grows to 100 cm (39 in) tall by 60 cm (24 in) wide, with 3-palmate leaves and pale pink flowers with narrow petals and reddish calyces above red coloured stems in spring and summer. Its irregular, brownish root gives rise to several stems 2 or 3 feet in height, and has depending from it many long, thin fibres. The leaves and leaflets are of various shapes, and the white, reddish-tinged flowers grow in a few loose, terminal panicles.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Medicinal Uses:

Part Used-: Root-bark.

Constituents: The roots have been found to contain gum, starch, gallotannic acid, fatty matter, wax, resin, lignin, albumen, salts and colouring matter.

Gillenin was obtained by W. B. Stanhope by exhausting coarsely powdered bark with alcohol, evaporating the resulting red tincture to the consistency of an extract, dissolving this in cold water, filtering, evaporating, and finally drying on glass.

Half a grain caused nausea and retching.

Two glucosides were found, Gillein, from the ethereal extract, and Gilleenin, from the aqueous infusion.

Medicinally it is used as Tonic, emetic, slightly diaphoretic, cathartic, and expectorant. The American Indians and early colonists knew the uses of the roots, the action of which resembles Ipecacuanha.

Recommended in dyspepsia, dropsy, rheumatism, chronic costiveness, and whenever an emetic is required. It is safe and reliable.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/i/indphy04.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gillenia_trifoliata

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Hardhack

Botanical Name : Spiraea tomentosa
Family: Rosaceae
Genus:     Spiraea
Species: S. tomentosa
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Rosales

Synonyms: Steeple Bush. White Cap. White Leaf. Silver Leaf.

Common Name: Steeplebush or hardhack

Habitat:Hardhack is native to Canada. New Brunswick, Nova Scotia to the mountains of Georgia westward. It  grows to up to four feet high, and prefers moist to wet soil and full sun.

Description:
Hardhack is a deciduous Shrub, it grows to up to four feet high, with leaves ovate, lanceolate, serrate, greenish-white and downy.. It blooms in summer.  The rose-coloured flowers are in panicles underneath.Individual Hardhack flowers are about 1/16 of an inch wide and are arranged in narrow, pyramid-shaped clusters that can be up to eight inches long.The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects. Butterflies and other nectar-feeding insects find the flowers highly attractive. The flowers are followed by small, dry, brown fruit. It has a dense white-woolly tomentum which covers its stem and the underside of its leaves. It is noted for its astringent properties, which cause it to be used medicinally.
click & see the pictures

Medicinal Uses:
Parts Used: Leaves, root, flowers.
Constituents: The root is said to contain gallic and tannic acid, and, when freshly dug, some volatile oils.

The flowers give feebly the medicinal action of salicylic acid (aspirin) and are used in decoction for their diuretic and tonic effect. An infusion of the flowers is used as an astringent. An infusion of the leaves can be used in the treatment of dysentery. An infusion of the flowers and the leaves has been used to counteract the sickness of pregnancy and also to facilitate childbirth. The roots are astringent and have been used in the treatment of diarrhoea. An infusion of the leaves is also used.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/h/hardha02.html
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Spiraea+tomentosa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiraea_tomentosa

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Rhododendron calendulaceum

Botanical Name :  Rhododendron calendulaceum
Family: Ericaceae
Genus: Rhododendron
Subgenus: Pentanthera
Section: Pentanthera
Species: R. calendulaceum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Common Name :Flame Azalea

Habitat :Flame Azalea is  native to the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States, ranging from southern New York to northern Georgia.

Description:
Flame Azalea is a deciduous shrub, 120-450 cm tall. The leaves are 3-7 cm long, slightly dull green above and villous below. The flowers are 4-5 cm long, usually bright orange, but can vary from pastel orange to dark reddish-orange.Flowering  period is April to July….

Click to see the pictures.…...(01)...…....(1)…….(2).     ..(3)

Medicinal Uses:
An infusion of peeled and boiled twigs has been used as a medicinal tea by Cherokee Indians

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_calendulaceum
http://www.alabamaplants.com/Others/Rhododendron_calendulaceum_page.html
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_FGH.htm

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Umbrella-leaf

Botanical Name: Diphylleia cymosa
Family: Berberidaceae
Genus: Diphylleia
Species: D. cymosa
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ranunculales

Common Name: Umbrella-leaf

Habitat :  Umbrella-leaf  is native of United States.(Eastern N. AmericaVirginia to Georgia.)It is Very rare in the wild, growing in rich woods in mountains, thriving by streams.

Description:
Umbrella-leaf  is a perennial plant,  growing to 0.7 m (2ft 4in) by 0.3 m (1ft).
It is hardy to zone 7. It  blooms in the late spring ( from May to July). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland).It requires moist soil.    It is endemic to the deciduous forests of the southeast United States.

Cultivation:
Prefers a moist humus-rich soil and semi-shade, growing well in a woodland garden. The leaves are very large and can be up to 60cm across.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. The seed is very slow to germinate, usually taking a year or more. Sow stored seed as soon as possible in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring.

Medicinal Uses:
Antiseptic;  Cancer;  DiaphoreticDiuretic.

A tea made from the roots is antiseptic, diaphoretic and diuretic. An infusion has been used in the treatment of smallpox.The root tea was used by the Cherokees to induce sweating. This is a very rare plant in the wild, so little research has been carried out into its medicinal virtues. However, it is believed that the root might contain podophyllin, an effective anti-cancer agent

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resourcs:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diphylleia_cymosa
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Diphylleia+cymosa