Tag Archives: Global warming

Myricaria elegans

Botanical Name : Myricaria elegans
Family :Tamaricaceae
Reign: Plantae
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Order :Caryophyllales
Super-order: Caryophyllanae

Synonyms: Myrtama elegans, Tamaricaria elegans

Habitat : Myricaria elegans is native to E. Asia – W. Himalayas, Tibet. It grows on stony slopes, especially in Ladakh, 2700 – 4000 metres.

Description:
Myricaria elegans is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3.5 m (11ft 6in), with reddish-brown older branches, bearing lateral leafy branches and racemes; leaves on branches of current year, elliptic to elliptic lanceolate10-15 mm long with narrowly membranous margin; racemes spike-like, usually lateral, rarely terminal, 10-15 cm long; bracts ovate, 3-5 mm long with broadly membranous margin; pedicel 2-3 mm long; sepals ovate-lanceolate to triangular-ovate, 2 mm long, margin membranous; petals white to pink, obovate to nearly rounded, 5-6 mm long, narrowed at base; capsule nearly 8-10 mm long.

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.
It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a fertile well-drained soil in full sun with shelter from cold drying winds. Tolerates chalk soils.
Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Cuttings of mature wood of the current seasons growth, November to January in a sandy propagating mix in an open frame.

Medicinal Uses:...Poultice……The leaves are used externally as a poultice on bruises.
Other Uses:...Fuel……The wood is used as a fuel.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myricaria
https://sites.google.com/site/efloraofindia/species/m—z/t/tamaricaceae/myricaria/myricaria-elegans
http://www.pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Myricaria+elegans

Carapichea ipecacuanha

Botanical Name : Carapichea ipecacuanha
Family: Rubiaceae
Subfamily: Rubioideae
Tribe: Psychotrieae
Genus: Carapichea
Species: C. ipecacuanha
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms:
*Callicocca ipecacuanha
*Cephaelis ipecacuanha
*Evea ipecacuanha
*Psychotria ipecacuanha
*Uragoga ipecacuanha

Common Name: Ipecac, Its common name, ipecacuanha

Habitat: Carapichea ipecacuanha is native to Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, and Brazil. is derived from the Tupi ipega’kwãi, or “road-side sick-making plant”.
Description:
Carapichea ipecacuanha is an evergreen Shrub growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in) at a medium rate. It has a slender stem which grows partly underground and is often procumbent at the base, the lower portion being knotted.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soils.

It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a minimum temperature in the range of 15 – 18 degree centigrade . Prefers a well-drained humus-rich soil and a shady position. Plants need ample moisture and humidity if they are to thrive.

Propagation:
Seed – Greenwood cuttings in a sandy compost. Root cuttings.

Medicinal Uses:
The roots of ipecac contain a number of medically active constituents including isoquinoline alkaloids, tannins and glycosides. They have a violently irritant action, stimulating the gastric and bronchial systems, lowering fevers and preventing cyst formation in amoebic dysentery. The roots are used internally in the treatment of coughs, bronchitis, whooping cough and amoebic dysentery. One of the surest of emetics, even moderate doses will induce vomiting until the contents of the stomach have been voided making it especially useful in the treatment of drug overdoses. It is used in a syrup to induce vomiting in children who have ingested toxins. Smaller doses are strongly expectorant and it is a common ingredient in patent cough medicines. The plant needs to be used with caution since excess causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea. The roots are harvested, usually when about 3 years old and the plants are in flower, and are dried for later use. The plants are replanted after partial removal of the roots. The plant is used in homeopathy in the treatment of nausea.
Known Hazards: The plant can be toxic in doses larger than recommended for medicinal use.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carapichea_ipecacuanha
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Carapichea+ipecacuanha

Taraxacum japonicum

Botanical Name : Taraxacum japonicum
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Cichorieae
Genus: Taraxacum
Species: T. japonicum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Habitat : Taraxacum japonicum is native to E. Asia – C. and S. Japan. Sunny ruderal habitats such as roadsides and edges of paddy fields at elevations below 500 metres.

Description:
Taraxacum japonicum is a  perennial plant ,  growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in). It is in flower from Mar to May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a well-drained humus-rich soil in full sun or light shade. Many species in this genus produce their seed apomictically. This is an asexual method of seed production where each seed is genetically identical to the parent plant. Occasionally seed is produced sexually, the resulting seedlings are somewhat different to the parent plants and if these plants are sufficiently distinct from the parents and then produce apomictic seedlings these seedlings are, in theory at least, a new species.
Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and either surface-sow or only just cover the seed. Make sure the compost does not dry out. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, choosing relatively deep pots to accommodate the tap root. Plant them out in early summer. Division in early spring as the plant comes into growth.
Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.

Leaves – raw or cooked. The roasted root is a coffee substitute. The following uses are also probably applicable to this species, though we have no records for them Root – cooked. Flowers – raw or cooked. The unopened flower buds can be used in fritters. The whole plant is dried and used as a tea. A pleasant tea is made from the flowers. The leaves and the roots can also be used to make tea.
Medicinal Uses: Cholagogue, diuretic, galactogogue, skin, stomachic, tonic.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum_japonicum
http://www.pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Taraxacum+japonicum

Prunus cocomilia

Botanical Name : Prunus cocomilia
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Species: P. cocomilia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms: P. pseudoarmeniaca Heldr. & Sartori

Common Name: Italian plum

Habitat : Prunus cocomilia is native to Albania, Croatia, Greece, southern Italy (including Sicily), Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and western Turkey. It grows on hedgerows in the mountains of N. Italy and the Balkans.

Description:
Prunus cocomilia is a deciduous Shrub growing to 5 m (16ft 5in).It is in flower in April. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

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Cultivation:
Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Succeeds in sun or partial shade though it fruits better in a sunny position. This species is closely related to P. cerasifera. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.

Fruit – raw or cooked. A bitter or sour flavour. The fruit is rarely produced in Britain. The fruit is about 2cm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses: Dye……..A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit.

Known Hazards: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cocomilia
http://www.pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+cocomilia

Erodium stephanianum

Botanical Name: Erodium stephanianum
Family: Geraniaceae
Genus: Erodium
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Geraniales

Habitat : Erodium stephanianum is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Mongolia, Siberia and the Himalayas..It grows on dry slopes, sandy river banks and as a weed of cultivation. Open placs at elevations of 2500 – 4000 metres in Nepal.

Description:
Erodium stephanianum is an annual plant. It is 45 cm or more tall, retrose-pubescent hairy. Leaves pinnatisect into 1-2 segment pairs; segments pinnatifid-partite into linear acute lobes. Stipules 5-7 mm long, lanceolate, pubescent, long ciliate. Bracts similar but smaller, scarious. Peduncles 2-3 flowered, 4-6.5 cm long. Sepals lanceolate, oblong, ± 5.5 mm long, up to 7 mm in fruit, ciliate, 3-nerved, hairy on the nerves, margin broad membranous, awn 2.5-3 mm long. Petals pink, slightly exceeding sepals, base ciliate. Filaments 4-4.5 mm long, base dilated, 2-toothed and ciliate. Beak 2.4-3.4 cm long, appressed pubescent. Mericarps 6 mm long, white setose, pits 2, not prominent.It blooms during June-July.

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Prefers a sunny well-drained position and a limy soil or at least one that is not acid.

Propagation:
Seed – sow in situ as soon as the seed is ripe in the late summer. The seed can also be sown in situ in late spring. It usually germinates readily

Medicinal Uses:
The aerial parts of the plant are antirheumatic, antiseptic and astringent. They are used in the treatment of acute and chronic rheumatalgia, diarrhoea, dysentery and enteritis. The plant has also shown antibacterial action against Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pneumococci, Shigella flexneri etc. A paste of the plant is applied externally in the treatment of gout.

Other Uses:….Dye….A green dye can be obtained from the whole plant. It does not require a mordant.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erodium
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200012381
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Erodium+stephanianum