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Stemless Carline Thistle (Carlina acaulis)

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Botanical Name :Carlina acaulis
Family : Compositae/Asteraceae
Genus : Carlina
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Cynareae
Species: C. acaulis
Common Names :Stemless carline thistle, Dwarf carline thistle, or Silver thistle

Habitat: Native to alpine regions of central and southern Europe. Poor soils in dry sandy pastures and on rocky slopes, especially on limestone.Cultivated Beds;

Description:
It is  Biennial/Perennial  dicotyledonous flowering plant in the family Asteraceae,  The common names are descriptive of the manner that its flower head rests directly upon a basal leaf rosette.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES.>……...(1)...(2).……..(3)..……(4).….
The spiny, pinnatilobate leaves grow in a basal rosette approximately 20 cm in diameter. The flowers are produced in a large (up to 10 cm) flowerhead of silvery-white ray florets around a central disc. The disc florets are tubular and yellow-brown in colour. To protect the pollen, the head closes in wet weather, a phenomenon folklore holds to presage forthcoming rain. The flowering time is between August and September.

It prefers chalky soils and dry pastures in environments from valleys up to an altitude of 2,800 m.

It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from July to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). The plant is self-fertile.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soi

Subspecies
There are two subspecies:

Carlina acaulis subsp. acaulis – inflorescences sessile
Carlina acaulis subsp. simplex – inflorescences with a short stem

Cultivation:
Succeeds in a sunny position in ordinary garden soil. Prefers a neutral to alkaline soil. Prefers a poor soil. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are hardy to about -20°c. The stemless carline thistle is a protected plant in the wild because of its rarity. This species resents root disturbance, it should be planted into its final position as soon as possible. Plants are usually short-lived or monocarpic. The plant is popular in dried flower arranging, the dried heads keeping their appearance indefinitely.

Propagation
Seed – surface sow in a cold frame in the spring. The seed usually germinates in 4 – 8 weeks at 15°c. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer.


Edible Uses

Edible Parts: Flowers; Root; Stem.

Flowering head – cooked. Used as a globe artichoke substitute, though they are considerably smaller and even more fiddly. The fleshy centre of the plant is edible. Does this refer to the peeled stem?. Root. No more details are given.


Medicinal Actions &  Uses

Carminative; Diaphoretic; Digestive; Diuretic; Emetic; Febrifuge; Purgative.

The rhizome contains a number of essential oils, in particular the antibacterial carlina oxide. The root was formerly employed in herbal medicine as a diuretic and cold remedy.

Stemless carline thistle is seldom used in modern herbalism. The plant was at one time in great demand as an aphrodisiac, it is occasionally used nowadays in the treatment of spasms of the digestive tract, gall bladder and liver disorders, dropsy, urine retention etc. The root has also been used in treating a range of skin complaints such as acne and eczema. A decoction of the root can be used externally to cleanse wounds or as an antiseptic gargle. Some caution should be employed since in large doses the root is purgative and emetic. The root is antibiotic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, mildly diuretic, emetic in large doses, febrifuge and purgative in large doses. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.

Other Uses

Weather forecasting.

The dried flowers respond to the amount of humidity in the air and can be used as hygrometers. Flowers on the growing plant close at the approach of rain.

It is sometimes cultivated as a rockery plant, or dried and hung as a house decoration.

In Basque culture it was traditionally used as symbol of good fortune, fixed into the frontal door of the house.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Carlina+acaulis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlina_acaulis
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Carlina_acaulis

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Herbs & Plants

Chrysothamnus Viscidiflorus

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Botanical Name :Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Chrysothamnus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Astereae
Synonyms: Bigelovia douglasii – A.Gray.
Common names : yellow rabbitbrush and green rabbitbrush.Green, Sticky-leaved, Douglas.
Habitat :  Western N. America – southern British Columbia to California. Dry open places in lowlands and up to moderate elevations.Woodland Garden; Sunny Edge;

Description:
Evergreen to deciduous shrub, from 1-4 ft [0.3-1.2 m] tall, rounded, much branching near the base, brittle.  Young twigs green, later ash-gray or grayish-yellow.  Leaves alternate, simple, linear, 1-5 cm long, 1 mm wide, grass-like, light green, smooth or slightly pubescent, sticky, lacks a petiole (sessile).  Flowers bloom in late summer, yellow, small, in rounded clusters, sticky.  Fruit 5-ribbed achenes which are plumed aiding dispersal by wind.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

It grows easily in alkaline and saline soils, and thrives on soils that are rich in calcium. It rapidly establishes in disturbed habitat, including burns, flooded washes, and rockslides, so it is a valuable shrub for revegetating damaged land such as overgrazed rangeland and abandoned mining areas. This shrub grows up to about 1.5 meters in height with spreading brittle pale-colored stem branches. The leaves are up to a few centimeters long and may be thin and thready or up to a centimeter wide and oblong in shape. They are glandular, resinous, and sticky. The inflorescence is a bushy cluster of flower heads, each head one half to one centimeter long. The flower head is lined with sticky yellow-green phyllaries and contains several yellowish protruding flowers. The fruit is a hairy achene a few millimeters long with a wispy pappus at the tip.

It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from July to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Cultivation:
Requires a sunny position and prefers a well-drained sandy soil. Plants do not require a rich soil. They tolerate alkaline soils. A very hardy plant but it prefers a drier climate than it finds in Britain though it succeeds in this country if given the protection of a dry sunny wall. A very variable and ornamental species[60]. The leaves and stems are pleasantly aromatic.

Propagation
Seed – we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in spring in a greenhouse and only just covering the seed. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in sand in a frame.

Edible Uses
Edible Uses: Condiment; Gum.

A latex obtained from the root is used as a chewing gum. The plant has been used as a spice.

Medicinal Actions &  Uses
Antirheumatic; Odontalgic; Poultice.
A poultice made from the chewed plant tips has been applied to boils and rheumatic joints. An infusion of the leaves has been used to treat colds . The finely mashed leaves have been inserted in tooth cavities to treat toothache.

Other Uses
Dye; Latex.

The latex obtained from the roots could be used in making rubber. Unfortunately it is not produced in sufficient quantity to make commercial extraction worthwhile. A green dye is obtained from the bark. A yellow-gold dye is obtained from the flowers. It is orange when alum is used as a mordant.

Scented Plants
Leaves: Crushed
The leaves and stems are pleasantly aromatic when crushed.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

 

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Chrysothamnus+viscidiflorus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysothamnus_viscidiflorus
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/chvis.htm

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Deltoid Balsamroot(Balsamorhiza deltoidea)

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Botanical Name : Balsamorhiza deltoidea
Family : Compositae / Asteraceae
Genus : Balsamorhiza
Common Namedeltoid balsamroot.
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Heliantheae
Species: B. deltoidea

Habitat : Western N. AmericaBritish Columbia to California.Open places but not on thin soils.


Description:

This is a taprooted perennial herb growing erect to a maximum height near 90 centimeters. The stems are hairy and glandular. The large leaves are up to 25 centimeters long and 20 wide, and are roughly triangular in shape, hairy and glandular, and often toothed along the edges. The inflorescence bears usually one or sometimes a few large flower heads, each lined with hairy, pointed phyllaries up to 4 centimeters long. The head has a center of yellowish disc florets and a fringe of pointed yellow ray florets each up to 4 or 5 centimeters long. The fruit is an achene 7 to 8 millimeters in length.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
Requires a deep fertile well-drained loam in full sun. Plants strongly resent winter wet. Hardy to at least -25°c. Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and should be planted into their permanent positions whilst still small.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 2 – 6 days at 18°c. Either sow the seed in individual pots or pot up the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in spring. Very difficult since the plant strongly resents root disturbance. It is probably best to take quite small divisions, or basal cuttings, without disturbing the main clump. Pot these up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in the greenhouse until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer if they have grown sufficiently, otherwise over-winter them in the greenhouse and plant out in late spring.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root; Seed.

Edible Uses: Coffee.

Root – raw or cooked. A sweet taste when cooked[161]. Young shoots – raw. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be ground into a powder and made into a bread. The ground seeds can be formed into cakes and eaten raw. The roasted root is a coffee substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
Miscellany.
A decoction of the split roots has been used in the treatment of coughs and colds.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Balsamorhiza+deltoidea
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=BADE2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balsamorhiza_deltoidea
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/potd/2007/04/balsamorhiza_deltoidea.php
http://www.pbase.com/rodg/image/78822814

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Mountain Dandelion (Agoseris glauca)

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Botanical Name :Agoseris glauca
Family : Compositae/Asteraceae
Subfamily: Cichorioideae
Genus: Agoseris

Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Cichorieae
Species: A. glauca

Synonyms : Agoseris villosa – Rydb.  Troxicum glaucum – Pursh.

Other common names: Mountain Dandelion ,false dandelion,pale agoseris and prairie agoseris.

 

Habitat : It is native to northern and western North America from Alaska to Ontario to New Mexico, where it grows in many habitat types.   Western N. AmericaBritish Columbia to Manitoba, south to California and New Mexico.  Meadows and other open places at all elevations in moderately dry to moist or even wet soils.

Description:
Agoseris glauca is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family .This is a perennial herb which varies in general appearance. It produces a basal patch of leaves of various shapes which may be as long as the plant is high. There is no stem but the plant flowers in a stemlike inflorescence which is sometimes erect, reaching heights near half a meter or taller. The flower head is one to three centimeters wide with layers of pointed phyllaries. The head is ligulate, bearing many yellow ray florets and no disc florets. The fruit is an achene with a body up to a centimeter long and a pappus which may be almost 2 centimeters in lengt

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

It is hardy to zone 0. It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen from June to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
The plant prefers light (sandy) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Varieties:-
Agoseris glauca var. dasycephala
Agoseris glauca var. glauca

Cultivation:
Prefers full sun and a sandy or gravelly loam low in nutrients. The sub-species A. glauca villosa is used for its gum.

Propagation:-
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 6 weeks at 15°c. As soon as the seedlings are large enough to handle, prick them out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer or late in the following spring. Division with care in spring. The plants do not like a lot of root disturbance so it is best to pot up the divisions and keep them in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are established.

Edible Uses:-
Edible Uses: Gum.

The solidified sap (latex) of the stem is chewed as a gum.

Medicinal  Actions &  Uses:-

Laxative; Poultice; Warts.

The following reports refer to the sub-species A. glauca dasycephala (Torr.&Gray.)Jepson. An infusion of the entire plant is used as a wash for sores and rashes. The milky latex is applied to warts in order to remove them. This requires constant applications over a period of weeks for it to be effective. A poultice made from the latex is applied to sores. An infusion of the root is used as a laxative.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Other Uses
Latex.

 

A latex in the plant contains rubber, but not in sufficient quantities to make it commercially valuable.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Agoseris+glauca

Click to access Agoseris_glauca.pdf


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agoseris_glauca

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Ageratina Herbacea

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Botanical Nane: Ageratina herbacea
Family : Compositae / Asteraceae
Genus: Ageratina

Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Eupatorieae
Species: A. herbacea

Synonyms : Eupatorium herbaceum – (A.Gray.)E.Greene. Eupatorium arizonicum Greene.

Common Names: Fragrant snakeroot and Apache snakeroot.
Habitat : It is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it grows in several habitat types.( South-western to South Central N. America.)   Pinyon-Juniper Woodland at elevations of 1500 – 2200 metres in California . Ageratina is found in forested areas. Woodland Garden; Sunny Edge; Dappled Shade;

Description:
This is a perennial herb growing a green, fuzzy stem from a woody caudex to heights between about 50 and 70 centimeters. The leaves are yellow to green or grayish and are triangular to heart-shaped. The inflorescence is a cluster of fuzzy flower heads under a centimeter long containing long, protruding white disc florets and no ray florets. The fruit is an achene a few millimeters long with a rough bristly pappus.
.CLICK & SEE THE  PICTURES
Ageratina herbacea has only white disc flowers, no ray flowers to create a “daisy” appearance. The flowers are mainly in groups at the end of stems. This appearance is similar to the Brickellias. However, the leaves of Ageratina are nearly triangular in shape and strongly toothed along the edge. In addition, the leaves are deeply veined. The veins are nearly parallel and mostly palmate from the leaf base except for some peripheral vein branching.

It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from August to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects. The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :-
Succeeds in an ordinary well-drained but moisture retentive garden soil in sun or part shade.

Propagation:-
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame, only just covering the seed. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring.

Medicinal Uses:-
A cold infusion of the plant is drunk and also used as a lotion in the treatment of headaches and fevers.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Ageratina+herbacea
http://www.wnmu.edu/academic/nspages2/gilaflora/ageratina_herbacea.html
http://tchester.org/gc/plants/species/ageratina_herbacea.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageratina_herbacea

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