Categories
Herbs & Plants (Spices)

Asarum caudatum

[amazon_link asins=’B06XVMJFBH,B01N7CWU4A’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’2cbb7cd4-4470-11e7-b043-c312c2f67e50′]

[amazon_link asins=’B00WFFU6JI,1604694203,1889540706,1509213724,B01G4SRDWE,1943190011,B004I43RPO,B019MYATQO,B0093B73V6′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’82d9634d-4470-11e7-bfb8-77865ec5a5f0′]

Botanical Name : Asarum caudatum
Family: Aristolochiaceae
Genus: Asarum
Species: A. caudatum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Piperales

Synonyms: Asarum hookeri Fielding & Gardner, Asarum rotundifolium Raf.

Common Names: British Columbia wild ginger, western wild ginger, or long-tailed wild ginger.

Habitat :Asarum caudatum is native to Western N. America – British Columbia to California. It grows on deep shade in moist pine woods and redwood forests. Understory of conifer forests, usually in mesic or wet places from sea level to 1200 metres and occasionally to 2200 metres.

Description:
Asarum caudatum is an evergreen Perennial growing to 0.1 m (0ft 4in) by 0.3 m (1ft) at a fast rate. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are distinct, hirsute (hairy), cup-shaped, and brown-purple to green-yellow which terminate in three, long, gracefully curved lobes, often concealed by leaves. The long rhizomes give rise to persistent reniform (kidney/heart shaped) leaves. Leaves are found in colonies or clusters as the rhizome spreads, forming mats. The leaves emit a ginger aroma when rubbed.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Flies.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a rich moist neutral to acid soil in woodland or a shady position in the rock garden. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c. The flowers are malodorous and are pollinated by flies. Plants often self-sow when growing in a suitable position. Special Features:Attractive foliage, North American native, Fragrant foliage, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the summer. Stored seed will require 3 weeks cold stratification and should be sown in late winter. The seed usually germinates in the spring in 1 – 4 or more weeks at 18°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in light shade in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out when large enough in late spring. Division in spring or autumn. Plants are slow to increase. It is best to pot the divisions up and keep them in light shade in the greenhouse until they are growing away strongly.
Edible Uses: Condiment; Tea.
The root can be used as a ginger substitute. The root has a pungent, aromatic smell like mild pepper and ginger mixed, but more strongly aromatic. It can be harvested all year round, but is best in the autumn. It can also be dried for later use. Leaves are a tea substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
The root is laxative, stomachic and tonic. A tea made from the root is used in the treatment of colds, colic, indigestion and stomach pains. The root is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use. The whole plant is analgesic, antirheumatic, appetizer and tonic. A decoction is used externally to treat headaches, intestinal pain and knee pains. A poultice made from the heated leaves is applied to boils, skin infections and toothaches, whilst a decoction of the leaves is used as a wash on sores.

Other Uses :
A useful ground-cover plant for deep shade, spreading by its roots.Landscape Uses:Ground cover, Woodland garden.

Known Hazards : Although no reports of toxicity have been found for this plant, at least 3 other members of this genus have reports that the leaves are toxic. Some caution is therefore advised in the use of this plant.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asarum_caudatum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Asarum+caudatum

Advertisements
Categories
Herbs & Plants (Spices)

Astragalus crassicarpus

[amazon_link asins=’B01MU4PJDU,B01K3IVBTW,B01K3HQMZG,B00HME61AA’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’bf809b73-4f1a-11e7-8683-53f76c56df2a’]

Botanical Name : Astragalus crassicarpus
Family:Fabaceae
Kind:Astragalus
Reign:Plantae
Subkingdom:Tracheobionta
Division:Magnoliophyta
Class:Magnoliopsida
Subclass:Rosidae
Order:Fabales

Synonyms : A. caryocarpus. Ker-Gawl. A. mexicanus. A. succulentus. Geoprumnon succulentum.

Common Names: Ground Plum, Groundplum milkvetch

Habitat :Astragalus crassicarpus is native Western N. AmericaEastern Rocky mountains and eastward to Nebraska.It grows on prairies and plains.
Description:
Astragalus crassicarpus is a perennial herb growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It’s leaves are compound in groups of 15 to 29. Leaflets are about 1/3 to ½ inch long, less than ¼ inch wide, generally elliptic with a pointed or blunt tip, hairy to varying degrees on both sides. Stems are hairy, sprawling along the ground and rising at the tip end (decumbent).

Racemes of 5 to 15 pea-shaped flowers. Flowers are about ¾ inch long with an erect broad egg-shaped upper petal, notched at the tip, and 2 small lower petals that are mostly horizontal. The tubular calyx holding the flower is purple tinged with several prong-like appendages at the tip end. Flower color ranges from pinkish purple to lavender to blue-violet. A plant has several to many clusters on stalks up to 4 inches long arising from the leaf axils.

The fruit is a smooth round pod ½ to 1 inch across that ripens to purple, and resembles a plum. Inside are 1/8-inch, somewhat kidney shaped black seeds.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, lepidoptera.It can fix Nitrogen.
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry soil.
Cultivation:
Requires a dry well-drained soil in a sunny position. Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and are best planted in their final positions whilst still small. The stems are sometimes prostrate. This species is somewhat polymorphic and is separated into a number of distinct species by some botanists. The form sometimes known as A. mexicanus has larger seedpods than the type, up to 35mm in diameter. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby. Many members of this genus can be difficult to grow, this may be due partly to a lack of their specific bacterial associations in the soil.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. A period of cold stratification may help stored seed to germinate. Stored seed, and perhaps also fresh seed, should be pre-soaked for 24 hours in hot water before sowing – but make sure that you do not cook the seed. Any seed that does not swell should be carefully pricked with a needle, taking care not to damage the embryo, and re-soaked for a further 24 hours. Germination can be slow and erratic but is usually within 4 – 9 weeks or more at 13°c if the seed is treated or sown fresh. As soon as it is large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Edible Uses:
The thick fleshy unripe seedpods, which resemble green plums, are eaten raw or cooked. They are highly esteemed. The pods are about 25mm in diameter.
Medicinal Uses:
A compound decoction or infusion of the root has been used to treat fits and convulsions and has been used on bleeding wounds. It has also been taken or used externally as a stimulant.

Known Hazards: Many members of this genus contain toxic glycosides. All species with edible seedpods can be distinguished by their fleshy round or oval seedpod that looks somewhat like a greengage. A number of species can also accumulate toxic levels of selenium when grown in soils that are relatively rich in that element.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astragalus_crassicarpus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Astragalus+crassicarpus
https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/ground-plum

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Pyrola chlorantha

[amazon_link asins=’B008EBYMU6,B00VI8XVRM’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6851b81d-41c8-11e7-9c98-9f04f81424b0′]

Botanical Name : Pyrola chlorantha
Family: Ericaceae
Subfamily: Monotropoideae
Genus: Pyrola
Species: P. chlorantha
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms : P. virens. Schreb.

Common Name : Green-Flowered Wintergreen

Habitat:Pyrola chlorantha is native to Western N. America – Labrador to British Columbia, south to Illinois, Nebraska and Arizona. It grows on moist coniferous woods, 2000 – 3000 metres in Texas.

Description:
Pyrola chlorantha is an evergreen Perennial plant, growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in).
It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Jun to July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile....CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils and can grow in very acid soils.
It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Flower:
A raceme of 3 to 10 hanging flowers on short slender stalks at the top of the stem. Flowers are about ½ inch across with 5 round pale green to greenish white petals, the edges often curled down, and a cluster of yellowish orange stamens under the upper petals. The style is light green, curved down and out below the lower petals like an elephant’s trunk.

Leaves:
Leaves are basal, 1-1½ inches long, mostly round, toothless or with shallow rounded teeth, the blade shorter than or equal to the leaf stalk. The upper surface is dull, dark green with prominent light veins.
Cultivation:
Prefers a moist sandy woodland soil in a cool position with partial shade. Requires a peaty or leafy acid soil that remains moist in the summer[200]. This is a very difficult plant to grow. It requires a mycorrhizal relationship in the soil and therefore needs to be grown initially in soil collected from around an established plant. It is also very difficult from seed as well as being intolerant of root disturbance which makes division difficult. This species is extremely rare and endangered in the wild.

Propagation:
Seed – the only information we have on this species is that it is difficult from seed and germinates infrequently[200]. We would suggest sowing the seed as soon as it is ripe if this is possible. Sow it into soil collected from around an established plant, only just covering the seed, and put the pot in a shady part of a cold frame. Pot up any young seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle, once again using soil from around an established plant. Plant out into their permanent positions when the plants are large enough. You should not need to use soil from around an established plant to do this since the soil in the pot will contain the necessary micorrhiza. Division with great care in the spring Pot up the divisions using some soil from around an established plant, grow on in a lightly shaded part of a greenhouse or frame and do not plant out until the plants are growing away vigorously.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is astringent. It has been used in the treatment of menorrhagia, diarrhoea and haemorrhages. It has also been used to treat bloody diarrhoea in children.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrola_chlorantha
https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/green-flowered-pyrola
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pyrola+chlorantha

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Corn marigold

[amazon_link asins=’B00PVWPKUC,B00BID0Y2W,B01KH3DTG6,B00Z7C1ACS,B01LYMIK5Q,B01N59W89V’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’032dfd8f-f4cc-11e6-87c7-cf25133a7bb2′]

Botanical Name : Glebionis segetum
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Glebionis
Species: G. segetum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms: Chrysanthemum segetum

Common Name : Corn marigold , Field marigold and Corn daisy.

Habitat ;Glebionis segetum is native only to the eastern Mediterranean region but now naturalized in western and northern Europe as well as China and parts of North America. It is a weed of lime-free arable land in Britain.
Description: Glebionis segetum is a herbaceous perennial/annual plant growing to 80 cm tall, with spirally arranged, deeply lobed leaves 5–20 cm long. It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are bright yellow, produced in capitulae (flowerheads) 3.5-5.5 cm in diameter, with a ring of ray florets and a centre of disc florets.

CLICK &  SEE  THE  PICTURES
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, beetles, lepidoptera, self.The plant is self-fertile.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil, though it prefers a well-drained fertile soil in full sun. Grows well in sandy soils. Dislikes lime. Cultivated as a vegetable in China and Japan. There are several named varieties selected for their ornamental value.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in situ. The seed usually germinates within 10 – 18 days at 15°c. Autumn sowings succeed in mild areas[

Edible Uses:
Young shoots – cooked. Strongly aromatic, they contain coumarin. As a beverage, chrysanthemum is very popular as a summertime tea in southern China. Caution is advised, see the notes on toxicity below.

Medicinal Uses:
Chrysanthemum (mum) is a plant. It gets its name from the Greek words for “gold” and “flower.” People use the flowers to make medicine.

Chrysanthemum is used to treat chest pain (angina), high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, fever, cold, headache, dizziness, and swelling.

In combination with other herbs, chrysanthemum is also used to treat prostate cancer.

CLICK & LEARN MORE : 
Known Hazards: One report suggests that the plant contains coumarin. If this is true it would be unwise to eat the leaves, especially if they are dried, since coumarin can prevent the blood from co-aggulating when there is a cut.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Chrysanthemum+segetum
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glebionis_segetum
http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-904-CHRYSANTHEMUM.aspx?activeIngredientId=904&activeIngredientName=CHRYSANTHEMUM

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Centaurea Scabiosa

[amazon_link asins=’B002I6V10W,B01ETYSKOU,B00ANZ45H6,B01EQ1W2FE,B00DL0I0FI,B01AD0DCEW’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’505aebc3-c5ce-11e7-8efb-b99fb23d4568′]

Botanical Name : Centaurea Scabiosa
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Cynareae
Genus: Centaurea
Species: C. scabios
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: AsteralesBotanical Name : Centaurea Scabiosa

Synonyms: Hardhead. Ironhead. Hard Irons. Churls Head. Logger Head. Horse Knops. Matte Felon. Mat Fellon. Bottleweed. Bullweed. Cowede. Boltsede.

Common Name:  Greater Knapweed

Habitat: Centaurea Scabiosa is native to Europe and bears purple flower heads.
It is found growing in dry grasslands, hedgerows and cliffs on lime-rich soil.Frequent in the borders of fields and in waste places, being not uncommon in England, where it is abundant on chalk soil, but rare in Scotland. It grows in pastures, field edges and roadsides, usually on chalk.

Description:
Centaurea Scabiosa is a perennial plant, the rootstock is thick and woody in old plants. The stem is 1 to 3 feet high, generally branched, very tough. The leaves, which are firm in texture, are very variable in the degree of division, but generally deeply cut into, the segments again deeply notched. The lower leaves are very large, often a foot or even more in length, making a striking looking rosette on the ground, from which the flowering stems arise. The whole plant is a dull green, sparingly hairy. It flowers in July and August. The flowers are terminal, somewhat similar to those of the Cornflower in general shape, though larger. All the florets are of the same colour, a rich purplish-crimson, the outer ray ones with the limb divided nearly to the base into narrow, strap-shaped segments. The flower-head is hard and solid, a mass of bracts lapping over each other like tiles, each having a central green portion and a black fringe-like edge. In some districts the plant is called from these almost round heads, ‘Hardhead,’ and the ordinary English name, Knapweed, is based on the same idea, Knap, being a form of Knop, or Knob.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil. Prefers a well-drained fertile soil and a sunny position. Tolerates dry, low fertility and alkaline soils. Does well in the summer meadow. An important nectar plant for bees and butterflies. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in autumn. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer or following spring. This should be done at least once every three years in order to maintain the vigour of the plant. Basal cuttings in spring. Harvest the shoots when they are about 10 – 15cm long with plenty of underground stem. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Parts Used  in medicine: ––Root, seeds.

Medicinal Uses:
Diaphoretic; Diuretic; Tonic; Vulnerary.

The roots and seeds are diaphoretic, diuretic, tonic and vulnerary. The plant once had a very high reputation as an ingredient of the Medieval ‘salve’, an ointment applied to heal wounds and treat skin infections.
The root and seeds are used. Its diuretic diaphoretic and tonic properties are recognized.

It is good for catarrh, taken in decoction, and is also made into ointment for outward application for wounds and bruises, sores, etc.

Culpepper tells us: ‘it is of special use for soreness of throat, swelling of the uvula and jaws, and very good to stay bleeding at the nose and mouth.’
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centaurea_scabiosa
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/k/knagre06.html
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Centaurea+scabiosa