Tag Archives: Inflammation

Viola yezoensis

Botanical Name: Viola yezoensis
Family: Violaceae
Genus: Viola
Species: Viola yezoensis
Kingdom:  Plantae
Phylum:  Magnoliophyta
Class: Angiospermae
Category: Fabids
Order: Malpighiales

Common Names: Arrowhead Herb, English Name : Chinese violet. Japanese: Hikage-sumire, Chinese Name: Zi Hua Di Ding
Habitat :Viola yezoensis is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea. It grows on grassy fields in lowland, C. and S. Japan. Broad-leaved forests, montane thickets, grasslands on mountain slopes.
Description:
Viola yezoensis is a perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in).

It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay)

soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist

Cultivation:
Prefers a cool moist well-drained humus-rich soil in partial or dappled shade and protection from scorching winds. Tolerates sandstone and limestone soils but becomes chlorotic if the pH is too high. Prefers a pH between 6 and 6.5. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c. All members of this genus have more or less edible leaves and flower buds, though those species with yellow flowers can cause diarrhoea if eaten in large quantities.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. Sow stored seed in early spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Division in the autumn or just after flowering. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions, though we have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.
Edible Uses: Young leaves and flower buds – raw or cooked. When added to soup they thicken it in much the same way as okra. A tea can be made from the leaves.
Medicinal Uses:
Antiinflammatory; Antipyretic.

The whole plant is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and depurative. It is used internally in the treatment of boils, carbuncles, snakebite, skin disorders, mumps etc. The plant is harvested when in flower and dried for later use.

The Chinese herb compound prescription Viola yedoensis Makino Anti-itching Compound (VYAC), which consists of Viola yedoensis Makino, herb, Sophora flavescens Aiton, root, and Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz, root and rhizome, has been traditionally used to treat various skin allergic inflammatory diseases in clinic.

Clears toxins, reduces inflammation and is antibacterial. Internally for boils, carbuncles, snakebite, skin disorders (especially erysipelas), mumps, and hot disorders with inflammation of the eyes, throat, or ears.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Viola_yezoensis
http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Viola+yezoensis
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874116303026
https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/VIOYZ

..http://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Viola-Yedoensis-Cid5348

Crinum latifolium

Botanical  Name :Crinum latifolium
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Amaryllidoideae
Genus: Crinum
Species: C. latifolium
Kingdom: Plantae
clade: Angiosperms
clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Common Names:Lily, Giant Spider,White Lily

Habitat :Native Myanmar .  Crinum latifolium grows in many places in the world. It grows naturally in Asia, from India and Sri Lanka through much of mainland Southeast Asia to south China (Guangxi, Guizhou, Yunnan). It is also reportedly naturalized in the West Indies and in the Chagos Archipelago.

Description:
Crinum latifolium is a rosette-like herb that arises from an underground bulb. It is smaller and spreads less than other varieties of Crinum. It has a tidy rosette and long, straplike leaves. Five or more flowers grow on a stalk about 2 feet above the foliage of the plant. The flowers open in the late afternoon or evening and wilt by dawn of the next day from June until August. It is a stout perennial herb of about 2 m in height. Leaves are long, linear and ligulate type. Flowers are white in color and arranged in umbel. It’s flowers are sweet-scented, night-blooming . It is sometimes called milk crinum and wine crinum because of its white and pink blossoms. It can be used in the landscape and for medicinal purposes.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURE………….>…..(01)……..(1)..…….(2).…..

Medicinal Uses:
Bulbs and leaves of crinum are useful in herbal medicines. It is highly useful in the treatment of serious health conditions like prostatitis, adenoma, benign prostate enlargement, uterine fibroids etc. It is used to enhance cell-mediated immunity and acts as an effective T-lymphocyte activator. It is also used in cases of hypoxia, inflammation, detoxification, tissue regeneration, and hormone balancing. Leaf juice is used for earache, rheumatic pain, and sprain. Bulbs are used to induce vomiting.

A leafy traditional Vietnamese herbal remedy, it was used in ancient times by the royalty to enhance longevity. It is currently used in Vietnam for a wide variety of health benefits in treatment for serious health conditions including prostate and ovarian disorders such as prostatitis, adenoma, benign prostate enlargement, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts and tumors. It is known to contain eleven different alkaloids and amino acids. Crinum latifolium also contains steroid saponins and antioxidants, supports cellular immunity, and has been researched as being an effective T-lymphocyte activator. It may also be used to assist the body in improving hypoxia, infection and chronic inflammation, detoxification, regeneration of tissues, hormone balancing and is particularly supportive to the prostate and ovaries.  The leaf juices of this plant are used in India to alleviate ear-ache, and the bulbs, after roasting, are laid on the skin to ease rheumatic pain.   Leaves of the herb smeared with castor oil and warmed is a useful remedy for repelling whitlows and other inflammations at the end of toes and fingers. You can also use bruised leaves of the herb mixed with castor oil for this purpose. The herb is also useful to treat inflamed joints and sprains. For earache and other ear complaints, use slightly warmed juice of the leaves mixed with a little salt. You can also use an oil prepared from the fresh juice for this purpose.  The bulbs are powerfully emetic and are used to produce vomiting in poisoning especially antiaries.

You may click to see:
*Crinum latifolium touted to treat prostate cancer in Vietnam:
*Crinum latifolium Gardening
*Healthy Living Solutions

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://search.myway.com/search/GGcached.jhtml?pg=GGmain&ord=1&action=click&searchfor=Crinum%2Blatifolium&curl=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FCrinum_latifolium&isDirResults=false&tpr=sbt&cid=Mk0GPaSZDQQJ&st=site&ct=GC
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_LMN.htm

http://www.gardenguides.com/74753-crinum-latifolium.html

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Baikal Skullcap

Botanical Name :Scutellaria baicalensis
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Scutellaria
Species: S. baicalensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Common Name :Baikal Skullcap, Baical, Huang Qin, Skullcap Root

 

Habitat :Native to Lake Baikal, Mongolia, Siberia, and parts of China & Korea

Description:Baikal Skullcap is a perennial flowering plant. It is an herbaceous ground cover, quite low growing despite the picture of the flower. The stems spread along the ground and then turn upwards at the tip so the base can spread 24″ but the height is only about a foot.

.click to see the pictures

Germination: Grow from seeds indoors starting in early spring and transplant outdoors in summer.

Plant: full sun to shade. Baikal skullcap is drought tolerant once established.

Flowers: August. Collect seeds in September.

Harvest: the roots of 3-4 year old plants in spring or autumn.

Zone: hardy to zone 5, survives temperatures as low as -23°C or -9°F

Soil: well-drained soil that does not dry out

Constituents:Flavone glycosides ,Baicalein ,Baicalin ,Wogonin ,flavones

 

Medicinal Actions & Uses:
Action:

*anti-allergic [helps with allergies]
*anti-bacterial [an agent that destroys bacteria; bactericide]
*anti-coagulant [an agent that prevents the formation of clots in a liquid, as in blood]
*anti-inflammatory [an agent to ease inflammation]
*anti-microbial [an agent that destroys microbes]
*antioxidant [contributing to the oxidation of free radicals which are believed to contribute to premature aging and dementia]
*bitter and cold [applied to bitter tasting drugs which act on the mucous membranes of the mouth and stomach to increase appetite and promote digestion]
*diuretic [an agent that increases the volume and flow of urine which cleanses the urinary system]
*sedative (mild) [a soothing agent that reduces nervousness, distress or irritation]
*vasodilator [an agent that widens the blood vessels, lowering blood pressure]

Medicinal Part used: Root

Baical Skullcap is commonly used for:

Allergic Conditions

*allergic and inflammatory diseases
*allergic rhinitis
*hay fever
*inhibits prostaglandin production and histamine release
Blood Conditions

inhibits collagen and arachidonic acid induced platelet aggregation

Cardiovascular Conditions

*atherosclerosis
*hypertension

.
Gastrointestinal Conditions

*bacillary dysentery
Immune system Conditions

*acute infections
*autoimmune diseases
*chronic infection
*retroviruses, e.g. herpes, HIV etc.

Inflammatory Conditions

*chronic inflammation

.
Liver Conditions

*cholecystitis
*hepatitis

.
Metabolic Conditions

cataract and diabetes complications
Pregnancy

*abnormal fetal movements
*toxemia in pregnancy

.
Respiratory Conditions

*acute bronchitis
*asthma
*colds

.
Other

*clears heat and damp heat
*leukemia
*scarlet fever
*tumors

.
Externally

*acne vulgaris
*eczema
*peridontal disease
*urticaria

Dosage:

Recommended dosage is as follows:

2-6g/day dried root
4-12mL/day 1:2 fluid extract

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.robsplants.com/plants/ScuteBaica
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutellaria_baicalensis
http://www.globalherbalsupplies.com/herb_information/baical_skullcap.htm

http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/potd/2007/12/scutellaria_baicalensis_1.php

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Bai Zhu

Botanical Name :Atractylodes macrocephala
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Cynareae
Genus: Atractylodes
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Parts Used : The rhizomes are collected in November when the lower leaves begin withering. They are stripped of the small roots and sun-dried or heat-dried.

Common Name : Bai Zhu

Habitats: E. Asia – China, Japan and Korea.   Pastures and waste ground. Grassland and forests at elevations of 600 – 2800 metres.

Descriptiopn :
Bai Zhu  is a  Perennial herbaceous plant, 40-60 cm. high. Stems cylindrical, much-branched in the upper part. Leaves alternate, toothed, the lower 3-lobed with long petiole, the upper entire, short-petioled. Inflorescence in terminal head; flowers small, lilac, all tubulous. Achene globose, with a coma of hairs.
It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required)
CLICK & SEE
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist

Cultivation :
Succeeds in any well-drained soil in sun or partial shade. This species is probably hardy in most of Britain, it tolerates temperatures down to at least -15°c. Widely cultivated in China for its use as a medicinal herb. This species is dioecious. Both male and female plants need to be grown if seed is required.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in the following spring or early summer.

Chemical composition: The rhizomes contain essential oil 1.5%, atractylol, atractylon; glucoside, inulin, vitamin A, potassium atractylate.

Medicinal Uses:
Antibacterial;  DiureticSedativeStomachic;  Tonic.

Bai Zhu is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine. The root contains an essential oil, glucoside and inulin. It is a bitter-sweet tonic herb that acts mainly upon the digestive system and strengthens the spleen. The root is antibacterial, diuretic, hypoglycaemic, sedative, stomachic and tonic. It is used in the treatment of poor appetite, dyspepsia, abdominal distension, chronic diarrhoea, oedema and spontaneous sweating. It is often used in conjunction with other herbs such as Codonopsis tangshen and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Combined with Baical skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) it is used to prevent miscarriage. The roots are harvested in the autumn and baked for use in tonics

It has traditionally been used as a tonic for the digestive system, building qi and strengthening the spleen.  The rhizome has a sweet, pungent taste, and is used to relieve fluid retention, excessive sweating, and digestive problems such as diarrhea and vomiting.  It is also used in the treatment of poor appetite, dyspepsia, abdominal distension, and edema. It is often used in conjunction with other herbs such as Codonopsis tangshen and Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Combined with Baical skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) it is used to prevent miscarriage.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Atractylodes+macrocephala
http://sulwhasoo-sulwhasoo.blogspot.com/2010/12/update-history-of-whoo-chung-line.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atractylodes

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Asmatica

 

Botanical Name : Tylophora asmatica
Family : Apocynaceae
Genus : Tylophora
Species: Asmatica
Common names :  Indian lobelia   asmatica,asmitica
Parts Used : Leaves
Habitat :Grows in tropical countries.Native to the Indian subcontinent, asmatica grows wild on the plains of India.

Description:
The Tylophora is a perennial vine, twining climber with lance-shaped leaves and greenish flowers that produce many flat seeds. The leaves are gathered when the plant is in flower.
The leaves and roots of tylophora have been included in the Bengal Pharmacopoeia since 1884. It is said to have laxative, expectorant, diaphoretic (sweating), and purgative (vomiting) properties. It has been used for the treatment of various respiratory problems besides asthma, including allergies, bronchitis and colds, as well as dysentery and oseteoarthritis pain.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

History:
Asmatica has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine to induce vomiting and expectoration as well as for treating dysentery and rheumatic conditions.

Extensive laboratory research and clinical study has taken place in India and established that asmatica is an effective remedy for asthma. In the 1970s, a number of clinical trials showed that a majority of asthmatics taking the herb for just six days, gained relief for an additional twelve weeks.

It should be noted that the spelling of this plant, asmatica, differs from the asthmatic plant (Euphorbia hirta syn.E. pilulifera) and should not be confused with it although it does have a history of similar usage.

Cultivation
Propagule  Various Pollination method .

Chemical Constituents: Alkaloids (including tylophorine) ,flavonoids ,sterols ,tannins

Medicinal properties: antiasthmatic

Medicinal Uses:
Tylophora asmatica has been traditionally used as an antiasthmatic. Asmatica (sometimes called Indian lobelia) is only to be administered with proper professional knowledge. Herbal remedies are only prepared from the leaves.

Considered a specific remedy for asthma, asmatica may relieve symptoms for up to 3 months.  It is also beneficial in cases of hay fever, and is prescribed for acute allergic problems such as eczema and nettle rash.  The plant holds potential as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome and other immune system disorders.  Asmatica may relieve rheumatoid arthritis and may also be of value in the treatment of cancer.  Extensive laboratory and clinical research in India has established that asmatica is an effective remedy for asthma.  In the 1970s, a number of clinical trials showed that a majority of asthmatic patients taking the herb for just 6 days gained relief from asthma for up to a further 12 weeks.  However, the leaves do produce side effects  The plant’s alternative name, Indian lobelia, alludes not only to its value in treating asthma but also to its irritating effect on the digestive tract.
It is also beneficial in cases of hay fever as well as such acute allergic problems as eczema and nettle rash.

The plant holds promise as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome and other immune system disorders. It may also relieve rheumatoid arthritis and be of value in the treatment of cancer.

Other Traditional uses :
Parts used  Traditional uses for  Fragrance  intensity. Dye parts  Dye color
Cautions:
*Take only under professional guidance.
*Like its lobelia relatives, the leaves of asmatica do produce side effects and can have an irritating effect on the digestive tract.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.crescentbloom.com/Plants/Specimen/TU/Tylophora%20asmatica.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

http://www.innvista.com/health/herbs/asmatica.htm