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Chaenomeles

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Botanical Name: Pyrus japonica
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Amygdaloideae
Tribe: Maleae
Subtribe: Malinae
Genus: Chaenomeles
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms: Chaenomeles laganaria, Cydonia lagenaria, Cydonia speciosa,  Cydonia japonica

Common Names : Chaenomeles

Habitat : Chaenomeles is a genus of three species of deciduous spiny shrubs, usually 1–3 m tall, They are native to eastern Asia in Japan, China and Korea. These plants are related to the quince (Cydonia oblonga) and the Chinese quince (Pseudocydonia sinensis), differing in the serrated leaves, and in the flowers having deciduous sepals and styles that are connate at the base.

Description:
Chaenomeles is a genus of three species of deciduous spiny shrubs, usually 1–3 m tall,The leaves are alternately arranged, simple, and have a serrated margin. The flowers are 3–4.5 cm diameter, with five petals, and are usually bright orange-red, but can be white or pink; flowering is in late winter or early spring. The fruit is a pome with five carpels; it ripens in late autumn.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES……...THE PLANT………….…FLOWER & FRUIT.………….………………

Edible Uses:
The fruits are very hard and astringent and very unpleasant to eat raw, though they do soften and become less astringent after frost (when they are said to be “bletted”). They are, however, suitable for making liqueurs, as well as marmalade and preserves, as they contain more pectin than apples and true quinces. The fruit also contains more vitamin C than lemons (up to 150 mg/100 g).

Medicinal Uses:
The fruit is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, astringent and digestive. A decoction is used internally in the treatment of nausea, joint pains, cholera and associated cramps.

Other Uses: Chaenomeles is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Brown-tail and the leaf-miner Bucculatrix pomifoliella.

The species have become popular ornamental shrubs in parts of Europe and North America, grown in gardens both for their bright flowers and as a spiny barrier. Some cultivars grow up to 2 m tall, but others are much smaller and creeping.

They are also suitable for cultivation as a bonsai.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/q/quinja05.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaenomeles
http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/c/chaenomeles-speciosa=japanese-quince.php

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Ipomoea nil

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Botanical Name : Ipomoea nil
Family: Convolvulaceae
Genus: Ipomoea
Species: I. nil
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Solanales

Synonyms: Pharbitis nil – (L.)Choisy.

Common Names :Picotee morning glory, Ivy morning glory, and Japanese morning glory.Aguinaldo azul claro.

Habitat :Blue Morning Glory is native to most of the tropical world, and has been introduced widely.Grows in thickets on mountain slopes, waysides, fields and hedges from sea level to 1600 metres in China.

Description:
Ipomoea nil  is an annual Vines and Climbers, growing to 5m at a fast rate. Stems twining, pubescent, 0.5-2 m; leaves ovate to almost round, 3-lobed, or almost entire, slim, 5-15 cm, lobes ovate, acuminate or pointed, base heart-shaped; peduncles with 1-5 flowers; pedicels short; sepals 1.5-2.5 cm, linear with wider base, pubescent; corolla blue, 3-4 cm, limb 4-5 cm wide; ovary 3-locular, capsule globose, 8-12 mm, seeds pubescent.

CLICK  &  SEE  THE  PICTURES

It is hardy to zone 9 and is frost tender. It is in flower from July to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Requires a fertile well-drained loam in a sunny position. The plant is not frost hardy, but can be grown outdoors as a tender annual in temperate zones. A very ornamental plant, there are several named varieties. Closely related to I. purpurea.

Propagation:
Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water, or scarify the seed, and sow in individual pots in a greenhouse in early spring. The seed usually germinates in 1 – 3 weeks at 22°c. Plants are extremely resentful of root disturbance, even when they are quite small, and should be potted up almost as soon as they germinate. Grow them on fast in the greenhouse and plant them out into their permanent positions after the last expected frosts. Consider giving them some protection such as a cloche until they are growing away actively.

Medicinal Uses:
Anthelmintic; Antifungal; Antispasmodic; Antitumor; Diuretic; Hallucinogenic; Laxative; Parasiticide.

The seed is anthelmintic, anticholinergic, antifungal, antispasmodic, antitumour, diuretic and laxative. It is used in the treatment of oedema, oliguria, ascariasis and constipation. The seed is also used as a contraceptive in Korea. The seed is used in the treatment of edema, oliguria, ascariasis and constipation.  The seed contains small quantities of the hallucinogen LSD. This has been used medicinally in the treatment of various mental disorders.   Therapeutic benefits are somewhat enhanced when used in combination with costus and ginger.  Simply add 1-2 grams of each to the above decoction. The pounded plant is used as a hair wash to rid the hair of lice.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipomoea_nil
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Ipomoea+nil
http://www.cybertruffle.org.uk/vinales/eng/ipomoea_nil.htm

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Artemisia princeps

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Botanical Name : Artemisia princeps
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. princeps
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Names :Japanese mugwort,yomogi in Japan,in China it is known as huang hua ai and in Korea, it is called ssuk or tarae ssuk

Habitat : Artemisia princeps is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea.Grows in  waste ground and thickets in lowland and low elevations, central and southern Japan.

Description;
Artemisia princeps is a perennial, very vigorous plant that grows to 1.2 meters. This species spreads rapidly by means of underground stolons and can become invasive. It bears small, buff colored flowers from July to November which are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by wind. The leaves are feather shaped, scalloped and light green, with white dense fuzz on the underside.

It is in flower from Jul to November, and the seeds ripen from Aug to November.

click to see the pictures.> …(01)   ..(1)..     ..(2)....    ….…….

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. This species spreads rapidly by means of underground stolons and can become invasive. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.

Edible uses:
Leaves and young seedlings can be eaten raw or cooked. They can also be used in salads and soups after removal of the bitterness. The young leaves can be lightly boiled before being pounded and added to glutinous rice dumplings known as mochi to which they give a pleasant colour, aroma and flavour. Mugwort mochi can be found in many North American health food stores.

Medicinal Uses:
Leaves are used to treat eczema, itchy skin and excessive womb bleeding in China.  The fuzz on the underside of the leaves is gathered and used in moxibustion in Japan. Its juice is effective at stopping bleeding, lowering fevers and purging the stomach of impurities. It can also be boiled and taken to relieve colds and coughs.  The technique of treatment for cold (diaphoretic treatment) was called Yay (oneself)-su (pan)-maw (steam)-kare (to cause to do). The decocted mugwort was boiled in a large pan. The patient sitting near the hearth holds the pan. Patient’s head needs to be covered with a hood-like cloth (a blanket would be good), covering his/her face and the pan. Then the steam/vapor causes the patient to perspire. Sometimes the patient drinks the decoction to accelerate the process. The process lasts for 5 to 8 minutes depending upon the steam flow and condition of the patient. The patient perspires profusely.  Ainu people used to treat venereal disease such as syphilis and gonorrhea with mugwort plants. Washing genitals with leaves and stems of mugwort or/and drinking the decoction were found to be effective for controlling such venereal diseases.   Some eye diseases were treated with leaves of mugwort plant. Broiled leaves of the plant used to be attached to the eyelid of the affected eyes.   Yomogi is highly recommended in all inflammatory conditions, especially asthma, hay fever and atopic dermatitis. In these cases, it should be used internally and put into the bath. It is safe to be used long term and should be used first to get the condition under control and then at any sign of a return of the condition.  A recently rediscovered use of Yomogi is in the prevention and treatment of malaria. Travelers venturing to countries with malaria are now again at risk, as the traditional treatments are no longer working as effectively. Recent research and history reveals Yomogi is an excellent preventative which modern travelers should think about adding to their travel bag before heading to countries troubled with malaria. It can be used to stimulate the body whenever infection is a problem.

Traditional uses:
A. princeps is one of the varieties of mugwort used as moxa in Moxibustion, a traditional medical practice of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Tibet, and Vietnam. An evaluation of the efficacy of the smoke and water extracts of the herb found that both preparations inhibited the growth of a specific line of breast cancer cells in vitro.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+princeps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_princeps
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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Xiang Ru

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Botanical Name : Elsholtzia splendens
Family: Lamiaceae/Labiatae
Subfamily: Nepetoideae
Tribes: Elsholtzieae
Genus: Elsholtzia
Species: Elsholtzia splendens
Order: Lamiales

Common Names : Xiang Ru,Elsholtzia angustifolia (Loesener) Kitagawa; E. cristata Willdenow var. angustifolia Loesener; E. haichowensis Sun ex C. H. Hu; E. loeseneri Handel-Mazzetti; E. lungtangensis Sun ex C. H. Hu; E. pseudocristata H. Léveillé & Vaniot var. angustifolia (Loesener) P.Y. Fu.

Korean Name: Kot-hyang-yoo
English Name: Shiny elsholtzia/Aromatic madder

Pharmaceutical name: Herba Elsholtziae seu Moslae
Taxonomic name: Elsholtzia splendens, Mosla chinensis

Habitat :Native to Korea & northern China. Grows in hills, grassy areas; 200-300 m. Guangdong, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Liaoning, Shandong, Zhejiang [Korea]

Description:
Elsholtzia splendens is a perennial/annual plant. Stems are erect 30-50cm long, much branched above base, tawny purple; branches erect-patent; internodes 2-12 cm, with 2 rows of pilose hairs. Petiole 0.5-1.5 cm, gradually shorter upward, adaxially pubescent; leaf blade ovate-triangular to oblong-lanceolate, 3-6 × 0.8-2.5 cm, sparsely fine pilose, densely impressed glandular abaxially, base cuneate, decurrent, margin remotely serrate, apex acuminate. Spikes dense, 3.5-4.5 cm, secund; rachis pubescent; bracts subcircular to broadly ovate, ca. 5 × 6-7 mm, caudate-cuspidate, glabrous, sparsely glandular, tinged purple, margin ciliolate, apex 1-1.5 mm. Pedicel less than 1 mm, subglabrous. Calyx 2-2.5 mm, white hispidulous, glandular; teeth triangular, subequal, margin ciliate, apex spinescent. Corolla rose-purple, 6-7 mm, slightly incurved, subfunnelform, throat less than 2 mm wide, upper lip emarginate; middle lobe of lower lip circular, margin entire; lateral lobes truncate or subcircular. Nutlets dark brown, oblong, ca. 1.5 mm, tuberculate. Fl. and fr. Sep-Nov.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Chemical components: Thymol (1,2), -phellandrene (2), -bisabolene (3), -trans-bergamotene (4), monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (5,6).

Medicinal Uses:
The leaves and flowers of this aromatic plant have long been used as herb and seasoning. Also, the plant has been used in domestic folk medicine, due
to its diaphoretic and diuretic effects, and in Korea as a remedy for headache and cough.

A decoction of this herb is a traditional Chinese remedy for halitosis.  For this purpose, it should be taken internally and used as a gargle and mouthwash. Its use is said to relieve the effects of excess alcohol. It is used in the treatment of common colds, edema and oliguria. The plant has a broad-spectrum antibacterial action.

Cautions and Contraindications:
•Contraindicated for exterior deficiencies with sweating. This herb is referred to as “summer ma huang” and has a similar diaphoretic function.
•Drink it cool to avoid vomiting (per some herbal sources…mostly that means Bensky.)

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200019656
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Elsholtzia_splendens
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ffj.1856/pdf
http://www.wpro.who.int/internet/files/pub/97/109.pdf
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Elsholtzia

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Rhododendron aureum

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Botanical Name : Rhododendron aureum
Family: Ericaceae
Subfamily: Ericoideae
Tribe: Rhodoreae
Genus: Rhododendron
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms : R. chrysanthum. Pall.

Common Mane :Rosebay, Yellow-flowered rhododendron,Snow rose.

Habitat :
Rhododendron aureum is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea. It grows on the thickets in high mountain areas, both alpine and sub-alpine. Grasslands or liverwort-mosses strata in the alpine region at elevations of 1000 – 2500 metres.

Description:
It is a small evergreen  compact or prostrate shrub.This is a small bush, with the stem from 1 to 1 1/2 feet high, spreading, very much branched, often almost hidden among moss, from which the tips only of its shoots are protruded. The leaves are alternate, of the texture of a laurel leaf, ovate, somewhat acute, tapering into the stalk, reticulated and very rough above, and paler and smoother underneath. The flowers are large, showy, nodding, and borne on clustered, terminal, loose peduncles, emerging from among large downy scales. Corolla campanulate, 5-cleft, with rounded segments, of which the three upper are rather the largest, and streaked with livid dots next the tube, the lower unspotted. Stamens 10, unequal, and deflexed; the anthers oblong, incumbent, and without appendages, opening by two terminal pores. Capsule ovate, rather angular, 5-celled, 5-valved, and septicidal; seeds numerous and minute (L.). It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation:
Succeeds in a most humus-rich lime-free soils except those of a dry arid nature or those that are heavy or claye. Prefers a peaty or well-drained sandy loam. Succeeds in sun or shade, the warmer the climate the more shade a plant requires. A pH between 4.5 and 5.5 is ideal. Succeeds in a woodland though, because of its surface-rooting habit[200], it does not compete well with surface-rooting trees. Plants need to be kept well weeded, they dislike other plants growing over or into their root system, in particular they grow badly with ground cover plants, herbaceous plants and heathers. Plants form a root ball and are very tolerant of being transplanted, even when quite large, so long as the root ball is kept intact. Closely related to R. caucasicum. This species is very rare and difficult to cultivate. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn and given artificial light. Alternatively sow the seed in a lightly shaded part of the warm greenhouse in late winter or in a cold greenhouse in April. Surface-sow the seed and do not allow the compost to become dry. Pot up the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a greenhouse for at least the first winter. Layering in late July. Takes 15 – 24 months. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, August in a frame. Difficult.

Medicinal Uses:
It has been much used in folk medicine in Siberia for the treatment of rheumatism, gout, and urinary tract infections.  It has been used in homeopathic medicine in the treatment of urinary calculi and inflammation of the prostate gland. Caution should be exercised when using the flowers because they are toxic. Hemostatic, they are used in the treatment of spreading pus and blood in the thoracic region, especially the lungs.  Much used in Siberia as a remedy for rheumatism. Also useful in gout and syphilis.  The flowers are used in Tibetan medicine, they are said to have a bitter taste and a neutral potency. Caution should be exercised when using the flowers because they are toxic. Hemostatic, they are used in the treatment of spreading pus and blood in the thoracic region, especially the lungs.

Known Hazards:  Although no specific mention of toxicity has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where many members have poisonous leaves. The pollen of many if not all species of rhododendrons is also probably toxic, being said to cause intoxication when eaten in large quantities.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.rosebay.org/chapterweb/specaur.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rhododendron_aureum_Georgi.jpg
http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/rhododendron.html
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_aureum
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm?Voucher2=Connect+to+Internet