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Ailmemts & Remedies

Leprosy

Other name :  Hansen’s disease

Description:
Leprosy is a chronic infection caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Initially, infections are without symptoms and typically remain this way for 5 to as long as 20 years. Symptoms that develop include granulomas of the nerves, respiratory tract, skin, and eyes. This may result in a lack of ability to feel pain and thus loss of parts of extremities due to repeated injuries. Weakness and poor eyesight may also be present.

Leprosy is spread between people. This is believed to occur through a cough or contact with fluid from the nose of an infected person. Leprosy occurs more commonly among those living in poverty and is believed to be transmitted by respiratory droplets. It is not very contagious. The two main types of disease are based on the number of bacteria present: paucibacillary and multibacillary. The two types are differentiated by the number of poorly pigmented, numb skin patches present, with paucibacillary having five or fewer and multibacillary having more than five. The diagnosis is confirmed by finding acid-fast bacilli in a biopsy of the skin or via detecting the DNA by polymerase chain reaction.

Leprosy is curable with treatment.  Treatment for paucibacillary leprosy is with the medications dapsone and rifampicin for 6 months.Treatment for multibacillary leprosy consists of rifampicin, dapsone, and clofazimine for 12 months.  These treatments are provided for free by the World Health Organization.  A number of other antibiotics may also be used.  Globally in 2012, the number of chronic cases of leprosy was 189,000 and the number of new cases was 230,000.  The number of chronic cases has decreased from some 5.2 million in the 1980s.  Most new cases occur in 16 countries, with India accounting for more than half.  In the past 20 years, 16 million people worldwide have been cured of leprosy.  About 200 cases are reported per year in the United States.

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Leprosy has affected humanity for thousands of years.  The disease takes its name from the Latin word lepra, which means “scaly”, while the term “Hansen’s disease” is named after the physician Gerhard Armauer Hansen.  Separating people by placing them in leper colonies still occurs in places such as India,  China,   and Africa.   However, most colonies have closed since leprosy is not very contagious.   Leprosy has been associated with social stigma for much of history, which is a barrier to self-reporting and early treatment.  The word “leper” is considered insulting with the term leprosy being preferred.   World Leprosy Day was started in 1954 to draw awareness to those affected by leprosy.

Forms of Leprosy:
Leprosy may also be divided into the following forms:

*Early and indeterminate leprosy
*Tuberculoid leprosy
*Borderline tuberculoid leprosy
*Borderline leprosy
*Borderline lepromatous leprosy
*Lepromatous leprosy
*Histoid leprosy
*Diffuse leprosy of Lucio and Latapí
This disease may also occur with only neural involvement, without skin lesions

Symptoms:
Leprosy is primarily a granulomatous disease of the peripheral nerves and mucosa of the upper respiratory tract; skin lesions (light or dark patches) are the primary external sign. It first affects the skin and the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, called the peripheral nerves. It may also strike the eyes and the thin tissue lining the inside of the nose.

The main symptom of leprosy is disfiguring skin sores, lumps, or bumps that do not go away after several weeks or months. The skin sores are pale-colored.

Nerve damage can lead to:
*Loss of feeling in the arms and legs
*Muscle weakness

It usually takes about 3 to 5 years for symptoms to appear after coming into contact with the leprosy-causing bacteria. Some people do not develop symptoms until 20 years later. The time between contact with the bacteria and the appearance of symptoms is called the incubation period. Leprosy’s long incubation period makes it very difficult for doctors to determine when and where a person with leprosy got infected.

If untreated, leprosy can progress and cause permanent damage to the skin, nerves, limbs, and eyes. Contrary to folklore, leprosy does not cause body parts to fall off, although they can become numb or diseased as a result of secondary infections; these occur as a result of the body’s defenses being compromised by the primary disease.  Secondary infections, in turn, can result in tissue loss.
How the infection produces the symptoms of the disease is not known.

Causes:
Leprosy is caused by a slow-growing type of bacteria called Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Leprosy is also known as Hansen’s disease, after the scientist who discovered M. leprae in 1873.
M. leprae and M. lepromatosis are the causative agents of leprosy. M. lepromatosis is a relatively newly identified mycobacterium isolated from a fatal case of diffuse lepromatous leprosy in 2008.

An intracellular, acid-fast bacterium, M. leprae is aerobic and rod-shaped, and is surrounded by the waxy cell membrane coating characteristic of the Mycobacterium genus.

Due to extensive loss of genes necessary for independent growth, M. leprae and M. lepromatosis are obligate intracellular pathogens, and unculturable in the laboratory, a factor that leads to difficulty in definitively identifying the organism under a strict interpretation of Koch’s postulates. The use of nonculture-based techniques such as molecular genetics has allowed for alternative establishment of causation.

While the causative organisms have to date been impossible to culture in vitro, it has been possible to grow them in animals such as mice and armadillos.

Naturally occurring infection also has been reported in nonhuman primates, including the African chimpanzee, sooty mangabey, and cynomolgus macaque, as well as in armadillos and red squirrels.

Risk factors:
At highest risk are those living in areas with polluted water and poor diet or people suffering from diseases that compromise immune function. There appears to be little interaction between HIV and the risk of leprosy. Genetic predisposition appears to play a role in susceptibility.

Transmission:
Transmission of leprosy occurs during close contact with those who are infected.  Transmission is believed to be by nasal droplets.

Leprosy is not known to be either sexually transmitted or highly infectious. People are no longer infectious after as little as two weeks of treatment.

Leprosy may also be transmitted to humans by armadillos  and may be present in three species of non-human primates.

Two exit routes of M. leprae from the human body often described are the skin and the nasal mucosa, although their relative importance is not  very clear. Lepromatous cases show large numbers of organisms deep in the dermis, but whether they reach the skin surface in sufficient numbers is doubtful.

The skin and the upper respiratory tract are most likely entry route. While older research dealt with the skin route, recent research has increasingly favored the respiratory route. Experimental transmission of leprosy through aerosols containing M. leprae in immune-suppressed mice was accomplished, suggesting a similar possibility in humans

Diagnosis:
Endemic areas:
Per the World Health Organization, diagnosis in an endemic area is based on one of these cardinal signs:

*Skin lesion consistent with leprosy and with definite sensory loss
*Positive skin smears
*Skin lesions can be single or multiple, usually hypopigmented, although occasionally reddish or copper-colored. The lesions may be macules (flat), papules (raised), or nodular. Sensory loss at the skin lesion is important because this feature can help differentiate from other causes of skin lesions such as tinea versicolor.

*Thickened nerves are associated with leprosy and can be accompanied by loss of sensation or muscle weakness. However, without the characteristic skin lesion and sensory loss, muscle weakness is not considered a reliable sign of leprosy.

*Positive skin smears: In some case, acid-fast leprosy bacilli are considered diagnostic; however, the diagnosis is clinical.

Treatment:
A number of leprostatic agents are available for treatment. For paucibacillary (PB or tuberculoid) cases, treatment with daily dapsone and monthly rifampicin for six months is recommended. While for multibacillary (MB or lepromatous) cases, treatment with daily dapsone and clofazimine along with monthly rifampicin for twelve months is recommended.

Multidrug therapy (MDT) remains highly effective, and people are no longer infectious after the first monthly dose.  It is safe and easy to use under field conditions due to its presentation in calendar blister packs.  Relapse rates remain low, and no resistance to the combined drugs is seen.

Prevention:
Early detection of the disease is important, since physical and neurological damage maybe irreversible even if cured. Medications can decrease the risk of those living with people with leprosy from acquiring the disease and likely those with whom people with leprosy come into contact outside the home. However, concerns are known of resistance, cost, and disclosure of a person’s infection status when doing follow-up of contacts. Therefore, the WHO recommends that people who live in the same household be examined for leprosy and only be treated if symptoms are present.

The Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccine offers a variable amount of protection against leprosy in addition to tuberculosis. It appears to be 26 to 41% effective (based on controlled trials) and about 60% effective based on observational studies with two doses possibly working better than one.  Development of a more effective vaccine is ongoing as of 2011

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leprosy
http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/guide/leprosy-symptoms-treatments-history#1

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Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Xanthoma

Other Names: Skin growths – fatty; Xanthelasma

Description:
A xanthoma, from Greek xanthos, “yellow”, is a deposition of yellowish cholesterol-rich material that can appear anywhere in the body in various disease states.It is a skin condition in which certain fats build up under the surface of the skin. They are cutaneous manifestations of lipidosis in which lipids accumulate in large foam cells within the skin. They are associated with hyperlipidemias, both primary and secondary types.

Tendon xanthomas are associated with type II hyperlipidemia, chronic biliary tract obstruction, and primary biliary cirrhosis. Palmar xanthomata and tuboeruptive xanthomata (over knees and elbows) occur in type III hyperlipidemia.

Types:
Xanthelasma:
A xanthelasma is a sharply demarcated yellowish collection of cholesterol underneath the skin, usually on or around the eyelids. Strictly, a xanthelasma is a distinct condition, only being called a xanthoma when becoming larger and nodular, assuming tumorous proportions. Still, it is often classified simply as a subtype of xanthoma.

Xanthoma tuberosum:
Xanthoma tuberosum (also known as tuberous xanthoma) is characterized by xanthomas located over the joints.

Xanthoma tendinosum:
Xanthoma tendinosum (also tendon xanthoma or tendinous xanthoma) is clinically characterized by papules and nodules found in the tendons of the hands, feet, and heel. Also associated with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH).

Eruptive xanthoma:
Eruptive xanthoma (ILDS E78.220) is clinically characterized by small, yellowish-orange to reddish-brown papules that appear all over the body. It tends to be associated with elevated triglycerides.

Xanthoma planum:
Xanthoma planum (ILDS D76.370), also known as plane xanthoma, is clinically characterized by macules and plaques spread diffusely over large areas of the body.

Palmar xanthoma:
Palmar xanthoma is clinically characterized by yellowish plaques that involve the palms and flexural surfaces of the fingers.  Plane xanthomas are characterised by yellowish to orange, flat macules or slightly elevated plaques, often with a central white area which may be localised or generalised. They often arise in the skin folds, especially the palmar creases. They occur in hyperlipoproteinaemia type III and type IIA, and in association with biliary cirrhosis. The presence of palmar xanthomata, like the presence of tendinous xanthomata, is indicative of hypercholesterolaemia.

Tuberoeruptive xanthoma:
Tuberoeruptive xanthoma (ILDS E78.210) is clinically characterized by red papules and nodules that appear inflamed and tend to coalesce.[2]:532 Tuberous xanthomata are considered similar, and within the same disease spectrum as eruptive xanthomata.

Symptoms:
A xanthoma looks like a yellow to orange bump (papule) with defined borders.

Xanthomas are common, especially among older adults and people with high blood lipids.

Xanthomas vary in size. Some are very small. Others are bigger than 3 inches in diameter. They appear anywhere on the body, but are most often seen on the elbows, joints, tendons, knees, hands, feet, or buttocks.

Causes:
Xanthomas may be a sign of a medical condition that involves an increase in blood lipids. Such conditions include:

*Certain cancers
*Diabetes
*Hyperlipidemia
*Inherited metabolic disorders such as familial hypercholesterolemia
*Primary biliary cirrhosis
*Pancreatitis
*Hypothyroidism

Xanthelasma palpebra, a common type of xanthoma that appears on the eyelids and may occur without any underlying medical condition, is not necessarily associated with elevated cholesterol or lipids.

Diagnosis:
Your health care provider will examine the skin. Usually, a diagnosis of xanthoma can be made by looking at your skin. A biopsy of the growth will show a fatty deposit.

You may have blood tests done to check lipid levels, liver function, and for diabetes.

Treatment:
If you have a disease that causes increased blood lipids, treating the condition may help reduce the development of xanthomas.

If the growth bothers you, your doctor may remove it. But xanthomas may come back after surgery.

Prognosis:
The growth is non-cancerous and painless, but may be a sign of another medical condition.

Prevention:
Control of blood lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol levels, may help reduce development of xanthomas.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001447.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthoma
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Categories
Herbs & Plants

Chaulmoogra

Botanical Name :Taraktogenos kurzii
Family: Achariaceae
Genus:     Hydnocarpus
Species: H. kurzii
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Malpighiales

Synonyms:Hydnocarpus kurzii

Common Names:  Chaulmugra. Chaulmogra.

Bengali/Vernacular Name: Chaulmugra, Chalmoogra; Dulmugri (Sylhet).

Tribal Name: Balgach (Chakma); Taun Paun (Mogh).

Habitat : Chaulmoogra is indigenous to the tropical climatic regions in Malaysia and it also has its origin in the Indian sub-continent.

Description :
A medium-sized evergreen tree, 12-15 m high. This tree bears brown, velvety, spherical fruits and asymmetrical seeds having a gray hue. Chaulmoogra seeds are angled, but have rounded ends. It may be mentioned here that chaulmoogra oil can be obtained from an associated species called Tarak-togenos kurzii.
Leaves thinly coriaceous, entire, 18-25 cm long, lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate. Flowers in axillary cymes; petals 8, in 2-rows, broadly ovate, ciliate. Fruit, size of an orange, towny-velvety.
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Medicinal Uses:
Part Used: The oil from the seeds
Chemical Constituents:
Seeds yield a fixed oil, called chaulmoogra oil, which contains glycerides of cyclopentenyl fatty acids like hydnocarpic acid (48%), chaulmoogric acid (27%), gorlic acid (23%), oleic acid (12%) and palmitic acid (6%). Bark contains a large amount of tannins (Ghani, 2003).

Employed internally and externally in the treatment of skin diseases, scrofula, rheumatism, eczema, also in leprosy, as a counterirritant for bruises, sprains, etc., and sometimes applied to open wounds and sores. Also used in veterinary practice. Dose of oil, 5 or 10 to 60 minims. Gynocardia Ointment, I.C.A.

The oil, and the crushed seed, have long been used in southeast Asia to treat various skin diseases like scabies, eczema, psoriasis, scrofula, ringworm, and intestinal worms.  And it has been shown that the active principles of the oil (hydnocarpic and chaulmoogric acids) are strongly antibacterial.  For this reason Caulmoogra is employed in Hindu medicine to treat leprosy.  The bark contains principles capable of reducing fevers.  Oil is given as an emulsion or by injection.  Seed used externally and internally. It is usually applied externally as a dressing for skin diseases: combined with walnut oil and pork lard for ringworm; with calomel and sesame oil for leprosy; and with sulfur and camphor for scabies.  In India the seeds are considered to be an alternative tonic.  The seeds may be taken powdered in the form of pills.  Was first mentioned in Chinese medical literature in 1347, and its use spread worldwide as a treatment for serious skin diseases.

Known Hazards:
People using chaulmoogra or its preparations ought to be aware of the side effects this herb may cause. For instance, one may experience stomach irritation following the administration of chaulmoogra oil in the form of an injection into the skin. In fact, taking subcutaneous injections may also result in accumulation of calcium. Here is a word of caution – women should not take this herb during pregnancy or while they are breast feeding. In addition, people enduring leprosy should never self inject chaulmoogra oil, but always take the help of a professional and expert practitioner.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraktogenos_kurzii
http://www.mpbd.info/plants/hydnocarpus-kurzii.php
http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_chaulmoogra.htm
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/chaulm51.html

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

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Herbs & Plants

Chalmogra(Tuvrak)

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Botanical Name: Hydnocarpus laurifolia/wightianus
Family: Achariaceae
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Achariaceae
Genus: Hydnocarpus
Species:H. wightianus

Synonym: Hydnocarpus laurifolia

Indian Name: Garudphal

Common name: Jangli almond

Bengali name: Choulmogara

Hindi:Calmogara, Chalmogra, Chaulmoogra, Jangli badam
Kannada: Chalmogra yenne mara, Mirolhakai, Surti, Suranti, Toratti, Garudaphala
Malayalam: Kodi, Maravatty, Marotti, Nirvatta, Nirvetti
Marathi: Kadu Kawath
Sanskrit: Tuvaraka, Turveraka, Tuvrak, Kushtavairi
Tamil: Maravetti, Maravattai, Marotti
Telugu: Niradi-vittulu

Habitat: This tree found in tropical forests and western ghats of South India.

Description and Composition
Chalmogra is a tall evergreen tree with whitish wood. It has sharply-toothed, smooth and shining leaves, spherical fruits, about the size of an apple, with a rough thick brown rind. Within the fruit there are 10 to 20 angular seeds, embedded in a scanty white pulp. The trade name chalmogra is based on the local name of the tree. It is leathery-leaved tree of western India bearing round fruits with brown densely-hairy rind enclosing oily pulp that yields hydnocarpus oil.

Chalmogra has been used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine for leprosy since many centuries. In ancient Buddhist literature the efficacy of raw chalmogra seeds in treating leprosy is mentioned. Records show that the oil extracted from its seeds has been used in the treatment of leprosy and other skin diseases since 1595. In the Makhzanel-Adwiya, one of the oldest books on Mohammedan materia medica, mention is made of the use of the seeds under the name of chalmogri

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You may click to see different pictures of  Chalmogra plant

By 1868, the curative effects of chalmogra were so well­ known that it was made official in the Pharmacopoeia of India. It was, however, not till 1904, when Fredrick B. Power and his collaborators published in detail the chemistry of chalmogra oil, that the attention of the scientific world was drawn to this valuable drug. Experiments have proven its bactricidal properties. The seeds of chalmogra yield a fatty oil. The oil contains hydnocarpic acid, oleic acid and palmitic acid.

Chemistry:

It contains hypnocarpic acid, chaulmoorgic acid and its homologues. It also contains oleic acid and palmitic acids.
The oil is unusual in not being made up of straight chain fatty acids but acids with a cyclic group at the end of the chain. Seeds are ovoid, irregular and angular, 1 to 1 1/4 inches long, 1 inch wide, skin smooth, grey, brittle; kernel oily and dark brown. A fatty oil is obtained by expression, known officially as Gynocardia oil in Britain, as Oleum Chaulmoograe in the U.S.A

Benefits and Healing Power of Chalmogra Herb:

A local stimulant, useful in correcting disordered processes of nutrition.
The bark of the tree contains tannins, which are beneficial in the treatment of fever. The oil extracted from the seeds is useful in leprosy and skin disorders.
The oil from the seeds has medicinal properties. It is a tonic, useful in correcting disordered processes of nutrition and in restoring the normal function of the system. It is also a local stimulant.

Fevers :– The bark of the tree contains tannins, which are beneficial in the treatment of fevers.
Leprosy :- The oil extracted from the seeds is useful in leprosy. It should be applied locally to the affected parts. Recently chalmogra has been recognized in the allopathic medicine as a valuable remedy for leprosy.

Skin Disorders :– Chalmogra oil is a specific medicine for treating skin diseases. It is locally used in rheumatism and phthisis or tuberculosis. It is an effective dressing for scaly eruptions and chronic skin diseases, even those of syphilitic origin. A liniment made of equal parts of the oil and lime water is applied to scald heads, leprous ulcerations, rheumatic pains and scruf, or a scaly condition, on the head.
A paste of the seeds is a domestic remedy for wounds and certain skin diseases like eczema, ringworm and scabies. The infusion is used as a disinfectant for vaginal infection in gonorrhea and foetid discharges, especially after childbirth.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.vitamins-minerals-supplements.org/herbs/chalmogra.htm
http://www.allayurveda.com/herbalcure_us2.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydnocarpus_wightiana

 

Tuvaraka – Hydnocarpus laurifolia – Qualities, Research

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Herbs & Plants

Bakuchi

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Botanical Name: Psoralea corylifolia
Family:
Fabaceae
Genus:
Psoralea
Species:
P.corylifolia
Kingdom:
Plantae
Order:
Fabales

syn. Cyamopsis psoralioides

Common name:
Babchi Seeds, Bavachi, Bavanchalu, Bavanchi Bavchi, Bhavanchi-vittulu, Bawachi, Bhavaj, Bobawachi, Bogi-vittulu, Hakuchi, Kantaka, Karpokarishi, Karu-bogi, Krishnaphala, Latakasturi, Somaraji, Sugandha kantak, Vabkuchi, Vakuchi,Babchi

Habitat: Bakuchi grows throughout the plains of central and east India. The black variety is commonly used  now a days.

Description:
Bakuchi is an evergreen small plant. It grows from 4 and 9 metres. They may live to one hundred years of age. The plant is variable in habit, usually upright to sprawling, and may intertwine with other species. The plant parasitises the roots of other tree species, with a haustorium adaptation on its own roots, but without major detriment to its hosts. An individual will form a non-obligate relationship with a number of other plants. Up to 300 species (including its own) can host the tree’s development – supplying macronutrients phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium, and shade – especially during early phases of development…Click & see

It may propagate itself through wood suckering during its early development, establishing small stands. The reddish or brown bark can be almost black and is smooth in young trees, becoming cracked with a red reveal. The heartwood is pale green to white as the common name indicates. The leaves are thin, opposite and ovate to lanceolate in shape. Glabrous surface is shiny and bright green, with a glaucous pale reverse. Fruit is produced after three years, viable seeds after five. These seeds are distributed by birds.
Cultivation :
The psoralea herb grows and thrives well in any average garden top soil. The plant however, prefers a well-drained soil and enough of sunlight. The psoralea plants are very sensitive in the sense that they cannot endure any disturbance of the root and hence it is advisable while the plants are still small they should be planted outdoors in their stable place. The psoralea enjoys a symbiotic or ‘give-and-take’ rapport with specific bacteria in the soil. These bacteria form lumps on the psoralea roots and attach the much need nitrogen for the plant from the atmosphere on the roots. The amount of nitrogen deposits in the nodules formed by the bacteria are so abundant that while the psoralea plants can utilize some of it, the remaining nitrogen can be used by plants growing in the vicinity.

Propagation:
The psoralea plant is propagated through seeds. The best season to grow the plant is from early to middle of spring. For effective propagation of this variety of climbing beans, soak the seeds in warm water for approximately 24 hours and then sow them early in a greenhouse. It is always better to sow the seeds in separate pots or containers as this will not require any relocation of the plant. Alternatively, the seeds may be sowed in one large pot and the seedlings removed as early as possible, as the psoralea plant cannot tolerate any root disturbance. Continue to grow them in the pots till they are suitable for planting in their permanent place in the outdoors. It may be remembered that it is virtually not possible to transplant this variety of the beans species without afflicting some damage to their roots. The psoralea plant requires a division during the spring. Utmost care should be adopted while undertaking the division process as the plant is averse to any kind of annoyance to its roots. Again, it must be mentioned here that it is almost unfeasible to do the division of the plant with 100 per cent success as there is bound to be some damage to the roots.

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Medicinal Uses:

Parts Used: Seeds
P. corylifolia contains a number of chemical compounds including flavonoids (neobavaisoflavone, isobavachalcone, bavachalcone, bavachinin, bavachin, corylin, corylifol, corylifolin and 6-prenylnaringenin), coumarins (psoralidin, psoralen, isopsoralen and angelicin) and meroterpenes (bakuchiol and 3-hydroxybakuchiol).

Very high concentrations genistein have been found in the leaves of Psoralea corylifolia.
The chief active principle of the seeds is an essential oil; and a fixed oil, a resin, and traces of a substance of alkaloidal nature.

P. corylifolia L., or Bu Gu Zhi in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an herb used to tonify the kidneys, particularly kidney yang and essence. It is used for helping the healing of bone fractures, for lower back and knee pain, impotence, bed wetting, hair loss, and vitiligo.

 

Remedies For:
Aromatic, anthelmintic, antibacterial, antifungal, diuretic, diaphoretic, laxative, stimulant, aphrodisiac

Action & Uses in Ayurveda & Siddha:
Mathura tikta rasam, katu-vipakam, seetha veeryam, kapha-haram, rasayanam, ruksham, hrithyam, in meham, kushtam, jwaram, krimi, rakta-pittam.

Action & Uses in Unani:
Skin conditions, particularly leucoderma, anti-souda, balghami, fevers, anthelmintic, sedative for internal ulcers.

Dosage:
Five grams powder twice daily before meals with some coriander and honey (to taste); as an external paste.

Properties and Uses: Very powerful herb for variety of problems, such as: skin discoloration, veiling, baldness, conditions involving bilious affections, leprosy, leucoderma, antifungal and antiprotozoal, antitumor, enuresis, impotence, and frequent urination, improves hair and nails condition; tones liver, spleen, and pancreas;
it helps to overcome impotency,
frequent or involuntary urine. Have been used in India, China and Tibet both externally and internally.

A Top Herb for Leprosy, Skin Conditions

This herb has been considered by Ayurveda doctors to be so effective in the treatment of leprosy that it was given the name of ‘Kushtanashini’ (leprosy destroyers).

The powder from the seed is used to treat leprosy and leucoderma internally. It is also applied in the form of paste or ointment externally.

The unsaponified oil has been used with success in case of leucoderma and psoriasis.

It was shown to improve the color of skin (including removing white spots), hair, and nails. For instance, t

An ointment made by combining one part of an alcoholic extract of the seeds with two parts of chaulmugra oil and two parts of lanoline has been found to be effective in treating leucoderma, white leprosy, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin diseases and febrile conditions. The oil can be used both internally or as a simple ointment externally. Gently rub the oil once or twice daily. The proportion of the active ingredients may be increased if needed.

The herb is also prescribed for
Seeds are also used to make a perfumed oil. They are also used for scorpion sting, and snake-bite.

Safety Precautions: May increase Pitta when taken alone; do not take with low body fluids; do not use with licorice root.

The essential oil varies enormously in its effects on different persons. With the majority (95 per cent) of people, it causes only redness of the leucodermal patches. But in a small number (5 per cent) there is extreme sensitiveness to the oil. It may even cause blistering of the skin. The strength of the oil should therefore be varied in such a way as not to allow its action to go beyond the state of redness of the leucodermic patches.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Source:Hollastic online.com and weight-care.com

http://www.allayurveda.com/bakuchi-herb.asp

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psoralea_corylifolia

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