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Herbs & Plants

Yucca

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Botanical Name :Yucca spp
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Genus: Yucca
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Common Names:Yucca Root , Adam’s Needle, Soap Tree, Mojave yucca,Narrowleaf Yucca, Soaptree Yucca, Beargrass, Fineleaf Yucca, Yucca, Soapweed Yucca.

Habitat :Yucca is  native to Mexico and the Southwestern US.

Description:
There are different species of Yucca everywhere in the Southwest. These plants are easy to identify.

•They have long and narrow leaves that are radiate from the base of the plant and they also have very sharp needle ends

•Right in the center of the Yucca plant there is usually a flower stalk (3-5ft. long) that has lily-like flowers and fruit pods

•The fruit pods are 2-3 inches in length and and 1-2 inches in width.Inside these fruits are seeds which are thin, black, and coarse.

•The roots have a woody thick bark covering the outer layer and the core of the root is spongy.

•Some Yucca species grow 10 to 13 ft. tall. They grow in dry and sandy deserts, mesas, and Plains.

 Click to see the pictures :

Cultivation:
Yuccas are widely grown as architectural plants providing a dramatic accent to landscape design. They tolerate a range of conditions, but are best grown in full sun in subtropical or mild temperate areas. In gardening centres and horticultural catalogues they are usually grouped with other architectural plants such as cordylines and phormiums.[10]

Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia) are protected by law in some states. A permit is needed for wild collection. As a landscape plant, they can be killed by excessive water during their summer dormant phase, so are avoided by landscape contractors.

Several species of yucca can be grown outdoors in mild temperate climates where they are protected from frost. These include:
*Y. filamentosa
*Y. flaccida
*Y. gloriosa
*Y. recurvifolia

Active Ingredients:
Steroidal saponin is a highly active compound found in yucca plants. Saponins are precursors to cortisone and provide relief for symptoms of arthritis and rheumatism pain (Dr. Larry Milam, H. MD; 1999). Rich in Vitamin A, B-complex, and Vitamin C, yucca is also a good source of copper, calcium, manganese, potassium, and fiber. (Medicinal uses of herbs,1999).

Medicinal Uses:
Yucca is a medicinal plant. It was used widely in Native folk medicine for it’s anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory effects which support Yucca’s promise in the treatment of both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The plant contains several physiologically active phytochemicals. It is a rich source of steroidal saponins, and is used commercially as a saponin source. The steroidal saponins in yucca are used as starter substances in the production of synthetic steroid drugs. These phytosterols work with the natural immune functions of the body, and assist the body in using and producing these its steroid related hormones.1 Clinical trials conducted on constituents isolated from Yucca schidigera bark found evidence that the anti-inflammatory properties of these saponins have anti-tumor properties that may be important in further cancer research

It is also good for blood purifying and cleaning of the kidneys and liver. (1st herbshop, 1999). Many herbalists and healers used the yucca plant by boiling the roots for about half an hour and drinking it as tea.

Other Uses:
Yuccas are widely grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many species also bear edible parts, including fruits, seeds, flowers, flowering stems, and more rarely roots. References to yucca root as food often stem from confusion with the similarly pronounced, but botanically unrelated, yuca, also called cassava (Manihot esculenta). Roots of soaptree yucca (Yucca elata) are high in saponins and are used as a shampoo in Native American rituals. Dried yucca leaves and trunk fibers have a low ignition temperature, making the plant desirable for use in starting fires via friction. In rural Appalachian areas, species such as Yucca filamentosa are referred to as “meat hangers”. The tough, fibrous leaves with their sharp-spined tips were used to puncture meat and knotted to form a loop with which to hang meat for salt curing or in smoke houses.

Native tribes use this plant for arts & crafts, food, dye to color fibers and yarn to make rugs also to make a black dye color for art in Indian basketry designs.They use the yucca in a game called the Shoe Game (Moccasin Game) by using the yucca sticks (leaves) to keep the score, whoever ends up with all of the sticks (102 yucca leaves) wins the game! Navajos also use the yucca leaves as a whipping belt which are used by the sacred clowns in various ceremonies like the Night Chant Ceremony. Some Navajos also use this to make yucca fruit rolls that are part of the Puberty Ceremony (a ceremony when a girl becomes a woman).

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

 

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucca
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail61.php
http://medplant.nmsu.edu/yucca.shtml

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Herbs & Plants

Clintonia borealis

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Botanical Name :Clintonia borealis
Family: Liliaceae
Genus: Clintonia
Species: C. borealis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Liliales

Common Names : Blue-bead lily or Clintonia, also Clinton’s Lily, Corn Lily, Cow Tongue, Yellow Beadlily, Yellow Bluebeadlily, Snakeberry, Dogberry, Straw Lily

Habitat : The plant is native to the boreal forest in eastern North America, but is also found in other coniferous or mixed forests and in cool temperate maple forests. It is not found in open spaces, and only grows in the shade.

Description:
Clintonia borealis is a small (5–10 in) perennial plants, usually found in homogeneous colonies. At full growth, a shoot has 2–4 clasping and curved, slightly succulent leaves with parallel venation. The flowers are arranged in small umbels at the extremity of a long stalk. They have 6 stamens and 3 identical sepals and petals (tepals). In rare cases more than one umbel is found on a shoot or shoots from a clone. The fruits are small dark blue, lurid berries. A white-berried form (f. albicarpa) also exists.

Click to see the pictures

Click to see the picture

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The plant reproduces via seed or vegetatively by rhizomes. Flowering in May and June and the bloom color is  Yellow , Green , Brown.  It takes over a dozen years for a clone to establish and produce its first flower, 2 years of which are dedicated solely to germination. The rhizome starts to mold after approximatively 15 years, but a colony often covers several hundred m². Few specimens establish new colonies.

Clintonia borealis is extremely slow to spread, but established clones can usually survive many later modifications, as long as sunlight remains limited. Whereas crossed pollination is more efficient in producing seeds, self-pollination will still produce seeds, allowing the plant to propagate.

Like other slow-growing forest plants, such as Trilliums, Blue-bead lily is extremely sensitive to grazing by White-tailed Deer.

Propagation: Usually propagated by dividing underground runners in fall or early spring, but may also be grown from seed planted immediately after ripening. Plant divisions 1 in. deep. Be careful when handling the rhizomes and roots, because they are brittle. Pulp-

Edible Uses:  The young leaves of the plant are edible while still only a few inches tall. The fruit however, is mildly toxic, and is quite unpleasant tasting.

Medicinal Uses:
The rhizome contains diosgenin, a saponin steroid with estrogenic effects.The plant contains diosgenin a chemical from which progesterone is manufactured. It is anti-inflammatory and Native Americans used it to treat injuries of various kinds from bruises to burns and infections. A root tea was used as a tonic and to aid in childbirth. The leaves are cardiac and disinfectant. A poultice has been applied to open wounds, burns, ulcers, scrofulous sores and infections.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clintonia_borealis
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CLBO3
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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Herbs & Plants Herbs & Plants (Spices)

Aletris Farinosa

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Botanical Name: Aletris Farinosa
Family: Nartheciaceae
Genus: Aletris
Species: A. farinosa
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Dioscoreales

Common Names : Blazing star, Star grass, Starwort, False unicorn root.
Other common names.—Star grass, Colic root, True Unicorn Root, Ague Root, blazing star, mealy starwort, starwort unicorn root, true unicorn root, unicornplant, unicorn’s-horn, colicroot, devil’s-bit, ague grass, ague root, aloeroot, crow corn, huskwort. Some of the common names are also used in connection with Helonias (Chamaelirium luteum (L.) A. Gray), which causes much confusion, although the two plants do not bear any close resemblance. It is best, therefore, to designate it as Aletris, under which name it is best known in the drug trade.
Part used.—The rootstock, which should be collected in autumn.

Habitat :Aletris occurs in dry, generally sandy soil, from Maine to Minnesota, Florida, and Tennessee. It grows wild in bottom land, moist soil; and full sun to part shade, such as the edge of wooded areas in Eastern United States.

Description::Aletris Farinosa is a slow growing perennial herb. Aletris first presents as a starburst of basal leaves, sending up spikes that boast small white flowers from April to July. This native herb is no longer common due to habitat destruction; and should not be harvested in the wild for medicinal use. Height: 1-3 feet, Flower size: 1/4 to 1/2 inch long, Flower color: white,Flowering time: May to August.
click to see the pictures…>...(01)…...….(1).…....(2).…..

Aletris is a small herb. The leaves are all radical and grass-like, from 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide, and from 2 to 4 inches long. They are smooth, entire, acute, and of a firm texture, and have from 6 to 10 parallel and quite prominent veins. The flowering stem is erect, from 2 to 3 feet high, and arises from the center of the cluster of root leaves. It has no stem leaves, but at intervals of about 2 inches, there are very small, linear scales, which may readily escape detection without a close examination. The stems are round and striate near the base, but angular above. The flowers are perfect, and in slender, terminal, simple racemes. They are on short pedicles, with small bracts at the base. The perianth is cylindrical, urn-shaped, white, with a yellowish tinge at the apex; wrinkled, rough and mealy outside, and 6-cleft at the summit. The stamens are 6, small and included. The ovary is ovate, and tapers to a slender style, which is trifid at the apex. The fruit is a dry, many-seeded, acute pod, opening by 3 valves.

How to Grow Aletris Farinosa
Aletris can be grown from root divisions and in my opinion is a good candidate for “plant rescues”. Serious attempts at cultivation are needed if this plant is to be sustainable for medicinal use. It is slow growing and little cultivation information is available.

It is reported to take two years in a greenhouse from seed, one grower said it died as soon as he transplanted it to the outdoors. Frankly that is the only person I found who reported anything about growing this plant. That does not mean it cannot be propagated.

Chemical Constituents: – Alkaloids, Diosgenin, Saponin

Medicinal Properties:

Antiinflammatory; Bitter; Diuretic; Narcotic; Tonic.

The greatest value of unicorn root is its tonic influence on the female generative organs, proving to be of great use in treating cases of habitual miscarriages. It also promotes the appetite and is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, rheumatism and jaundice.

The root is bitter, diuretic, narcotic and tonic. Only use the dried rootstock, in large doses the fresh root is somewhat narcotic, emetic and cathartic. A decoction of the root is a bitter tonic and has been used for expelling flatulence and for various uterine disorders. It is used in the treatment of colic, though small doses, especially of the fresh root, can cause hypogastric colic. The root is harvested in late summer after flowering and dried for later use.

The root contains diosgenin, which has both anti-inflammatory and oestrogenic properties.

A tea of the leaves has been used in the treatment of colic, stomach disorders, dysentery and bloody dysentery
Aletris is used for “Female Complaints”, tones the uterus, anodyne, calms stomach, may have narcotic properties. Avoid use in pregnancy and when breastfeeding. No known interactions or contraindications, but may have estrogenic properties and should be avoided when estrogen is contra-indicated.

Action, Medical Uses and Dosage.—Owing to the confusion which formerly resulted from the substitution of the root of aletris for helonias, erroneous statements have been made regarding the status of the drug in female complaints. The drug must be restudied to determine its true place in therapy. Enough is known, however, to place it among the simple bitter tonics and stomachics, and as such it is employed to promote the appetite and aid digestion, and in flatulence, colic, borborygmi, etc. This root and its preparations are almost entirely employed in dyspeptic conditions; while, in the abnormal conditions of the female reproductive organs, the chamaelirium is used. The dose of specific aletris is from 5 to 20 drops.

Other species.—Three other species of Aletris, namely, Aletris aurea Walt., A. lutea Small. and A. obovata Nash, bear much resemblance to A. farinosa and are for this reason no doubt frequently collected with the latter.

Click to see:-> Homeopathic Remedies

History and Folklore
Keeps evil at bay when sprinkled around home or worn as sachet.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/aletrisfari.html
http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/aletris.html

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/herbhunters/aletris.html

http://www.biol.vt.edu/digital_atlas/index.php?do=plant&plant=101

http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Aletris+farinosa

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Herbs & Plants

Bishalanguli(Gloriosa superba )

 

Botanical Name: Gloriosa superba
Family: Colchicaceae
Genus: Gloriosa
Species: G. superba
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Liliales
Syn : Methonica superba Lamk., Gloriosa simplex Don.
Common names: flame lily, climbing lily, creeping lily, glory lily, gloriosa lily, tiger claw, and fire lily.

Names in other languages: kalihari (Hindi), Kaanthal (Tamil), lis de Malabar (French), aranha de emposse (Portuguese), bandera española [Spanish flag] (Spanish), mkalamu (Swahili), klänglilja (Swedish), riri (M?ori), and jia lan (Chinese).

English names: Malabar glory lily, Glory lily.

Sanskrit names:
Agninukhi, Agnisikha, Ailni, Garbhaghatini, Kalikari, Lanyli, Vishalya.

Vernacular names: Asm : Utatchandal; Ben: Bishalanguli, Ulatchandal; Guj : Dudhiovachnay, Varhvareli; Hin : Kalihari, Kaliari, Kulhari, Languli; Kan : Agnisikha, Akkatangaballi, Karadikanninagadde, Kolikuttuma, Sivasaktiballi, Mal: Kantal, Medoni, Mattamara, Mettonsi, Mentonni; Mar: Bachnag, Indai, Kariannag, Khadyanag, Nagharia, Nag karia; Mun : Bulung chukuru; Orn : Jhagrahi; Ori : Agnisikha, Garbhhoghhatono panjanyulia, Meherlaphulo, Panchaangula; Pun: Kariari, Mulim; Sad: Jhagar; San: Siricsamano; Tam: Akkinichilam, Kalappaikkilanku, Kalaippaikkishangu, Kannuvalikkodi, Nabhikkodi, Tel: Adabhinabhi, Agnisikha, Gangeri, Kalappagadda.

Habitat:
Bishalanguli  is native to much of Africa and Asia, but it is known worldwide as an ornamental plant, a medicine, a poison, and a noxious weed.Common in forests. Under cultivation in fairly large areas of India.Throughout tropical India ascending up to 2000 m on the hills; Indo-China, Malaysia.

Useful Parts: Tubers, leaves, and flowers.

Description:

Herbaceous, tall, stout climbing herb. Root-stock of arched, solid, fleshy-white cylindric tubers. Leaves sessile. Ovate lanceolate, tip ending in a tendril-like spiral. Flowers large solitary, axillary, changing colors from greenish yellow, orange, scarlet and crimson from blooming to fading. Fruits cupsule. Flowering time July in October to Indian conditions.Fruiting: throughout the year.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Height: Climbing 1.5 m or more. Leaves:Long-lanceolate to narrowly ovate-lanceolate.Leaf length: 10.2-12.7 cm . width:1.3-2.5 cm. Flowers: linear to narrow lanceolate. Flower length: 5.1-7.6 cm. Flower color:Yellow changing to red

Cultivation:
Kalihari is under cultivation in many states of India particularly in South India.

Propagation: From its ‘V’ shaped tubers.
Maturity: 170–180 days after sowing.

Yield:
200 kg seed and 150 kg pericarp.

Related Species: Six tuberous-rooted species in tropical Africa and Asia have been reported. Difference between two major varieties G. superba and G. rothschildiana

Chemical Constituents: Seed contain high level of colchicines. Cornigerine, 3-demethyl-N-formyl-N-deacetyl-b-lumicolchicine, 3-demethyl-g-lumicolchicine, 3-demethyl colchicines have been isolated from plant. b-sitosterol, its glucoside, a long chain fatty acid, b and g-lumiccolchicines from fresh tubers and luteolin, colchicines, N-formyldeacetylcolchicines and glucosides of 3-demethylcolchicine have been isolated from flowers.

Root: colchicine, b-sitosterol and its glucoside, band t-Iumicolchicine, 2-0H-6-MeO benzoic acid; Young leaf: cholidonic acid; Flower: luterlin and its glucosides, N-formyl-de-Ac-colchicine, lumicolchicine; Seed: colchicine.

Medicinal Properties and Uses:
In Ayurveda and Yunani systems of medicine it is a reputed medicine. According to Ayurveda, tuber is pungent, bitter, acrid, heating, anthemirtic, laxative, alexiteric, abortifacient, and useful in ulcers, leprosy, piles, iflommations, abdominal pains, itching and thirst.

Traditional use: ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF NORTH-EAST INDIA: Root: in gout, stomachache and as tonic; MUNDA AND ORAON: Tuber: for antifertility purpose; SANTAL : (i) Tuberous root: for abortion purpose, in intermittent fevers, wounds; (ii) Plant: in spleen complaints, syphilis, tumours; (ii) Leaf: in asthma; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF BIHAR: Root: in cholera, to facilitate childbirth; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF ORISSA: Tuber : as abortifacient; TRIBES OF VARANASI : Root: in gout; TRIBES OF PITHORAGARH: Tuber: in gonorrhoea, leprosy, piles; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF DEHRA DUN AND SIWALIK: Root: as anthelmintic; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF GARHWAL : Tuberous root: for abortion;

CHARAKA SAMHITA : useful in itching, skin diseases including wounds and ailments caused by vitiated kapha (phlegm) and vata (wind); SUSHRUTA SAMHITA: can be administered to a delivered mother along with spirituous drink to give relieve to her postnatal complaints, roots are poisonous; RAJANIGHANTU: it is pungent, thermogenic, eliminates deranged kapha (phlegm) and vata (wind), terminates pregnancy; DHANVANTARI NIGHANTU: in addition to the above, it is also useful in dropsy, labour pain, wounds, and as a purgative; MADANADI NIGHANTU : it is bitter, pungent, thermogenic, abortifacient, removes abdominal pain, expels the placenta, cures phlegm, skin diseases; BHAVAPRAKASHA : it is apperient, alkaline, astringent, pungent, bitter, highly potent, light, abortifacient, helps storing up energy, excites pitta (bile), it cures dropsy, piles, wounds, acute spasmodic pain, and removes worms; CHAKRADATTA : Root-paste: if smeared over’ the palms and feet of a pregnant woman, delivery of child becomes easier.

AYURVEDA : (i) roots are abortifacient, acrid, alexiteric, anthelmintic, antipyretic, bitter, depurative, digestive, emetic, expectorant, gastrointestinal irritant, highly poisonous, purgative, rejuvenating, stomachic, thermogenic, tonic, beneficial in vitiated conditions of kapha (phlegm) and vata (wind), debility, dyspepsia, flatulence, haemorrhoids, helminthiasis, inflammations, in promoting labour pain and expulsion of the placenta; (ii) root-paste is effective against paralysis, rheumatism, snake bite, insect bites; (iii) leaf-juice effective against lice.

Modern use: Root (aq. extract) : ecbolic in humans and other animals; Plant (50% EtOH extract) : spasmolytic, Central Nervous System depressant; Leaf-juice: piscicide. Phytography : Herbaceous tendril climber; rootstock tuberous, naked; stem 3-6 m long, sparingly branched; leaves sessile or nearly so, opposite or 3-nately whorled, tip tendrillar; flowers axillary, solitary, nearly 10 cm, at first greenish, becoming yellow and finally scarlet or red; capsules nearly 5 cm long.

Remarks: It is getting less attention in India, though extensive researches are on abroad.

Known Hazards: This plant is poisonous, toxic enough to cause human and animal fatalities if ingested. It has been used to commit murder, to achieve suicide, and to kill animals.  Every part of the plant is poisonous, especially the tuberous rhizomes. As with other members of the Colchicaceae, this plant contains high levels of colchicine, a toxic alkaloid. It also contains the alkaloid gloriocine. Within a few hours of the ingestion of a toxic amount of plant material, a victim may experience nausea, vomiting, numbness, and tingling around the mouth, burning in the throat, abdominal pain, and bloody diarrhea, which leads to dehydration.  As the toxic syndrome progresses, rhabdomyolysis, ileus, respiratory depression, hypotension, coagulopathy, haematuria, altered mental status, seizures, coma, and ascending polyneuropathy may occur. Longer-term effects include peeling of the skin and prolonged vaginal bleeding in women.  Colchicine is known to cause alopecia. One case report described a patient who accidentally ate the tubers and then experienced hair loss over her entire body, including complete baldness. Poisonings can occur when the tubers are mistaken for sweet potatoes or yams and eaten. The plant can be dangerous for cats, dogs, horses, and livestock, as well.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources;
http://www.bsienvis.org/medi.htm#Euphorbia%20tirucalli
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/CropFactSheets/gloriosa.html
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GLSU2&photoID=glsu2_002_ahp.tif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloriosa_superba

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Herbs & Plants

Safed Musli

Botanical Name: Chlorophytum Borivilianum

Family : Liliaceae,

English Name: Indian Spider Plant
Common Name: Safed Musli
Parts used: Tuberous Root and Seeds

Habitat:Chlorophytum is a genus of about 200-220 species of evergreen perennial flowering plants in the Agavaceae, native to the tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Asia.
Chlorophytum comosum, the Spider Plant, a native of South Africa, is a very popular houseplant in its variegated form.

Description:
Safed Musli belongs to the family of Liliaceae, is a traditional medicinal plant found is natural forest right from east Assam to Gujarat. It is a pretty herb with erect lanceolate herbed leaves erect dense flowered racemoses of white colour.They grow to 10-60 cm tall, with a rosette of long, slender leaves 15-75 cm long and 0.5-2 cm broad, growing from a thick, fleshy rhizome. The flowers are small, usually white, produced on sparse panicles up to 120 cm long; in some species the panicle also bears plantlets, which take root on touching the ground.

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Different Species of Musli (Moosli):

In India about eight species of safed musli are reported out of them only Chlorophytum borivillianum, Chlorophytum arundinaceam and Chlorophytum tuberosum are commercially collected by our tribes from the forest. Chlorophytum borivillianum is the only species which is under commercial cultivation.

1.Chlorophytum borivillianum
2.Chlorophytum arundinaceum
3.Chlorophytum tuberocum
4.Chlorophytum malabericum
5.Chlorophytum attenuatum
6.Chlorophytum breviscapum
7.Asparagus filicinus
8.A. gonoclados
Medicinal Uses:
.Aphrodasiac, tonic, pain reliever and used to cure general debility and impotency. Its powder increases lactation in feeding mothers and lactating cows. It is being increasingly used in Ayurvedic and Pharmaceutical Industries.
Safed Musli is a rare divine-graced herb to offer all the effects required for achievement of health par excellence or for attaining the ultimate positive health. It treats male sexual inadequacies like oligospermia, lack of libido, impotency, etc, general debility. It is also used as major components in all kinds of sex-tonics and capsules.

Safed Musli is also gaining increasing acceptance as a vitalizer and health-giving tonic, a curative for pre-natal and post-natal problems, a restorative for immunity-improvement and as a remedy for diabetes and arthritis.

Chlorophytum borivilianum is eaten as a leaf vegetable in some parts of India, and its roots are used medicinally as a sex tonic under the name safed moosli. The medicinal value is thought to derive from its saponin content, up to 17 percent by dry weight. It has also recently been suggested that it may produce an aphrodisiac agent. It is a herb with lanceolate leaves, from tropical wet forests. As medicinal demand has increased, the plant has been brought under cultivation. The saponins and alkaloids present in the plant are the source of its alleged aphrodisiac properties.

Its tubers are used in Ayurvedic medicines; it contains about 27 alkaloids, steroid saponin (2-17%), polysaccaroids (40-45%), carbohydrates, proteins (7-10%), minerals, vitamins etc. White musli or Dhauli Musli is used for the preparation of health tonic used in general and sexual weekness. It contains spermametogic properties, decoction of safed musli for curing impotency as they are rich in glycosides.

Composition and Uses:
Safed Musli is a rich source of :
* Alkaloids
* Proteins
* Carbohydrates
* Steroid Saponins
* Vitamins
* Polysaccarods
Safed Musli is used as an –
* Aphrodisiac agent and vitalizer.
* As a general sex tonic.
* Remedy for Diabetes.
* As a cure for Arthritis.
* As a curative for Natal and Post-Natal problems.
* For Rheumetism and Joint Pains.

*For therapeutic application in ayurvedi, unani, Allopathic.

*Curative of many physical illness and weakness.

*It has spermatogenic property and helpful in curing impotency as they are rich in glycosides.

*For increasing general boddy immunity.

*Used in PAN and GUTKHA.

*Root powder fried in the GHEE, CHEWED in case of apthae of mouth and throat.

8*Curative of Natal and post Natal problems.

Above all these SAFED MUSLI (SAFED MOOSLI) is found very effective in increasing male potency.
It is considered as alternative to Viagra.

Demand:
The Demand of SAFED MOOSLI (35000 tons/Annum) is much higher then the supply/collection (5000 tons/annum).

Looking to the increasing demand and alarming dangers, it has become inevitable to undertake the commercial cultivation of the SAFED MUSLI

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/CropFactSheets/safedmoosli.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorophytum
http://www.apexherbex.com/herbs3.htm#Chlorophytum%20Borivilianum
http://www.jeevanherbs.com/safed-musli.html
http://www.motherherbs.com/safed-musli.html
http://hramit.en.ec21.com/product_detail.

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