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Herbs & Plants

Ranabili

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Botanical Name : Cipadessa baccifera
Family: Meliaceae (Neem family)
Synonyms: Melia baccifera, Cipadessa fruticosa
Common name: Ranabili

Hindi : nalbila

Kannada :  cheduveera, chittunde, hanoyi, hanumana thoppalu, mandala kaayi, padavali, sidigolu, sitthunde gida, sidugoli, adusoge, hanumantatoppalu, adasaage, bettadabaevu, chaedu beera, chithunde, hanumantatap, mendala kaayi, minnamunni, narachalu gida

Malayalam :   pulippanchedi

Marathi : ranabili, gudmai

Oriya ; pittamari

Tamil : savattuchedi, pulippanchedi, pullipamcheddi, cannatturukka vempu, cevvattai1, pulippan#, pulippan@

Telugu : chedubira, chedu bira, chend bera, rana beri, turaka vepa, hanumantha-bira, chandbera, chanduvira, pottu vepa, purudona, purudonda, ranabilla, thabate, thavitegu

Habitat :Indomalaysia; in the Western_Ghats- throughout.This species is globaly distributed in Indo-Malesia. It is said to be cultivated in Hawaii and under glass in Europe. Within India, it has been recorded in Bihar, Orissa and in the eastern Himalayas up to 1500 m., Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. It is found in ravines, rock crevices and in thickets and forest edge habitats.

Description:
Ranabili is a shrub 1-4 m tall, with coarse bark. Young branches are grayish brown, ribbed, and covered with yellow velvety hairs and sparse grayish white lenticels. Leaves are compound, 8-30 cm long, with leaf-stalk and spine either hairless or yellow velvety. Leaflets are usually 9-13, opposite, ovate to ovoid-oblong, 3.5-10 × 1.5-5 cm. Flowers are born in clusters 8-15 cm long. Flowers are white, 3-4 mm in diameter. Flower stalks are 1-1.5 mm long. Sepal cup is short, yellow velvety outside. Sepals are broadly triangular. Petals are white or yellow, linear to oblong-elliptic, 2-3.5 mm, outside covered with sparse appressed velvety hairs. Stamens are shorter than petals, with hairy filaments. Fruit is purple to black when mature, round, 4-5 mm in diameter. Flowering: April-October.
click to see the pictures…

 

Medicinal uses: Juice of the root is given in cases of indigestion. It is also used in treating cough and cold. A paste of bark is pressed against the teeth for about 15 mins to relieve bleeding and swelling of gums.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Ranabili.html
http://envis.frlht.org.in/botanical_search.php?txtbtname=Cipadessa+baccifera&gesp=2522%7CCipadessa+baccifera+%28ROTH.%29+MIQ.
http://www.biotik.org/india/species/c/cipabacc/cipabacc_en.html

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Herbs & Plants

Borassus flabellifer

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Botanical Name :Borassus flabellifer
Family: Arecaceae
Genus: Borassus.
Species: B. flabellifer
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Arecales

Common names: Palmyra palm, toddy or wine palm, siwalan, rontal, lontar, talauriksha palm,Asian Palmyra palm, Toddy palm, sugar palm, or Cambodian palm.
Bengali Name :Tal gach

English name: Palmyra-palm, Brab Tree.

Habitat : Distribution: India, Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia, New Guinea

Description & different uses of the tree parts :
Borassus flabellifer, also known as the  is robust and can live 100 years or more and reach a height of 30 m, with a canopy of leaves several dozen fronds spreading 3 meters across. The large trunk resembles that of the coconut tree and is ringed with leaf scars. Young palmyra palms grow slowly in the beginning but then grow faster. Its growth pattern, large size, and clean habits make it an attractive landscape species.
click to see the pictures..>.....(01)..(1)..(2)...(3)(4).………………………….
Fruit:
It is known as Tala in Odia, Tnaot in Khmer, Thot Not in Vietnamese, Tari in Hindi, Tal in Bengali, Tale Hannu in Kannada, Nungu in Tamil, Thaati Munjalu in Telugu, Munjal in Urdu, Lontar in Indonesian, Siwalan in Javanese, Ton Taan in Thai, Akadiru by the East Timorese, Tao in Divehi, Tadfali (pronunciation variations are Tad-fali or Taadfali) in Gujarati, Targula in Konkani, TadGola  in Marathi and sometimes Ice-apple in British English. The fruit measures 4 to 7 inches in diameter, has a black husk, and is borne in clusters. The top portion of the fruit must be cut off to reveal the three sweet jelly seed sockets, translucent pale-white, similar to that of the lychee but with a milder flavor and no pit. The jelly part of the fruit is covered with a thin, yellowish-brown skin.
click to see the picture
The ripened fibrous outer layer of the palm fruits can also be eaten raw, boiled, or roasted.

Tadi collection using traditional method in coastal Maharashtra] Palm shoot is cut and the juice is traditionally collected in hanging earthen pot. The juice so collected before morning is refreshing and light drink called Neera  in Marathi- has extremely cool in sensation, and sugary sweet taste. The juice collected in evening or after fermentation becomes sour – is called Tadi  in Marathi. Tadi is consumed by coastal Maharashtra mostly by villagers as raw alcoholic beverage.

A sugary sap, called toddy, can be obtained from the young inflorescence, either male or female ones. Toddy is fermented to make a beverage called arrack, or it is concentrated to a crude sugar called jaggery. It is called Gula Jawa (Javanese sugar) in Indonesia and is widely used in Javanese cuisine. In addition, the tree sap is taken as a laxative, and medicinal values have been ascribed to other parts of the plant.

Sprouts:
In the states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, India, and in Jaffna, Sri Lanka, the seeds are planted and made to germinate and the fleshy stems (below the surface) are boiled and eaten. It is very fibrous and nutritious, known as “Panai Kizhangu” or “Panamkizhangu” in Tamil and “Thegalu” in Telugu.
The germinated seed’s hard shell is also cut open to take out the crunchy kernel, which tastes like a sweeter water chestnut. It is called “dhavanai” in Tamil.

Leaves
The leaves are used for thatching, mats, baskets, fans, hats, umbrellas, and as writing material.

In Indonesia the leaves were used in the ancient culture as paper, known as “lontar”. Leaves of suitable size, shape, texture, and maturity are chosen and then seasoned by boiling in salt water with turmeric powder, as a preservative. The leaves are then dried. When they are dry enough, the face of the leaf is polished with pumice, cut into the proper size, and a hole is made in one corner. Each leaf will make four pages. The writing is done with a stylus and has a very cursive and interconnected style. The leaves are then tied up as sheaves.

Trunk
The stalks are used to make fences and also produce a strong, wiry fiber suitable for cordage and brushes. The black timber is hard, heavy, and durable and is highly valued for construction.
click to see the picture
The young plants are cooked as a vegetable or roasted and pounded to make meal.

Crown
When the crown of the tree is removed, the segment from which the leaves grow out is an edible cake. This is called pananchoru in Tamil.

Inflorescences
Palms generally start to form inflorescences at the beginning of the dry season (November to January). The male and female inflorescences are carried on separate trees: the male tree begins to develop the inflorescence in November or December while the female tree commences one to two months later. Each palm may bear from eight to fifteen inflorescences per year. The male inflorescence lasts approximately 45 to 60 days and the female 60 to 70 days. Both male and female inflorescences are “tapped” for juice collection. Some palms, especially the female, also have inflorescences during the rainy season. Cambodian tappers have developed a technique to conserve inflorescences to be tapped after the normal harvest period.

Juice…....CLICK & SEE
The most important product of the sugar palm is the sap or juice, the production of which lasts for five to six months. Cambodian tappers use long bamboo poles with the stumpy remnants of leaf bases at the nodes that serve as rudimentary steps for climbing. These are rivetted permanently to the base of the trunk during the juice-collecting period. For safety reasons the tapper replaces the bamboo poles every production period (six to twelve months). When the trees are located close to each other, one or two long bamboo poles are used as an aerial “stairway” to facilitate movement between the trees, thus avoiding the need to descend and ascend each tree and permitting the tapper to use his time (there are no female tappers) more productively. Tappers are capable of tapping 20 to 30 palm trees twice a day provided an assistant is available at the base of the trunk to receive the collected juice.
CLICK & SEE

Palm syrup and palm sugar
A considerable amount of energy is required to condense palm juice into syrup or sugar; about 4 kg of fuelwood is needed to produce 1 kg of palm syrup (Khieu Borin, Preston and Lindberg, 1996). Cambodian farmers continue producing palm syrup and sugar because they can still find free fuelwood and it is their main income during the dry season. However, if an opportunity cost were put on the fuelwood it would often exceed the value of the syrup produced.

Sugar palm juice is traditionally processed into three types of sugar: liquid sugar (sugar palm syrup), crystalline palm sugar and block sugar. The most common type consumed in rural areas is sugar palm syrup which is about 80 percent dry matter.

Live stock feeding

The price of cereal grains and by-products used in pig and poultry feeding is increasing rapidly. The industrial livestock sector with guaranteed market outlets for its products is still able to absorb these cost increases. But the consequences for the landless and the poorest farmers are serious as competition develops between humans and animals for the same food supply. It becomes increasingly urgent, therefore, to develop alternative feeding systems for livestock which do not use cereal grains, but which make efficient use of the products derived from the plant resources that grow most abundantly in a tropical country such as Cambodia.

Palm powder

A cheap and widely available agro-waste may help mop up radioactive uranium from the environment, according to a study by researchers at the MS University of Baroda.

The technique of feeding liquid sugar-based diets to pigs was first developed and commercialized in Cuba using molasses derived from the processing of sugar cane (Preston et al., 1998). Later, in Mexico, the technology was modified to use the juice from freshly crushed sugar cane stalks (Mena, Elliot and Preston, 1981). In 1987 this system began to be applied widely in Colombia (Sarria, Solano and Preston, 1990) stimulated by the low market prices at that time for cane sugar. Artisan crushing of sugar cane for processing into brown sugar is a common practice in many Asian countries, and the alternative use of the fresh juice for pig feeding was well received in remote areas of the Philippines and Viet Nam where pig production offered a more profitable outlet for the sugar cane than raw sugar.
In Cambodia, the adaptation of the pig feeding system from sugar cane to sugar palm was relatively straight- forward, as in each case the soluble carbohydrates in the juice were a mixture of sucrose and the reducing sugars, glucose and fructose.

Medicinal Uses:
The juice obtained by excision of the spadix is cooling, stimulant, antiphlegmatic and useful in inflammatory dropsy. The ashes of the flowering stalks are antiperiodic; useful in enlarged spleen. It is a good antacid in heartburn. The sugar-candy produced from the juice is used in coughs and pulmonary affection. The fruit is stomachic, aphrodisiac, antibilious, tonic, laxative, alexiteric; improves taste and allays thirst. Milky juice from immature fruit checks hiccup sickness. Pulp from the immature fruit is diuretic, demulcent and nutritive. The juice of the young leaves mixed with water is given in cases of dysentery. Root is cooling and restorative; useful in leprosy.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borassus_flabellifer
http://www.plantapalm.com/vpe/photos/Species/borassus_flabellifer.htm
http://www.fao.org/ag/aga/agap/FRG/FEEDback/War/W9980T/w9980e04.htm

http://www.mpbd.info/plants/borassus-flabellifer.php

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Latakasturi

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Botanical Name : Abelmoscnus moschatus  Medic
Family :Malvaceae
Genus : Abelmoschus

Species : moschatus

Kingdom: Plantae

Division : Magnolophyta

Class :Magnoliopsida

order : Malvales

Common Names:
•English : Musk mallow, Ambrette seed Plant
•Hindi : Latakasturi, Maskdana
•Kannada : Kadukasturi
•Malayalam : Latakasuri Kattukasturi, Kasturiveta
•Sanskrit : Latakasturika
•Tamil : Vattrilaikkasturi, Kattukkasturi
•Telugu : Kasturibendavittu

Habitat :
This species is native to the old world tropics, globally distributed in the Paleotropics. Within India, it is found throughout Peninsular India and in Himalayan foothills. It is cultivated in Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh & Bangladesh.

Description:
An erect hirsute or hispid annual herb, 60 – 180 cm in height; leaves simple, of varying shapes, usually palmately 3-7 lobed, lobes narrow-acute or oblong-ovate, crenate, serrate or irregularly toothed, hairy on both surfaces: flowers large, yellow with purple centre; fruits fulvous-hairy, capsular: seeds many, subreniform, black or grayish brown, scented.

You may click to see the pictures of  Latakasturi

Chemical Constituents:
-D-glucoside, myricetin b-Sitosterol and its b and its glucoside obtained from leaves and petals; dry fruit husk yielded only -sitosterol b

Medicinal Uses:
Used In Ayurveda, Folk and Unani for treating different diseases like the following:.
*Tastelessness
*Mouth related ailments
*Indigestion
*Loss of appetite
*Diarrhea
*Cough, cold and asthma
*Dysurea
*Gonorrhea
*Decreased sperm count
*Erectile dysfunction
*Eyes related ailments

Powder of seeds is being used in ailments related to oral cavity, digestion and diarrhea. It is also used in heart related problems, respiratory troubles and asthma. It is used in urine related problems and diseases like gonorrhea. It works as aphrodisiac agent also. Powder is also being used in eye related troubles

Lata kasturi is kapha and pitta suppressant. It helps in purification of the mouth and improves taste of the mouth. It improves digestive activities in the body. It is effective in diarrhea. It helps in heart muscles toning. Respiration system is also checked by it and helps in expelling out the extra amount of mucus in the tract. It also helps in checking out the urinary tract and its related ailments. It is widely used as aphrodisiac agents it improves sperm counts and erectile dysfunction.

According to ayurveda it contains
•Gunna (properties) – ruksh (dry), tikshan (sharp) and laghu (light)
•Rasa (taste) – tickt (bitter), katu (pungent) and madhur (sweet)
•Virya (potency) – sheet (cold)

You may click to see :
Abelmoschus moschatus (Malvaceae), an aromatic plant, suitable for medical or food uses to improve insulin sensitivity.:

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.ayushveda.com/herbs/abelmoschus-moschatus.htm
http://envis.frlht.org.in/botanical_search.php?txtbtname=&gesp=7%7CAbelmoschus+moschatus+MEDIK.
http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp
http://www.ishanherbotechorganic.com/herbsbybotanical.html
http://plants.jstor.org/visual/pdig00001725

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Herbs & Plants

Indian Spinach (Basella alba)

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Botanical Name :Basella alba
Family : Basellaceae
Genus : Basella
Synonyms :   Basella rubra – L.

Common Names:   Malabar spinach, white stem Malabar spinach, Ceylon spinach, Indian spinach, white vine spinach, vine spinach, Malabar nightshade, country spinach, bertalha vermelha, Malabarspinat, basela branca, bertalha branca, basela vermelha, melao de soldado, sabao de soldado.
Vernacular Names:
English:
Malabar-, Malabar climbing-, Ceylon-, Indian-, East-Indian-, Surinam-, Chinese-, Vietnamese- or buffalo spinach (although it is not closely related to spinach), as well as Malabar nightshade or broad bologi.
Bengali: Pui shak
Oriya: Poi saaga
Konkani: Valchi bhaji
Kannada: Basale soppu
Telugu: Bachhali
Tamil: Kodip pasaLi .
Marathi: Mayalu
Filipino: Alugbati
Vietnamese: Mong toi
Other:
Poi baagi, calaloo, alugbati

Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Caryophyllales
Species: B. alba


Habitat :
Range E. Asia. Africa.   Moist places in hedges to elevations of about 500 metres in Nepal .Cultivated Beds;

Description:

A coarse, trailing or twining vine with short-petioled, cordate, and succulent leaves. It has black berries. USES Boiled as a green vegetable. The berries are dried, the pulp ground and used as food coloring.It is a  Short-lived fast-growing, soft-stemmed  Perennial  vine , reaching 10 m in length. Its thick, semi-succulent, heart-shaped leaves have a mild flavour and mucilaginous texture. The stem of the cultivar Basella alba ‘Rubra’ is reddish-purple. it is widely used as a leaf vegetable. Harvest period 55-180 days after transplanting.

click to see the pictures…>…..(01).(1)……..(2)..…….(3).…..(4)…....(5)...……

It is hardy to zone 10 and is frost tender. It is in flower from May to September, and the seeds ripen from July to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soil. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
Requires a well-drained moisture-retentive soil rich in organic matter and a warm sunny sheltered position. Prefers a sandy loam. Tolerates fairly poor soils but does much better in rich soils. Tolerates high rainfall. Tolerates a pH in the range 4.3 to 7. A frost-tender perennial, it is not hardy outdoors in Britain but can be grown as a spring-sown annual.   A fast growing plant, capable of producing a crop within 70 days from seed in a warm climate, though it requires a minimum daytime temperature of 15°c if it is to keep growing vigorously so it seldom does well outdoors in Britain. It does tolerate low light levels plus night temperatures occasionally falling below 10°c, and so can do well in a cold greenhouse. Plants do not flower if the length of daylight is more than 13 hours per day.   Widely cultivated for its edible leaves in the tropics, there are some named varieties. It is an excellent hot weather substitute for spinach. Some authorities recognize three different species, B. alba, B. rubra and B. cordifolia, they are all treated here as being part of one species.

Propagation
Seed – sow March or April in a warm greenhouse. The seed requires a minimum temperature of 18 – 21°c in order to germinate, it germinates within 10 – 21 days at 20°c, pre-soaking the seed for 24 hours in warm water shortens the germination time. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots of fairly rich compost and grow them on fast, planting them out after the last expected frosts. Stem cuttings.  These can be taken in the late summer, overwintered in a greenhouse and then be planted out in late spring or early summer.

Cultivars
‘Eclipse’
Producing a crop in 55 – 60 days in warm areas, this is a very early cultivar producing small and compact plants that can be planted close together. The leaves are thick and medium to deep green in colour.   Yields very well under warm humid conditions.
‘Red’
The leaves, stems and flowers are tinged with red. The colour is lost when the plant is cooked and so it is best used in salads.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Edible Uses: Colouring; Tea.

Leaves and stem tips – raw or cooked. A pleasant mild spinach flavour, the leaves can be used as a spinach or added to salads. Do not overcook the leaves or they will become slimy. The mucilaginous qualities of the plant make it an excellent thickening agent in soups, stews etc where it can be used as a substitute for okra, Abelmoschatus esculentus. A nutritional analysis of the leaves is available. An infusion of the leaves is a tea substitute. The purplish sap from the fruit is used as a food colouring in pastries and sweets. The colour is enhanced by adding some lemon juice.

Typical of leaf vegetables, Malabar spinach is high in vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, and calcium. It is low in calories by volume, but high in protein per calorie. The succulent mucilage is a particularly rich source of soluble fiber. Among many other possibilities, Malabar spinach may be used to thicken soups or stir-fries with garlic and chili peppers.

In Bangladesh it is widely used to cook with Hilsa fish.

The vegetable is used in Chinese cuisine. Its many names include flowing water vegetable.

In Vietnam, particularly the north, it is cooked with crab meat, luffa and jute to make soup.

In Orissa, India, it is used to make Curries and Saaga (Any type of dish made from green leafy vegetables is called as Saaga in Orissa). In Maharashtra, India, it is used to make bhaji.

In Africa, the mucilaginous cooked shoots are most commonly used.

Malabar spinach can be found at many Chinese/Vietnamese/Korean/Indian grocery stores, as well as farmers’ markets

Constituents:
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.

Leaves (Dry weight)
275 Calories per 100g
Water: 0%
Protein: 20g; Fat: 3.5g; Carbohydrate: 54g; Fibre: 9g; Ash: 19g;
Minerals – Calcium: 3000mg; Phosphorus: 0mg; Iron: 0mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
Vitamins – A: 50mg; Thiamine (B1): 0.7mg; Riboflavin (B2): 1.8mg; Niacin: 7.5mg; B6: 0mg; C: 1200mg;
:
Medicinal Actions &  Uses

Antidote; Aperient; Astringent; Demulcent; Diuretic; Febrifuge; Laxative; Rubefacient.

Astringent – the cooked roots are used in the treatment of diarrhoea. Laxative – the cooked leaves and stems are used. The flowers are used as an antidote to poisons . A paste of the root is applied to swellings and is also used as a rubefacient. The plant is febrifuge, its juice is a safe aperient for pregnant women and a decoction has been used to alleviate labour. The leaf juice is a demulcent, used in cases of dysentery. It is also diuretic, febrifuge and laxative. The leaf juice is used in Nepal to treat catarrh. A paste of the leaves is applied externally to treat boils.

Other Uses
Dye.

A red dye is obtained from the juice of the fruits. It has been used as a rouge and also as a dye for official seals.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

 

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Basella+alba
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basella_alba
http://www.greenchem.biz/Images/ProductImages/pageproducts.php?no=17
http://www.friendsschoolplantsale.com/archives/date/2009/03/

http://ecocrop.fao.org/ecocrop/srv/en/cropView?id=504

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Herbs & Plants

Kurchi (Holarrhena pubescence)

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Botanical Name:Holarrhena pubescence (Buch.-Ham.) Wall ex DC. (Apocynaceae)
Family : Apocynaceae

Syn : Holarrhena antidysenterica (L.) Wall., Echites pubescens Buch.-Ham.

English names: Bitter oleander, Conessi bark, Dysentery rosebay, Easter tree, Ivory tree, Tellichery bark.

Sanskrit names: Girimallika, Indrayava, Kalinga(ka), Kalingyava, Katuka, Katuja, Mahagandha, Mallikapushpa, Panduradruama, Pravrishya, Sangrahi, Shakrapadapa, Vatsika, Vrikshaka, Yavaphala.

Vernacular names: Asm : Dhurkhuri, Ducikhuri; Ben: Kurchi, Katuraj, Kuteswar, Indrajava; Guj : Dhowda, Kuda, Kari; Hin : Kurchi, Karchi, Karra; Kan : Beppale coodsaloo, Korchie; Lep : Fajeerip; Mal: Kodagapala; Mar: Kura, Kala-kura, Kear, Kewar, Kodago, Kuda, Dola-kuda, Pandhrakura;’Mun : Ludu-ba, Toa-ba; Nep : Khuria; Ori : Kherwa, Pita, Korwa, Patru kurwa; Orn : Koraia; Pun: Kawar, Kura, Kear, Kewar; Sad: Koraia; San: Hat; Tam: Kuda-sappalai, Veppalei, Kodagapalei, Indrabam; Tel: Kodisepala, Palakodsa, Pala, Kodaga.

Trade name: Kurchi.

Habitat : Major parts of India up to 1500 m in the Himalaya; Bangladesh, also in Africa-mostly in drier regions.Native to: tropical areas of Africa and Asia

Description:
Deciduous tree or large shrub; leaves sessile or subsessile, broadly ovate to elliptic-oblong, abruptly acuminate, often unequal, rounded or obtuse at base, lateral nerves 10-15 pairs, arching near the margin; flowers white(very sweet smell), bracts small, follicles 20-42 by 0.8-1.2 cm; seeds up to 1 cm long, linear-oblong, coma about twice as long as seeds, seeds brown.

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Flowering and Fruiting: May-January.

Ecology and cultivation
: Common in village surroundings; sometimes in private gardens.

Chemical contents: Root-bark: holacetine; Stem-bark: L-quebrachitol, dihydroisoconessimine, kurcholessine, 3-a-aminoconan-5-ene, 7-a-OH-conessine, holonamine; Leaf: aminoglycosteroids, aminode-oxyglycosteroids, kurchiphylline, kurchiphyllamine, kurchaline, holadysine, holadysamine, holantosines A, B, C & D, holarosine A, B, E & F.

Medicinal Uses:

Traditional use: MANIPURI : Bark (boiled extract) : in diarrhoea, dysentery; GARO : Bark and Leaf: in dysentery; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES AROUND GUAHATI: Seed: as anthelmintic; BODO (of Assam) : Bark: in diarrhoea, dysentery, piles; Flower: as appetiser and in intestinal worms; Seed.. in leprosy; ASUR (of Bihar) : Bark: in snake bite; Seed: diarrhoea, fever, intestinal worms; MUNDA : Root and Leaf: in diarrhoea, bleeding from nose, haemorrhage after childbirth; SANTAL : Root: in bite of dog or jackal, blood and mucous in bowel excretion, diarrhoea, dysentery, hematuria, spermatorrhoea, spleen complaints; Bark.. in bronchitis, chameleon’s bite, cholera, cold, colic, fever, menorrhagia; Fruit: in anaemia, colic, constip5ltion, diarrhoea, dry cough, epilepsy, gravel, postnatal complaints, stomachache; TRIBAL SOCIETIES OF HAZARIBAGH AND RANCHI : Bark: in gastric disorder, to revive taste in tongue; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF ORISSA: Latex: in eczema and other skin diseases; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF ABUJH-MARH (Madhya Pradesh) : Bark: in menstrual complaints; TRIBAL COMMUNITIES OF SAGAR (Madhya Pradesh) : Seed: in dysentery; THARU (of Uttar Pradesh) : Bark: in fever; Bark and Seed (together) : in dysentery; KOL (of Uttar Pradesh) : Seed: in digestive complaints; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF DEHRA DUN AND SIWALIK: Seed: in diarrhoea, dysentery, fever; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF EAST RAJASTHAN: Bark and Seed (together) : in dysentery; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF MOUNT ABU: Bark: as antidote to snake bite; DANG: (of Gujarat ): Bark: in diarrhoea; VASAVA (of Gujarat ) : Root: in fever; Root and Bark (together) : in gout; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF SAURASHTRA: Bark: in bronchitis; ETHNIC COMMUNITIES OF DAHANU FOREST DIVISION (Maharashtra) : Bark and Leaf (together) : in dysentery; Latex: as antidote to snake bite, Seed: in asthma, colic.

ATHARVAVEDA : increases semen, tightens the slackened muscles; CHARAKA SAMHITA : Bark (paste) : good for skin diseases, leprosy, ringworm, piles, fistula, adenitis; Fruit: in vomiting, beneficial in disorders caused by vitiated phlegm and bile, as galactagogue; Seed: in piles; SUSHRUTA SAMHITA: Flower: beneficial in deranged phlegm and bile, and a good remedy for leprosy; CHAKRADATTA: Bark: in diarrhoea; BHAVAPRAKASHA: pungent, drying, refrigerant, excitant, cures piles, diarrhoea, phlegm, bile, leprosy, alleviates thirst; RAJANIGHANTU : pungent, bitter, thermogenic, astringent, cures diarrhoea, vitiated bile, skin diseases and piles; DHANVANTARINIGHANTU: pungent, bitter, astringent, drying, cooling, cures skin diseases, gastroenteritis, vitiated bile; MADANANIGHANTU : excitant, digestive, astringent, beneficial in bleeding tendency, worms, skin diseases; SALIGRAMNIGHANTU : appetising, beneficial in vitiated phlegm, cures diarrhoea, skin diseases, worms; KAIYADEVANIGHANTU : astringent, cooling, drying, excitant, pungent, beneficial in vitiated phlegm, bile, skin diseases, diarrhoea, piles; Flower: refrigerant, bitter, astringent, excitant.

AYURVEDA:
Bark and Seed: acrid, anthelmintic, antiperiodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bitter, carminative, expectorant, febrifuge, stimulating, beneficial in asthma, bronchitis! blood dysentery, diarrhoea, dropsy, dysentery, fever, haemorrhages, haemorrhoides, hepatopathy, malaria, piles, rheumatism, skin diseases, urinary troubles, verminosis, vomiting; Leaf: useful in boils, bronchitis, dysentery and wounds.

SIDDHA:
Root and Bark: used as constituents for the preparation of Kutacap patai.

UNANI : in the preparation of Sufuf Habis and Majnum Bawasir.

Click to see:> Research Article By Pankaj Oudhia on Kurchi

Modern use: Bark (50% EtOH extract) : hypotensive; Bark-powder: in abdominal and glandular tumours; Fruit (50% EtOH extract) : anticancer, anti protozoa, hypoglycaemic, astringent, febrifuge, useful in diarrhoea, intestinal worms, and to regulate menstruation.

Remarks: Tribals of East Rajasthan give root to cattle in a disease in which tongue ejects out and gets swollen. Tribals of Maharashtra eat flower and seed as vegetables. Ethnic communities of Ratan Mahal Hills use latex to curdle milk. Santal women use flowers to decorate their hairdos. Tribals of Madhya Pradesh use wood to make combs and many household articles.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.bsienvis.org/medi.htm#Euphorbia%20tirucalli
http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Conessi

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