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Zanthoxylum piperitum

Botanical Name : Zanthoxylum piperitum
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Zanthoxylum
Species:Z. piperitum
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Sapindales

Synonyms : Fagara piperita

Common Names : Japanese pepper, Japanese pricklyash, or Sansh (Japanese)

Habitat :Zanthoxylum piperitum is native to E. Asia – N. China, Japan, Korea. It grows in scrub and hedges in hills and mountains in Japan.

Description:
Zanthoxylum piperitum is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2 m (6ft) by 2 m (6ft). The tree blooms in April to May, forming axillary flower clusters, about 5mm, and yellow-green in color. It is dioecious, and the flowers of the male plant can be consumed as hana-sansh, while the female flowers yield berries or peppercorns of about 5mm. For commercial harvesting, thornless varieties called the Asakura sansho are widely cultivated. Around September to October, the berries turn scarlet and burst, scattering the black seeds within.The plant is not self-fertile.
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The branch grows pairs of sharp thorns, and has odd-pinnately compound leaves, alternately arranged, with 5?9 pairs of ovate leaflets having crenate (slightly serrated) margins.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
Easily grown in loamy soils in most positions, but prefers a good deep well-drained moisture retentive soil in full sun or semi-shade. A very ornamental plant, it is hardy to about -15°c. Flowers are formed on the old wood. The bruised leaves are amongst the most powerfully aromatic of all leaves. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Self-sown seedlings have occasionally been observed growing in bare soil under the parent plant.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Stored seed may requires up to 3 months cold stratification, though scarification may also help. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Germination should take place in late spring, though it might take another 12 months. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Root cuttings, 3cm long, planted horizontally in pots in a greenhouse. Good percentage. Suckers, removed in late winter and planted into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses:
The finely ground Japanese pepper, kona-zansh?, is nowadays usually sold in sealed packets, and individual serving sizes are included inside heat-and-serve broiled eel packages. While red chili pepper is never used on eel, otherwise, in many usages, the Japanese red chili pepper, or the shichimi blend of peppers can be used in lieu of Japanese pepper alone, according to taste: e.g., to flavor miso soup, various noodles in broth or dipped in tsuyu, Japanese pickles (tsukemono), teriyaki or fried chicken.

Young leaves and shoots, pronounced ki no mé or ko no mé (Japanese: lit. “tree-bud”) herald the spring season, and often garnish grilled fish and soups. They have a distinctive flavor and is not to the liking of everyone. It is a customary ritual to put a leaf between cupped hands, and clap the hands with a popping sound, this supposedly serving to bring out the aroma. The young leaves are crushed and blended with miso using pestle and mortar (suribachi and surikogi) to make a paste, a pesto sauce of sorts, and then used to make various aemono (or “tossed salad”, for lack of a better word). The stereotypical main ingredient for the resultant kinome-ae is the fresh harvest of bamboo shoots, but the sauce may be tossed (or delicately “folded”, to use a pastrymaking term) into sashimi, clams, squid or other vegetable such as tara-no-me (Aralia elata shoots).
The immature green berries, blanched and salted, are called ao-zansh? (lit. “green sansho”). The berries are traditionally simmered into dark-brown tsukudani, but nowadays are also available as shoyu-zuke, which is just steeped in soy sauce. The berries are also cooked with small fry fish and flavored with soy sauce (chirimen jako[ja]), a specialty item of Kyoto, since its Mount Kurama outskirts is a renowned growing area of the Japanese pepper.

The thornless variety Asakura sansho derives its name from its place of origin, the Asakura district in the now defunct Yokacho[ja], integrated into Yabu, Hy?go.

Wakayama Prefecture boasts 80% of domestic production. Aridagawa, Wakayama procuces a specialty variety called bud? sansh? (“grape sansho”), which bears large fruits and clusters, rather like a bunch of grapes.

Confections:
In central and northeastern Japan, a non-sticky rice-cake type confection called goheimochi [ja], which is basted with miso-based paste and grilled, sometimes uses the Japanese pepper as flavor additive to the miso. Also being marketed are sansho flavored arare (rice crackers), snack foods, and sweet sansho-mochi.

Medicinal Uses:
Antiperiodic, antitussive, carminative, diuretic, parasiticide, stimulant. The fruit contains a essential oil, flavonoids and isoquinoline alkaloids. It is anthelmintic, antibacterial, antifungal and stomachic. It inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin and, in larger doses, is toxic to the central nervous system. It is used in Korea in the treatment of tuberculosis, dyspepsis and internal parasites. The resin contained in the bark, and especially in that of the roots, is powerfully stimulant and tonic.

The husks are used medicinally. In traditional Chinese medicine it finds uses similar to the hua jiao or Sichuan pepper.

In Japanese pharmaceuticals, the mature husks with seeds removed are considered the crude medicine form of sansh?. It is an ingredient in bitter tincture[lange]. It also contains aromatic oils geraniol, dipentene, citral, etc.

Other Uses:
Timber uses: The thick wood of the tree is traditionally made into a gnarled and rough-hewn wooden pestle, to use with the aforementioned suribachi.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_piperitum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zanthoxylum+piperitum

Ash, Prickly (Xanthoxylum Americanum)

Botanical Name: Xanthoxylum Americanum (MILL.)

Family: N.O. Rutacea
Subfamily: Toddalioideae
Genus: Zanthoxylum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales

Synonyms: Toothache Tree. Yellow Wood. Suterberry. Clava-herculis and americanum
Common NamesPrickly Ash Bark , Szechuan pepper, chuan jiao, Tooth Ache Tree, yellow wood,Hercules’ Club.
Parts Used: Root-bark, berries.

Habitat : Native to central and eastern portions of the United States and Canada.  Rare in the South, it is more common in the northern United States. It is listed as Endangered in Florida, Maryland, and New Hampshire; and as Special Concern in Tennessee. It can be found in Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Washington, DC, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin and West Virginia in the United States, and in Ontario and Quebec in Canada. It is found on upland rocky hillsides and on moist low-lying sites, in open woods, on bluffs or in thickets.

Taxonomy
Originally described by Scottish botanist Philip Miller in 1768, Zanthoxylum americanum is a member of the wide-ranging genus Zanthoxylum in the Rutaceae family, which includes many species with aromatic foliage. Miller, who spelled the name Xanthoxylum, described the plant in the eighth edition of his Gardeners Dictionary, as “grow[ing] naturally in Pensylvania [sic] and Maryland


Description:

It is  is an aromatic shrub or tree .It can grow to 10 meters (33 ft) tall with a diameter at breast height (DBH) of 15 centimeters (5.9 in). It produces membranous leaflets and axillary flower clusters. The wood is not commercially valuable, but oil extracts from the bark have been used in alternative medicine and have been studied for antifungal and cytotoxic properties

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The plant has membranous leaflets numbering between 5-11 and growing in opposite pairs. It has “axillary flower and fruit clusters”. The buds are hairy. Dark green leaves are bitter-aromatic, with crenate margins.  The berries begin red   and turn deep blue to black,   with stalked fruit pods.   Flowers are dioecious, with yellow-green petals.
Cultivation:
Prefers a good deep well-drained moisture retentive soil in full sun or semi-shade. A relatively fast-growing plant in the wild, it often forms thickets by means of root suckers. All parts of the plant are fragrant. The bruised foliage has a delicious resinous orange-like perfume. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Flowers are formed on the old wood[206]. Special Features:North American native, Attracts butterflies, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms, Blooms appear periodically throughout the year.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Stored seed may requires up to 3 months cold stratification, though scarification may also help. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Germination should take place in late spring, though it might take another 12 months. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Root cuttings, 3cm long, planted horizontally in pots in a greenhouse. Good percentage. Suckers, removed in late winter and planted into their permanent positions.
Edible Uses: Condiment.

Seed – cooked. It is used as a condiment. A pepper substitute. The fruit is rather small, about 4 – 5m in diameter, but is produced in dense clusters which makes harvesting easy. Each fruit contains a single seed.

Constituents:
The barks of numerous species of Xanthoxylum and the allied genus Fagara have been used medicinally. There are two principal varieties of Prickly Ash in commerce: X. Americanum (Northern Prickly Ash) and Fagara Clava-Herculis (Southern Prickly Ashj, which is supposed to be more active. Although not absolutely identical, the two Prickly Ash barks are very similar in their active constituents. Both contain small amounts of volatile oil, fat, sugar, gum, acrid resin, a bitter alkaloid, believed to be Berberine and a colourless, tasteless, inert, crystalline body, Xanthoxylin, slightly different in the two barks. Both yield a large amount of Ash: 12 per cent. or more. The name Xanthoxylin is also applied to a resinous extractive prepared by pouring a tincture of the drug into water.

The fruits of both the species are used similarly to the barks. Their constituents have not been investigated, but they apparently agree in a general way with those of the bark.

The drug is practically never adulterated. The Northern bark occurs in commerce in curved or quilled fragments about 1/24 inch thick, externally brownish grey, with whitish patches, faintly furrowed, with some linearbased, two-edged spines about 1/4 inch long. The fracture is short, green in the outer, and yellow in the inner part. The Southern bark, which is more frequently sold, is 1/12 inch thick and has conical, corky spines, sometimes 4/5, inch in height.

Medicinal Uses:
Traditional
An oil extracted from the bark and berries of the prickly-ash (both this species and Zanthoxylum clava-herculis) is used medicinally. The extract may act as a stimulant, and historic medicinal use has included use “for chronic rheumatism, typhoid and skin diseases and impurity of the blood…” as well as for digestive ailments. Grieve states, “The berries are considered even more active than the bark, being carminative and antispasmodic, and are used as an aperient and for dyspepsia and indigestion; a fluid extract of the berries being given, in doses of 10 to 30 drops.” The bark has been chewed for toothaches, and a tea from the berries has been used for sore throats and as a diuretic.

Traditional Chinese Medicine uses prickly ash to warm the “middle burner,” the energies in the middle of the body that power the immune response and help digest food.

It acts as a stimulant – resembling guaiacum resin and mezereon bark in its remedial action and is greatly recommended in the United States for chronic rheumatism, typhoid and skin diseases and impurity of the blood, administered either in the form of fluid extract or in doses of 10 grains to 1/2 drachm in the powdered form, three times daily.

The following formula has also become popular in herbal medicine: Take 1/2 oz. each of Prickly Ash Bark, Guaiacum Raspings and Buckbean Herb, with 6 Cayenne Pods. Boil in 1 1/2 pint of water down to 1 pint . Dose: a wineglassful three or four times daily.

On account of the energetic stimulant properties of the bark, it produces when swallowed a sense of heat in the stomach, with more or less general arterial excitement and tendency to perspiration and is a useful tonic in debilitated conditions of the stomach and digestive organs, and is used in colic, cramp and colera, in fever, ague, lethargy, for cold hands and feet and complaints arising from a bad circulation.

A decoction made by boiling an ounce in 3 pints of water down to a quarter may be given in the quantity of a pint, in divided doses, during the twenty-four hours. As a counter-irritant, the decoction may be applied on compresses. It has also been used as an emmenagogue.

The powdered bark forms an excellent application to indolent ulcers and old wounds for cleansing, stimulating, drying up and healing the wounds. The pulverized bark is also used for paralytic affections and nervous headaches and as a topical irritant the bark, either in powdered form, or chewed, has been a very popular remedy for toothache in America, hence the origin of a common name of the tree in the States: Toothache Tree.

The berries are considered even more active than the bark, being carminative and antispasmodic, and are used as an aperient and for dyspepsia and indigestion; a fluid extract of the berries being given, in doses of 10 to 30 drops.

Xanthoxylin. Dose, 1 to 2 grains.

Both berries and bark are used to make a good bitter.


Modern studies

There have been some modern studies of the oil’s constituents and antifungal properties  and cytotoxic effects.

Other Uses: Landscape Uses:Border, Massing. The fruits have been used by young men as a perfume. Wood – soft. It weighs 35lb per cubic foot. Of little use.

You may click to see
:-> What Is Prickly Ash Bark? :

Known Hazaards:  Tannins may reduce gut iron absorption. Possble nervous system stimulation. Excessive ingestion may interfere with anticoagulant therapy

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail403.php
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_americanum
http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/a/ashpr077.html

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zanthoxylum+americanum

Baby Massaging

Introduction:
Baby massage is an ancient childcare practice which finds its relevance even in the contemporary medical research. Spending just twenty minutes a day massaging your baby greatly benefits her. Babies simply love to be touched and it’s a critical part of growth and development. Skin-to-skin contact comforts your baby when she’s upset and the massage sometimes even eases the symptoms of indigestion. Touch is also an important factor in physical and emotional development, as well as self esteem. Sharing the massage experience is not only calming for your baby but it also helps strengthen a bond that will last a lifetime. Studies have shown that premature babies when regularly massaged require minimum hospitalization. All newborns show healthy growth, more weight gain and thrive better if they are massaged well, regularly.
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Being a new parent can be tough with new sleeping arrangements, a demanding feeding schedule, and the constant hustle and bustle that an infant brings to the home. Yet being a newborn is no walk in the park either. Your baby has lost his familiar cozy quarters, the food is different and requires effort to obtain, and everything is, well . . . new. The result of this new living arrangement can be stress for both babies and parents. The good news is that infant massage is a great tool for managing this stress.

Research shows the benefits of infant massage, nurturing babies’ psychological, physiological, and developmental growth. Proponents of infant massage claim that it fosters healthy self-esteem and increases bonding between parents and their babies. You know how much you love your baby, but in all of  the frantic newness and exhaustion it sometimes seems that there is little time to slow down and show your baby you love him. Massage can validate those feeling of love and affection for babies and for parents.

Benefits:
The benefits of baby massage can help nurture your baby’s psychological, physiological, and developmental growth.Massaging your baby can ease his stress and pain, and even improve his sleep patterns!

*A good massage soothes and calms a baby.
*Helps them to relax and sleep better and makes them more alert during their waking hours.
*It stimulates digestion and helps the baby pass gas.
*Raises the child’s sense of self.
*Using essential oils for a special condition during the massage lessens congestion if the child has cold or stuffy nose.
*Increases blood circulation in the body.
* Improves non verbal communication between you and your baby.
*It is a good exercise which promotes motor activity and muscular development.

Brighter Babies:-
There may be other, more exciting developmental boons associated with infant massage. In a poll sponsored by Developing Minds, 86 percent of respondents indicated that they believed infant massage could stimulate childhood learning. That’s not too far off base, says Dr. Tiffany Field, PhD, founder of the

Touch Research Institute. According to Dr. Field, studies show that a five-minute massage enhances the performance of babies and children on tasks requiring attentiveness.

Rubbing your baby’s back may or may not turn him into a young Einstein, but it will help him slow down, relax, and pay attention to the world around him. Not a bad deal for something that feels so good!

Tear Taming:-
Massage can be especially beneficial for high-needs infants and may provide some relief for babies who suffer from colic or unexplained crying bouts lasting three hours or longer.

Kimberly Habib, a licensed massage therapist and certified infant massage instructor at the Huggins Center in Melrose, Massachusetts, outlines some of the possible medical benefits of massage. She says infant massage helps babies who are prone to gas, constipation, and other digestive difficulties by:

*Reducing spasms in the colon
*Expelling stuck gas
*Regulating and stimulating digestion
*Encouraging and increasing endorphin output to naturally reduce pain
*Decreasing stress-related hormones.

Of course, massage doesn’t cure colic. Jessica Riley, mother of a colicky baby, turned to infant massage to help her son. She explains, “It doesn’t do away with the colic, but it does lessen it.” Massage doesn’t always do the trick for Riley’s son, but she points out that “it’s a great bonding time anyway.”

Tiny Touches:-
Infant or baby  massage might help preemies, babies born before 37 weeks gestation, as well. Studies demonstrate that babies who are massaged in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) gain weight faster and are released from the hospital earlier than their peers.

If your baby was born prematurely, you may want to ask her neonatologist if infant massage could be appropriate. Not all NICUs embrace the technique, and in those that do, your baby’s age and weight will determine whether or not massage is indicated.

Touch Techniques:-
One way to learn more about infant massage is to take a class. Habib recommends that parents and babies start an infant massage class when the baby is about seven weeks old. Classes last four to five weeks, giving parents the opportunity to practice their techniques before returning for the next session. An added bonus is that classes are a great way to meet other new parents.

If going to class doesn’t jibe with your schedule, try the do-it-yourself route. There are several excellent resources that you can use as a guide. Any of the following is a good first start:

Videos/DVDs :-
Infant Massage, A Gift of Love (with Cheryl Brenman)
Baby Massage: A Video for Loving Parents (directed by Jim Jenner)

Books :-
Baby Massage: A Practical Guide to Massage and Movement for Babies and Infants, by Peter Walker
Loving Hands: The Traditional Art of Baby Massage, by Frederick Leboyer
Infant Massage: A Handbook for Loving Parents, by Vimala McClure
you may click & see :How To Massage Your Baby For Health And Happiness

Your Baby’s Cues
At its heart, infant massage is about responding to your baby’s cues. What time of day seems to work best for your baby? Does massage soothe him and help him sleep? If so, wait until 30 minutes before naptime. What type of strokes does your baby prefer? Are there sensations or settings that seem to disturb her?

Habib adds a few additional reminders for new parents:

Find a warm, flat surface to lay your baby on — a blanket on a carpeted floor is fine. Pour a little baby oil onto your palms and rub your hands together to warm them and the oil. Try to look into your baby’s eyes, and sing or talk to her as you do the massage. Talking and smiling to her while massaging her keeps a child happy, making the baby more secure and robust. Pay attention to your baby’s response: if she doesn’t seem to be enjoying herself, try a lighter touch, or simply stop. Here are some tips on massaging your baby:

>Pick the right time for the massage. Make sure that you are not in a hurry and your baby is not hungry, ill or tired.
>Keep all the things ready before you start, like clean diapers, clothes, warm towels etc.
>Keep the baby engaged by singing or talking to her or by giving her the favorite toy.
>Use edible oils like coconut, olive or vegetable oil. Avoid perfumed oils.
> Eye contact with the baby ensures her of your undivided attention.
> Remove the jewelry pieces on your hand which may hurt the soft skin of your baby. Also keep your fingernails short.
> Use gentle but firm strokes with your fingers or palms.
> Hold your baby’s foot with one hand, while using your other hand to stroke the length of her leg in a gentle, squeezing motion. Use the same stroke on her arms.
> Once you get to her back and tummy, begin with both hands in circular motion at the center, and then push out lightly as if you were smoothing a crumpled piece of paper.
>Avoid rashes, wounds or areas where the baby has got her injections or vaccines as it may hurt.
>Your baby should be awake during the massage.
>You shouldn’t massage your baby if he has a fever or an unknown rash.
>Don’t massage your baby if you are angry or in a rush.

If you have any questions or feel uncertain about something, ask your baby’s pediatrician. And remember, not all babies take to massage and some find it overstimulating.

Parent Pampering:-

While infant massage is great for babies and parents, there’s no reason for its stress-busting, feel-good benefits to stop with your baby. Some doctors recommend parental massage to relieve the stresses of parenting. When an exhausted parent gets a massage, she may relax and even fall asleep. Most experts agree that what’s good for parents is good for babies. So, while you’re nurturing your baby, don’t forget to indulge yourself and your partner.

Resources:
http://www.babyzone.com/baby/nurturing/crying/article/infant-massage-benefits-pg3
http://www.littlewonders.in/Care/Baby-Massage.aspx
http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-3041684.html

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Massage Therapy for Dysmenorrhea, Menoxenia

 

 

Dysmenorrhoea means painful periods. Normal menstruation that happens to be painful is known as primary dysmenorrhoea, while secondary dysmenorrhoea refers to period pain caused by certain reproductive disorders, such as endometriosis. In primary dysmenorrhoea, it is thought that the muscles of the uterus squeeze and contract harder than normal to dislodge the thickened lining. These contractions may also hamper blood flow to the uterus, exacerbating the pain. Women of any age can experience painful periods and some women find that periods are no longer painful after pregnancy and childbirth.

Step-1. Tian Zhu point:
Back of the neck,the crater for the intersection Point of the two big sinews and hairline.
Wrap up head with the hands from the back and massage the point by thumb.

Massage Therapy

Aversion To Cold – Back Pain – Dizziness – Eye Disorders – Fever Without Sweating – Headache – Headache Occipital – Nasal Congestion – Neck Muscle Stiffness And Tension – Seizures – Shoulder And Back Pain – Throat Soreness – Vertigo – Visual Disturbances

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Step-2. He Gu point
The crater for junction between thumb and forefinger.
Massage it by thumb for 1-3 minutes.

Massage Therapy
Releases the exterior for wind-cold or wind-heat syndromes .Strengthens the wei qi, improves immunity.
Abdominal Pain – Amenorrhea – Arm Pain – Constipation – Deafness – Eye Deviation – Eye Disorders – Facial Edema – Facial Muscle Paralysis – Fever Without Sweating – Finger Contraction – Headache – Hemiplegia – Intestinal Disorders – Labor Difficult – Mouth Deviation – Nosebleed – Parotitis – Respiratory Disorders – Skin Disorders – Throat Soreness – Toothache

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Step-3…Shen Shu point
On the lower back, 1.5 finger’s breadth lateral to the lower border of the spinous process of the second lumbar vertebra.Massage the point by thumb for 1-3 minutes.

Massage Therapy
For all Kidney related issues which effect the brain, bone, hair, teeth a/or hearing. Male deficiency related sexual problems: impotence, premature ejaculation, spermatorrhea, sterility, exhaustion following ejaculation.
Asthma – Bone Disorders – Deafness – Diarrhea – Dizziness – Edema – Ejaculation Premature – Emaciation – Hematuria – Impotence – Knee Disorders – Leukorrhea – Lumbar Pain – Menses Irregular – Nephritis – Nocturnal Emissions – Seminal Emissions – Tinnitus – Urinary Dysfunction – Urinary Incontinence – Visual

 

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Step 4…Xia Liao point
In the sacral region, in the fourth posterior sacral foramen.
Massage the point by thumb for 1-3 minutes.

Massage Therapy
Regulates The Lower Burner ,Regulates Menstruation ,Strengthens The Lumbar Region And Legs ,Regulates Urination And Defecation Stops Leucorrhea
Abdominal Pain – Constipation – Dysuria – Labor Difficult – Leukorrhea – Lumbar Pain – Lumbosacral Joint Diseases – Menses Irregular – Orchitis – Sacral Pain – Sciatica – Uterine Prolapse

 

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Step-5…Guan Yuan point
In the pubic region, on the anterior midline, 2 finger’s breadth superior to the upper border of the symphysis pubis.Massage it by thumb for 1-3 minutes.

Massage Therapy
Abdominal Pain – Amenorrhea – Diarrhea – Dysmenorrhea – Dysuria – Hematuria – Hemorrhage Postpartum – Hernia – Hypogastric Pain Twisting – Impotence – Infertility – Intestinal Disorders – Leukorrhea – Menses Irregular – Menses Painful – Nocturnal Emissions – Seminal Emissions – Stool With Blood – Urinary Dysfunction – Urination Frequent – Urine Retention – Uterine Bleeding Abnormal – Uterine Prolapse – Windstroke Skin Disorders – Stomach Pain – Vomiting

 

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Step-6…Xue Hai point
On the medial thigh, with the knee in flexion, 2 finger’s breadth superior to the superomedial angle of the patella, on vastus medialis muscle.
Massage it by thumb for 1-3 minutes.

Massage Therapy
Any Gynecological issues originating from Blood, Heat, Stasis a/or Deficiency – irregular menstruation, cramping.
Amenorrhea – Dysmenorrhea – Eczema – Menses Irregular – Skin Disorders – Thigh Medial Pain – Urinary Dysfunction – Urticaria – Uterine Bleeding Abnormal

 

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Sources:http://www.massagetherapy-schools.net/massage-therapy-women-dysmenorrhea.htm

Healing Our Bodies

Touch
Sometimes we might concentrate so much on our spiritual lives that we overlook the wonders of being present in our physical form. When we are more aware of the fact that our bodies are also important in terms of our personal growth, we may find it easier to nurture them. One of the most powerful ways to do this is through human touch, for a loving, comforting touch allows us to access the part of ourselves that yearns for a sense of oneness with the world around us. Even simple forms of touch connect us not just to our bodies but also to the energetic presence of other people.

There are so many ways to incorporate touch in our daily lives, one of the easiest being a heartfelt embrace. Just making a point to hug someone on a daily basis and really feel our energy pass between each other can strengthen the bonds that keep us together. Hugs help us heal any hurt or upset we may have recently experienced by letting us release into the moment of the embrace and realize that no matter what happens to us, we have someone in our lives who supports and cares for us.

Another nourishing form of touch is massage. While we may think of massage as a luxury, it is actually an ancient form of healing that enables us to open up our energetic pathways in order to receive unlimited energy from the universe. It doesn’t matter whether a simple massage comes from a loved one or a massage therapist, but by giving ourselves the gift of massage every once in a while, we are doing something healthy and beneficial for our bodies. Massage helps our bodies activate their own restorative powers, creating a wonderful way to engage fully in our own healing.

Letting ourselves take advantage of the healing nature of touch creates space where we can truly live in and experience the world through our bodies, allowing us to completely immerse ourselves in the loving sense of joy and wonder that is our life.

Sources: Daily Om