Categories
Herbs & Plants

Pausinystalia johimbe

[amazon_link asins=’6131589550,B007KWKG6E,B0011TRO1W,B008M6UQEY,B01BIEAVF0,B00KLGMJV6,B001E8FJ9O,B01BKRWMFC’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’4c449f0c-0480-11e7-9dff-9b2b32ac011c’]

Botanical Name :Pausinystalia johimbe
Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Pausinystalia
Species: P. yohimbe
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms: Coryanthe yohimbe

Common Names:Yohimbe , johimbe, yumbina

Habitat :Pausinystalia johimbe is native to Africa specifically  west Africa.

Description:
Pausinystalia johimbe is an evergreen tree grows to a height of 30m, having fissured bark grey brown in colour and often spoted with lichen.The interior sides of the fissures are typically redder than the outer bark. The erect stems branch heavely with ovate or elliptical leaves roughly 10cm in length.The wiged seeds are delicate and paper thin.

Click to see the pictures…>…..(01).....(1).……..(2).

Chemical Constituents:Ajmaline, corynantheine, corynanthene, quebrachin, tannins, yohimbine

In addition to yohimbine, Yohimbe also contains 55 other alkaloids. Yohimbine accounts for 1-20% of its total alkaloid content. Among the others is corynanthine, an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor blocker. Hence, the use of yohimbe extract in sufficient dosages may provide concomitant alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors blockade and thus may better enhance erections than yohimbine alone.

Medicinal Uses:
The bark of this West African tree may be used as best natural bet for reversing sexual dysfunction, though at the cost of several side effects. Until the advent of Viagra, the most commonly prescribed drug for erection problems was a pharmaceutical isolation of yohimbe’s’ active phytochemical, yohimbine. Called “herbal viagra” by the February 1999 edition of Environmental Nutrition, yohimbe’s power comes from a combination of alkaloids. Alkaloids are organic plant substances that have strong medicinal properties and are frequently used as drugs.

The terms yohimbine, yohimbine hydrochloride, and yohimbe bark extract are related but different. Yohimbe refers to the herb. Yohimbine refers to the active chemical found not only in yohimbe but also in Indian snakewood, periwinkle, quebracho, and niando. For a significant number of men who try it, yohimbe lives up to its reputation as a sexual performance enhancer.

While Yohimbe herb is often thought of for male erectile dysfunction support, most people don’t realize that yohimbe is also effective in women. This herb increases blood flow to the genitals of both males and females giving women an enhanced sensation and engorgement of genital organs. However, keep the dose low to prevent the yohimbe side effects.

Yohimbe is also sold as a muscle building natural version of anabolic steroids. However, it’s action is apparently unrelated to the body’s production of testosterone, which means it probably is of little value in building bigger muscles.

The only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medicine for impotence is yohimbine – an alkaloid isolated from the bark of the yohimbe tree (Pausinystalia yohimbe) native to tropical West Africa. Yohimbine hydrochloride increases libido, but its primary action is to increase blood flow to erectile tissue. Contrary to a popular misconception, yohimbine has no effects on testosterone levels.  When used alone, yohimbine is successful in 34-43 percent of cases.

Side Effects::
Not recommended if one has severe kidney or liver disease. Not to be taken if any one is currently on blood thinning medication, and it is not recommended to be taken for extended periods of time. Side effects can include anxiety, dizziness, rapid heart rate, insomnia, and nausea. Extremely high doses can cause hallucinations and cause muscular dysfunction – do not exceed recommend dosage by doctor. The herb contains compounds capable of elevating and also lowering blood pressure to a possibly dangerous level.

A recent study examined recreational erectile dysfunction medication use among young men. Since its introduction to the consumer market in 1998, Viagra and other oral erectile dysfunction medications (EDMs), with their promise of four-hour long erections, have become an increasingly popular drug of abuse. Viagra and other oral EDMs are unfortunately associated with increased sexual risk behaviors in young men, yet they may also negatively impact sexual function. By affecting confidence, a healthy young man may lose belief in his ability to attain an erection without pharmacological aid.

The researchers worked with a sample population comprised of 1,207 sexually active men recruited from undergraduate institutions within the U.S. Participants completed an online survey assessing frequency of EDM use, as well as levels of sexual function and levels of confidence in ability to gain and maintain erection. Recreational users reported lower erectile confidence and lower overall satisfaction compared with nonusers. Researchers believe their results underscore the possibility that recreational use of EDMs among healthy young men may lead to dysfunction.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pausinystalia_yohimbe
http://www.globinmed.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=83409:pausinystal/
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail295.php

http://www.medicaldaily.com/discover-male-enhancement-through-4-natural-libido-boosters-246699

.http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies Pediatric

Hypospadias

Definition:
Hypospadias is a birth defect found in boys in which the penile meatus is not at the tip of the penis. The meatus is the term for the opening of the penis through which urine normally exits the bladder. The incidence is reported to be 1 in 300 live male births. There is some family risk of hypospadias, as familial tendencies have been noted. Up to 14% of male siblings are affected.

Hypospadias is usually classified according to the location of the opening. As the defect increases in severity, the opening to the penis will be found further back on the penis. The most severe types can have openings at the region of the scrotum and even in the perineum (the region between the anus and scrotum).

Click for picture

In some men with hypospadias, there’s another abnormality called chordee, in which the penis curves downwards and the foreskin only covers the front of it.In the most severe forms of hypospadias, the urethral opening is so far back it’s almost in the scrotum. The scrotum itself may be small and the testes may not have descended (that is, they’re still deep in the abdomen). When babies are born like this, it can be difficult to work out which sex they are without further tests.

click tom see the picture

Both hypospadias and chordee must be repaired so that a child can have normal urinary and reproductive health.

Symptoms:
Hypospadias is a structural abnormality that doesn’t progress or put the man at risk of any other serious illness. However, as with any abnormalities of the urinary system, there may be an increased risk of urinary infection in more severe cases.

Hypospadias may cause emotional turmoil when a boy realises he’s different from his friends. It can also cause practical problems with passing urine (those with the condition usually have to sit down to pee) and later with sexual intercourse, which may be embarrassing or difficult to cope with. Hypospadias may cause general worries about sexuality and fertility.

Signs and symptoms of hypospadias may include:

*Opening of the urethra at a location other than the tip of the penis
*Downward curve of the penis (chordee)
*Hooded appearance of the penis because only the top half of the penis is covered by foreskin
*Abnormal spraying during urination

Causes:
Hypospadias is present at birth (congenital). The exact reason this defect occurs is unknown. Sometimes hypospadias is inherited.

As the penis develops in a male fetus, certain hormones stimulate the formation of the urethra and foreskin. Hypospadias results when a malfunction occurs in the action of these hormones, causing the urethra to develop abnormally.

As a boy is developing in utero, the penis begins to form in the sixth week of fetal life. Two folds of tissue join each other in the middle and a hollow tube is formed in the middle of the future penis. This tube is the urethra and its opening is called the penile meatus. As the skin folds develop to form the penis, any interruption in this process leads to the meatus being located in a location further from the end of the penis. The exact etiology for this premature cessation of urethral formation is poorly understood. In addition, the etiology of the often-associated abnormal downward curvature (chordee) is also poorly understood.

Risk Factors:
This condition is more common in infants with a family history of hypospadias.

Some research suggests that there may be an increased risk of hypospadias in infant males born to women of an advanced age or those who used in vitro fertilization (IVF) to conceive. The connection to IVF may be due to the mother’s exposure to progesterone, a natural hormone, or to progestin, a synthetic form of progesterone, administered during the IVF process. Other research, however, hasn’t confirmed a link between IVF and hypospadias, but did find an association between a mother’s exposure to pesticides and hypospadias.

Diagnosis:
A physical examination can diagnose this condition. Imaging tests may be needed to look for other congenital defects.

Treatment
The treatment of hypospadias is always surgical. Initially when the child is born and hypospadias is identified, it is important to delay any thoughts of circumcision until seen by a urologist. This is because the foreskin can provide essential additional skin needed to reconstruct the urethra.

Hypospadias is often repaired  before a child is one year of age. This way, the boy is in diapers and management of dressings are made easier. However, the exact age of repair can vary according to the size of the penis and severity of the defect. It can be repaired in most of the  cases with a single operation, but on occasion, a second operation may be needed. The operation is performed under general anesthesia with the child completely asleep. Most of the boys will have a small tube exiting the tip of their new meatus. This “stent” will protect the new urethra and allow for adequate healing. Most patients leave the hospital the same day or the following day. However, more complex repairs for the more severe types of hypospadias can require longer hospital stays due to the need for bedrest and immobilization in the immediate post-operative setting.


Click for the picture

The exact type of operation employed varies according to the severity of the defect. For the more distal defects that have openings closer to the normal position at the end of the penis, a new tube can be created from the surrounding skin. This creation of a tube is known as a Thiersch-Duplay repair. For more severe defects, the options range. Additional hairless skin is often needed to recreate the urethral tube when longer defects are seen. Here, the subdermal skin of the foreskin can be used. For the most severe defects, we can remove mucosal skin from the inside of the cheek or use subdermal skin from other hairless parts of the body. It is important to use hairless skin as future hair growth in the neourethra can present multiple problems.

Complications:
The usual risks of surgery are present at the time of performing  hypospadias repairs. Risk of infection is controlled with use of antibiotics with the surgery and in the post-operative setting. Bleeding is well controlled by using a penile tourniquet during the operation. This limits the blood loss to a very minimal amount, while allowing for good visualization of the tissues for the surgeon.

By using good surgical techniques   the longer-term complications of the surgery are minimised. The most common problems that present are fistula and stricture. A fistula occurs if a hole develops along the pathway of the repair proximal to the tip of the penis. In other words, a hole can develop along the underside of the penis allowing for leakage of urine. Additionally, a stricture is a scar that can form causing a narrowing in the urethra. If either of these complications occur, an additional repair will be needed usually 6 months later

Prognosis:
Results after surgery are typically good. In some cases, more surgery is needed to correct fistulas or a return of the abnormal penis curve.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/hypospadias.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001286.htm
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypospadias/DS00884
http://www.cornellurology.com/pediatrics/hypospadias.shtml

http://www.medindia.net/patients/paediatrics/Hypospadias.htm

http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/Fi-La/Hypospadias-Repair.html

http://www.adhb.govt.nz/newborn/Guidelines/Anomalies/Hypospadias.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Tribulus (Gokshura)

 

Botanical Name:Tribulus/ Tribulus terrestris/Pedalium Murex (LINN.)
Family: Zygophyllaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Zygophyllales
Genus: Tribulus
Common Names: Puncture Vine, Caltrop, Yellow Vine, Burra Gookeroo and Goathead are the most widely used.

Other common names: Tribulus, Gokshura, Goathead, Tribulus Terrestris, Burra Gookeroo, Burra Gokhru, Caltrop, Yellow Vine
Habitat: Native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World in southern Europe, southern Asia, throughout Africa, and in northern Australia. It can thrive even in desert climates and poor soil.

Description:
It is a taprooted herbaceous perennial plant that grows as a summer annual in colder climates. The stems radiate from the crown to a diameter of about 10 cm to over 1 m, often branching. They are usually prostrate, forming flat patches, though they may grow more upwards in shade or among taller plants. The leaves are pinnately compound with leaflets less than a quarter-inch long. The flowers are 4–10 mm wide, with five lemon-yellow petals. A week after each flower blooms, it is followed by a fruit that easily falls apart into four or five single-seeded nutlets. The nutlets or “seeds” are hard and bear two to three sharp spines, 10 mm long and 4–6 mm broad point-to-point. These nutlets strikingly resemble goats’ or bulls’ heads; the “horns” are sharp enough to puncture bicycle tires and to cause painful injury to bare feet.
click to see the pictures……>...(01)......(1)……...(2)……...(3)...
Tribulus species are perennial, but some grow as annuals in colder climates. The leaves are opposite and compound. The flowers are perfect (hermaphroditic) and insect-pollinated, with fivefold symmetry. The ovary is divided into locules that are in turn divided by “false septa” (the latter distinguish Tribulus from other members of its family).

Some species are cultivated as ornamental plants in warm regions. Some, notably T. cistoides, T. longipetalus, T. micrococcus, T. terrestris, and T. zeyheri, are considered weeds.

The Latin name tribulus originally meant the caltrop (a spiky weapon), but in Classical times already meant this plant as well

Cultivition:
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

The plant is widely naturalised in the Americas and also in Australia south of its native range. In some states in the United States, it is considered a noxious weed and an invasive species.

It has been reported that puncture vine seeds have been used in homicidal weapons in southern Africa; murderers smear them with the poisonous juice of Acokanthera venenata and put them where victims are likely to step.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out after the last expected frost.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Fruit; Leaves.
Leaves and young shoots – cooked. A nutritional analysis is available. Fruit – cooked. The unexpanded seed capsules are ground into a powder and made into a bread. A famine food, it is only used when all else fails.

Composition:
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.

*Leaves (Fresh weight)

*0 Calories per 100g

*Water: 79.09%

*Protein: 7.22g; Fat: 0g; Carbohydrate: 0g; Fibre: 0g; Ash: 4.6g;

*Minerals – Calcium: 1600mg; Phosphorus: 80mg; Iron: 9.22mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;

*Vitamins – A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 41mg;


Medicinal Uses:

Abortifacient; Alterative; Anthelmintic; Aphrodisiac; Carminative; Demulcent; Diuretic; Galactogogue; Infertility; Pectoral.

The seed is abortifacient, alterative, anthelmintic, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, demulcent, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, pectoral and tonic. It stimulates blood circulation. A decoction is used in treating impotency in males, nocturnal emissions, gonorrhoea and incontinence of urine. It has also proved effective in treating painful urination, gout and kidney diseases. The plant has shown anticancer activity. The flowers are used in the treatment of leprosy. The stems are used in the treatment of scabious skin diseases and psoriasis. The dried and concocted fruits are used in the treatment of congestion, gas, headache, liver, ophthalmia and stomatitis.

Tribulus has been shown to enhance sexual behaviour in an animal model. It appears to do so by stimulating androgen receptors in the brain.

Some body builders use T. terrestris as post cycle therapy or “PCT“. After they’ve completed an anabolic-steroid cycle, they use it under the assumption that it will restore the body’s natural testosterone levels.

Tribulus has a long history of use in the Ayurvedic and Unani systems of India. It is considered an aphrodisiac, diuretic, and nervine.

Tribulus, a traditional Ayurvedic herb commonly known as the puncture vine, has been used for centuries in Europe as a treatment for impotence and as a stimulant to help enhance sexual drive and performance. Tribulus has been shown to increase LH (luteinizing hormone) production and boost testosterone levels. Tribulus exerts its testosterone-elevating effects by stimulating an increase in LH, which is responsible for telling your body to produce testosterone. Testosterone is a vital hormone responsible for the development of secondary sexual traits, as well as increasing muscle size and strength. As a result, Tribulus as also been shown to increase energy and stamina, and to speed up muscle recovery after muscle fibers have been broken down as a result of exercise.

*Boost natural testosterone production

*Gain lean muscle whilst reducing body fat

*Pro-anabolic formula for increased athletic power

*Enhance vitality, sexual libido and feelings of youthfulness

*Improve sport performance through increased natural hormonal activity

As per Ayurveda:
It is sheetala, svadu, invigorating; useful in the treatment of urinary affection: madhura; gastric stimulant, aphrodisiac; nutritive; used in the treatment of urinary ca1culii, polyuria, dyspnoea, cough, piles, dysuria, heart disease; pacifies deranged vata.

Parts Used: Fruits, leaves, stem and root.

Therapeutic Uses:
Fruits (dried) : aphrodisiac, demulcent, diuretic and tonic; decoction/infusion efficacious in chronic cystitis, gonorrhoea, gout, gravel. impotence, kidney diseases and painful micturition; one of the ten ingredients of Dashamula;


leaves:
in affections of urinary calculii, stomachic; stem: astringent, infusion useful in gonorrhoea; root: aperient, demulcent and tonic; an ingredient of Dashamula kwatha, a well-known Ayurvedic preparation for urinary troubles and impotence.

The root and fruit are sweetish; cooling; tonic, fattening, aphrodisiac, alterative; improve appetite; useful in strangury, urinary discharges, vesicular calculi, pruritus ani; alleviate burning sensation; reduce inflammation; remove .. tridosha,” cough, asthma, pain; cure, skin and heart diseases, piles, leprosy.-

The leaves are aphrodisiac and purify the bIood.-

The seeds are cooling, fattening, diuretic aphrodisiac; remove inflammations, urinary troubles, stones in the bladder.-

The ashes are sweet ‘cooling, aphrodisiac; cure” vatapurify the blood

The fruit is sour with a bad taste; :diuretic; removes gravel from the urine and stone in the bladder; cures strangury, gleet.-

The leaves are diuretic; tonic; enrich the blood; increase the menstrual flow; cure gonorrhoea and gleet; a decoction is useful as a gargle for mouth troubles and painful gums; reduce inflammation.-

The root is a good stomachic and appetiser: emmenagogue, diuretic carminative; cures lumbago .

The fruits are regarded as cooling, diuretic, tonic and aphrodisiac, and are used in painful micturition, calculous affections, urinary, disorders and impotence.

An infusion” made from the fruit has been found very useful as a diuretic in gout, kidney disease and gravel;, also used largely as anaphrodisiac..

The fruit is reputed tonic and astringent. It is used for coughs, spermatorrhoea, scabies, anemia, ophthalmia; it is a powerful hemootatic, much used in postpartum haemorrhage and in dysenteries;as a gargle it is prescribed for ulcers of the gums, inflammation of the mouth, aphthae, and angina.

The entire plant, but more particularly the fruits, are used in medicine. They possess cooling, diuretic, tonic, and aphrodisiac properties and are used in dysuria, urinary disorders, calculus affections, and impotency. .

For more Knowledge you may click on:->……..(1)….(2).(3)

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tribulus
http://websites.uk-plc.net/247Weight/products/Tribulus.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Tribulus+terrestris

http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#eranda

 

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Prostatitis

Prostate with seminal vesicles and seminal duc...
Image via Wikipedia

Definition:
Prostatitis is inflammation or infection of the prostate gland — an organ about the size and shape of a walnut, located just below the bladder in males. The prostate gland produces semen, the fluid that helps nourish and transport sperm. Prostatitis can cause a variety of symptoms, including a frequent and urgent need to urinate and pain or burning when urinating — often accompanied by pelvic, groin or low back pain.

click to see the pictures..>….(01)...…(1).……...(2).……...(3)..…..…(4)…….…..

Prostatitis has been classified by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) into four categories.

Category I
Main article: Acute prostatitis
Acute prostatitis is a bacterial infection of the prostate gland that requires urgent medical treatment.

Category II
Main article: Chronic bacterial prostatitis
Chronic bacterial prostatitis is a relatively rare condition that usually presents as intermittent urinary tract infections.

Category III
Main article: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome
Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS), accounting for 90%-95% of prostatitis diagnoses, is also known as chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. The annual prevalence in the population of chronic pelvic pain syndrome is 0.5%. Men in this category have no known infection, but do have extensive pelvic pain lasting more than 3 months. There are no standard diagnostic tests; diagnosis is by exclusion of other disease entities. Multimodal therapy is the most successful treatment option, and includes ?-blockers, phytotherapy, and protocols aimed at quieting the pelvic nerves through myofascial trigger point release with psychological re-training for anxiety control. Antibiotics are not recommended.

Category IV
Main article: Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis
Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis patients have no history of genitourinary pain complaints, but leukocytosis is noted, usually during evaluation for other conditions. Between 6-19% of men have pus cells in their semen but no symptoms.

Pain relievers and several weeks of treatment with antibiotic are typically needed for category 1 and 2 prostatitis, which are bacterial infections. A variety of treatments as well as self-care measures also can provide relief. Treatment for category 3 prostatitis (nonbacterial) is less clear and mainly involves relieving symptoms. Category 4 prostatitis is usually found during examination for another reason and often doesn’t require treatment.

Symptoms
The signs and symptoms vary depending on the various types of prostatitis.

Acute bacterial prostatitis: Category 1
Signs and symptoms of this form of prostatitis usually come on suddenly and may include:

*Fever and chills

*Flu-like symptoms

*Pain in the prostate gland, lower back or groin

*Urinary problems, including increased urinary urgency and frequency, difficulty or pain when urinating, inability to completely empty the bladder, and blood-tinged urine

*Painful ejaculation

*Acute prostatitis can be a serious condition and requires immediate medical treatment. See your doctor right away if you develop any of these signs and symptoms.

Chronic bacterial prostatitis: Category 2
The signs and symptoms of this type of prostatitis develop more slowly and usually aren’t as severe as those of acute prostatitis. In addition, times when symptoms are better tend to alternate with times when symptoms are worse. Signs and symptoms of chronic bacterial prostatitis include:

*A frequent and urgent need to urinate

*Pain or a burning sensation when urinating (dysuria)

*Pain in the pelvic area

*Excessive urination during the night (nocturia)

*Pain in the lower back and genital area

*Difficulty starting to urinate, or diminished urine flow

*Occasional blood in semen or in urine (hematuria)

*Painful ejaculation

*A slight fever

*Recurring bladder infections

Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis: Category 3
The signs and symptoms of nonbacterial prostatitis are similar to those of chronic bacterial prostatitis, although you probably won’t have a fever. The only way to determine whether prostatitis symptoms are caused by bacterial infection or are nonbacterial is through lab tests to find out whether bacteria is present in the urine or prostate gland fluid.

Other conditions
Prostatitis can be difficult to diagnose, in part because its signs and symptoms often resemble those of other conditions, such as bladder infections, bladder cancer or prostate enlargement due to benign or cancerous growth of the prostate.

Causes:-
Acute bacterial prostatitis: Category 1
……..CLICK & SEE
Bacteria normally found in your large intestine typically cause acute prostatitis. Most commonly, acute prostatitis originates in the prostate, but occasionally the infection can spread from a bladder or urethral infection.

Chronic bacterial prostatitis: Category 2..…...CLICK & SEE
It’s not entirely clear what causes a chronic bacterial infection. Sometimes it develops after an episode of acute prostatitis when bacteria remain in the prostate. Catheter tubes used to drain the urinary bladder, injury to the urinary system (such as from bike riding or horseback riding ) or infections in other parts of the body can be the source of the bacteria.

Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis: Category 3…..…CLICK & SEE
The cause or causes of this condition are not well-defined. Some theories regarding the causes are as follows:

* Other infectious agents. Some experts believe nonbacterial prostatitis may be caused by an infectious agent or agents that do not show up in standard laboratory tests.

*Heavy lifting. Lifting heavy objects when your bladder is full may cause urine to back up into your prostate causing inflammation.

*Interstitial cystitis. This condition that’s more frequently diagnosed as a cause of chronic pelvic pain in women is being more frequently recognized in men.

*Physical activity. Although regular exercise, especially jogging or biking, is great for the rest of your body, it may irritate your prostate gland.

*Pelvic muscle spasm. Urinating in an uncoordinated fashion with the sphincter muscle not relaxed may lead to high pressure in the prostate and the development of inflammation and prostatitis symptoms.

*Structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. Narrowings (strictures) of your urethra may cause increased pressure during urination and result in inflammation and symptoms.
Prostatitis is not contagious and is not a sexually transmitted disease.

You may click to learn more about the causes of Prostatitis….(1).……(2).……(3)…….(4)

Risk factors:-

Risk factors for prostatitis include bladder outlet obstruction (e.g., stone, tumor, BPH), diabetes mellitus, a suppressed immune system, and urethral catheterization (i.e., small tube inserted into the bladder through the urethra to drain urine). Some sexually transmitted diseases (STDs; e.g., nongonnococcal urethritis, gonorrhea) increase the risk for developing bacterial prostatatis. Unprotected anal and vaginal intercourse can allow bacteria to enter the urethra and travel to the prostate.
Unlike other prostate problems, you’re more likely to develop prostatitis when you’re younger, even before age 40. You may also be at increased risk if you:

*Recently had a bladder infection or an infection of your urethra

*Recently had a urinary catheter inserted during a medical procedure

*Do not empty your bladder frequently enough and you perform vigorous activities with a full bladder

*Jog or bicycle on a regular basis or ride horses

*Men with HIV also are at increased risk of bacterial prostatitis. It’s not clear why.

Complications:-
There’s no evidence that having acute or chronic prostatitis increases your risk of prostate cancer, but it may increase the level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your bloodstream. PSA is a substance naturally produced in your prostate gland, and high levels in your blood may sometimes — but not always — be a sign of prostate cancer. For that reason, if you have an elevated PSA level and also have acute prostatitis, you should be rechecked after you’ve been treated with antibiotics and all prostate inflammation has resolved.

Because prostatitis interferes with the transport of sperm cells and may interfere with normal ejaculation, it can sometimes affect fertility. In addition, untreated acute prostatitis can lead to an inability to urinate, and in severe cases may result in bacteria in your bloodstream (bacteremia).

Diagnosis:-

Diagnosing prostatitis involves ruling out any other conditions that may be causing your signs and symptoms and then determining what kind of prostatitis you have.

Your doctor will likely begin by taking a medical history and performing a physical exam. You may be asked to complete a questionnaire about your symptoms. The physical exam may include checking your abdomen and pelvic area for tenderness and a digital rectal exam of your prostate.

Digital rectal exam
During a digital rectal exam, your doctor manually examines your prostate gland by gently inserting a lubricated, gloved finger into your rectum. Because the prostate gland is in front of the rectum, your doctor can feel the back surface of the gland this way. If it seems enlarged and tender to the touch, you may have prostatitis.

Urine and semen test
Your doctor may want to evaluate samples of your urine and semen for bacteria and white blood cells — key cells in your immune system’s response — to help establish a diagnosis of prostatitis.

Modern Treatments:-
The main treatment for bacterial prostatitis (category 1 and 2) is antibiotics to cure the infection. If you have acute prostatitis, you may need to be hospitalized for a few days to receive antibiotics intravenously. Some of these treatments may also be tried for chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. However, there’s no strong evidence that antibiotic therapy is useful for nonbacterial or category 3 prostatitis.

Medications
Antibiotics. Antibiotics are usually the first choice of treatment for category 1 and 2 prostatitis. Your doctor will likely begin right away with an antibiotic that fights a broad spectrum of bacteria. He or she will also proceed with testing to determine the exact bacteria causing your infection. Once the exact bacterium is identified, your doctor can prescribe a specific antibiotic that is more likely to kill the particular bacteria present.

*How long you take antibiotics depends on how well you respond to the drug. If you have category 1 prostatitis, you may need medication for a few weeks. Category 2 prostatitis is more resistant to antibiotics and takes longer to treat. You may need to continue taking medication for as long as six to 12 weeks. In some cases the infection may never be eliminated, and you could have a relapse as soon as the drug is withdrawn. If this happens, you may need to take a low-dose antibiotic indefinitely.

*Some doctors may prescribe an antibiotic for category 3 prostatitis to see if symptoms improve. For unknown reasons, some men with this condition seem to benefit from a continuous low dose of an antibiotic.
Alpha blockers. If you’re having difficulty urinating, your doctor may prescribe an alpha blocker — an oral medication that helps relax the bladder neck and the muscle fibers where your prostate joins your bladder. This may help you urinate more easily and empty your bladder more completely.

Pain relievers. Sometimes an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others), can make you more comfortable. Keep in mind, however, that taking too much of any of these medications can cause serious side effects including abdominal pain, intestinal bleeding or ulcers.

Muscle relaxants. Spasms of the pelvic muscles can accompany prostatitis. A combination of a muscle relaxant medication and other medications used to treat prostatitis may be helpful.

Physical therapy
Special exercises and relaxation techniques can improve symptoms of prostatitis in some men, perhaps because tight or irritated muscles can contribute to the condition. Common techniques include:

Exercise. Stretching and relaxing the lower pelvic muscles — sometimes with the addition of heat to make the muscles more limber — may help relieve your symptoms. A physical therapist can show you which exercises will benefit you the most and how to perform them. You can then do the exercises yourself at home.
Biofeedback. This technique teaches you how to control certain body responses, including relaxing your muscles. During a biofeedback session, a trained therapist applies electrodes and other sensors to various parts of your body. The electrodes are attached to a monitor that displays your heart rate, blood pressure and degree of muscle tension. You’ll see changes on the monitor and learn to control these changes on your own.
Sitz baths. Named from the German word “sitzen,” which means “to sit,” this type of bath simply involves soaking the lower half of your body in a tub of warm water. Warm baths can relieve pain and relax the lower abdominal muscles. Few treatments are easier or as relaxing.
Prostate massage. Some men have found that having their prostate massaged helps relieve congestion by unplugging the small ducts blocked by inflammation. The massage is performed using a gloved finger, similar to what is done during a digital rectal exam. This procedure is used less commonly today than it once was.
Surgical procedures
Surgical removal of the infected part of the prostate is an option in a few severe cases when other treatments don’t work. The chances of responding to a major surgical procedure for any type of prostatitis are quite low. For this reason most doctors are very hesitant to perform surgery for these conditions and generally discourage surgery even as a last resort.

Other treatments:-
Finasteride (Proscar), a drug that lowers hormone levels in the prostate, and microwave thermotherapy (heat therapy) have been used successfully in a few men with prostatitis, but there’s little long-term experience with these treatments.

Lifestyle and home remedies:-
Because traditional treatments aren’t always effective for prostatitis, many men experiment with various lifestyle changes to control their symptoms. Although no scientific evidence proves these practices are beneficial, you may want to try one or more of the following suggestions:

*Drink plenty of water.

*Limit or avoid alcohol, caffeine and spicy foods.

*Urinate at regular intervals.

*Have regular sexual activity.

*If you’re a cyclist, use a “split” bicycle seat, which reduces the pressure on your prostate.

Men with category 3 prostatitis can learn to live with the disease by limiting the things that make their symptoms worse and emphasizing the things that make them feel better.

Alternative medicine:-
Although how they work is poorly understood, some natural remedies — including saw palmetto preparations, zinc supplements and quercetin — have helped some men manage the symptoms of prostatitis.

Herbal Madication:-
THE HERBS listed below can help you overcome benign enlargement of the prostate – chronic or acute – with symptoms that include pain, frequent urination with or without a burning sensation, blood or pus in the urine, lower back pain, impotence, kidney damage, stubborn or recurring bladder infections

African pygeum, saw palmetto berries, dandelion root, slippery elm bark, marshmallow root, cat’s claw concentrate, san qi, coral calcium with trace minerals.

You may click for Homeopathic medication for Prostatitis………(1)…..(2)...(3)...(4)

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/prostatitis/DS00341
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostatitis
http://www.urologychannel.com/prostate/prostatitis/riskfactors.shtml
http://www.herbnews.org/prostatitisdone.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
News on Health & Science

Prostrate Cancer – Myths And Facts

[amazon_link asins=’1455504181,0988710501,0670021644,1451577877,1450090621,1137278749,1587613581,075351298X,1555613187′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’35b06906-ffd1-11e6-968b-71a270d78461′]

[amazon_link asins=’B01MSIJDBG,B01N90XVTK,B015OTDXMS,B01D0JZRKU’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’67ee0a7b-ffd1-11e6-a323-4bef48e5e670′]

Your prostate is “the size and shape of a walnut”
Misleading, though constantly trotted out by charities. Actually, an apricot is a far better analogy for this organ that sits in the pelvis below the bladder. Like fruits, the prostate has an indentation at the top, through which passes the tube carrying urine from the bladder. That’s why an enlarged prostate means problems peeing.

Hardly. All that most people know about the prostate is that it gets cancer. We chaps should rejoice in it a little more. Not only does it produce the fluids that carry and nourish our sperm; not only is it a complex chemical factory; it’s also the male G-spot and produces many of our sexual kicks.

Men who get prostate cancer are the unlucky minority:
Fiction. It’s not often said because it sounds frightening, but getting prostate cancer could be said to be the norm rather than the exception as men get older. Over the past 30 years prostate cancer rates in Britain have tripled, but this is because of increased detection through PSA tests and the fact that we are living longer. Knowing that you have prostate cancer in your fifties is certainly bad, but for a man aged 85 it’s largely a reflection of the fact that he has been lucky enough not to die of something else earlier. Of the millions of middle-aged men who are never tested, research suggests that a third may have sluggish, relatively harmless prostate cancer and most will never know it.

You cannot reduce your risk of prostate cancer:

Hogwash. Though it’s your genes, your ethnic background and age that are the main risk factors, eating healthily seems to have a preventive role. The Prostate Cancer Charity says that cutting down on animal fat and eating more fruit and veg may lower your chances of prostate cancer. Recent research has indicated that broccoli, in particular, protects because it changes the way our genes express themselves. The jury remains out on supplements based on extracts of tomato, pomegranate and red clover.

Masturbation prevents prostate cancer:
Probably true, according to credible recent research, which found that men who ejaculated more than five times a week (solo, or with a partner) between the ages of 20 and 50 were a third less likely to develop prostate cancer later in life – probably because their orgasms were flushing out cancer-causing chemicals in their prostate. Sex with a partner, however, may pose a small risk of infection transmission, which could cancel the benefits

Sources:Times On Line

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]