Tag Archives: Midwestern United States

Elaeagnus commutata

Botanical Name : Elaeagnus commutata
Family: Elaeagnaceae
Genus: Elaeagnus
Species: E. commutata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Names:American silverberry or Wolf-willow,Silverberry

Habitat : Elaeagnus commutata is  native to western and boreal North America, from southern Alaska through British Columbia east to Quebec, south to Utah, and across the upper Midwestern United States to South Dakota and western Minnesota. It typically grows on dry to moist sandy and gravel soils in steppes, meadows or woodland edges.

Description:
These plants are shrubs or small trees growing to 1–4 m tall. The leaves are broad lanceolate, 2–7 cm long, silvery on both sides with dense small white scales. The fragrant flowers are yellow, with a four-lobed corolla 6–14 mm long. The fruits are ovoid drupes 9–12 mm long, also covered in silvery scales. The fruit pulp is floury in texture, and surrounds the single seed………CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Medicinal Uses:
A strong decoction of the bark, mixed with oil, has been used as a salve for children with frostbite. A decoction of the roots, combined with sumac roots (Rhus spp.), has been used in the treatment of syphilis. This medicine was considered to be very poisonous and, if you survived it, you were likely to become sterile. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaeagnus_commutata
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

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Few Warning Signs of Kid’s Immunodeficiency

Most PARENTS are no strangers to infections. Just about every child has had their share of colds and coughs and infected cuts or the flu. Some youngsters have had first-hand experience with infections that are even more serious   pneumonia and meningitis.

Usually, we expect our kids to quickly recover from an infection. We count on our body’s immune defenses (sometimes with the help of antibiotics) to get rid of any germs that cause infection, and to protect our kids against new germs in the future.

Some children, however, are born with an immune defense system that is faulty. They are missing some or, in the worst cases, almost all of the body’s immune defense weapons. Such youngsters are said to have a primary immunodeficiency (PI).

There are over 70 different types of PIs. Each type has some what different symptoms, depending on which parts of the immune defense system are deficient. Some deficiencies are deadly, while some are mild. But they all have one thing in common: they may open the door to multiple infections.

If your child is affected by more than one of the following conditions, speak to their doctor about the possible presence of Primary immunodeficiency.

Eight or more new ear
infections within 1 Year……………..
Recurrent, deep skin or organ abscesses

Two or more serious sinsus
infections within 1 year………………
Persistent thrush in the mouth or elsewhere on skin after age 1.

Two or more months on
antibiotics with little effect…………
Need for intravenous antibiotics to clear infections

Two or more pneumonias
within one year………………………
Two or more deep- seated infections in one year

Failure of an infant to gain
weight or grow normally………….
A family history of Primary Immunodeficiency

Source:  Kid’sGrowth.com