Tag Archives: Mongolia

Pulsatilla nuttalliana

Botanical Name :Pulsatilla nuttalliana
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Pulsatilla
Species: P. patens
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ranunculales

Syn.:  Anemone patens v.nuttalliana,

Common Name :Pasque Flower , Pasque Flower, Prairie Crocus, Eastern pasqueflower, prairie smoke, prairie crocus, and cutleaf anemone

Habitat:Pulsatilla nuttalliana is native to Europe, Russia, Mongolia, China, Canada and the United States.

Description:
Pulsatilla patens is a species Perennial Wildf flowering plant.The common name ‘Pasque Flower’ was given for its early blooming habits coinciding with Easter
Flowers/Fruit/Seeds:Light purplish flowers bloom in April before the appearance of the true leaves. Flowers give way to feathery seed heads which are quite showy.Leaves/Stem are erect, hairy stem grows to height of 4 to 10 inches, leaves divided, greyish green and lacy with smooth tops and hairy undersides.
Flowering Season:Spring

 

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Two subspecies have been distinguished:
Pulsatilla patens subsp. patens
Pulsatilla patens subsp. multifida (Pritz.) Zämelis — cutleaf anemone

Medicinal Uses:
Properties: * Antibacterial * Antispasmodic * Nervine

Pasque flower was listed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia at the time Millspaugh published his “American Medical Plants” in 1882, and was prescribed by both Eclectic physicians and homeopaths1 but is not widely used today because of its high toxicity. The plant can be an effective nervine in the hands of a trained herbalist for nervous exhaustion and dysmenorrhoea.

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Other Uses: We all can enjoy the early spring blooms of pasque flower in our garden as a harbinger of spring.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail552.php
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulsatilla_patens

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Cnidium

Botanical Name ; Cnidium monnieri
Family  : Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
Genus:    Cnidium
Species:C. monnieri
Kingdom:Plantae
Order:    Apiale

Common Name : Cnidium

Habitat :Cnidium  is native to   E. Asia – China, Korea, Mongolia, Russia. Previously naturalized in the warmer areas of Europe . Grows in field edges and the sides of ditches in China. Riparian meadows and field margins in most of China.

Description:
Cnidium monnieri is a perennial plant  growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It is in flower from May to July, and the seeds ripen from Jul to August.cnidium is round, dark yellow in color, and has a pleasant aroma….

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation: 
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. Judging by the plants native habitat it is likely to require a well-drained soil in a sunny position. One report says that it is an annual whilst another says that it is perennial.

Propagation:
Seed – we have no details for this species but suggest sowing it as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Alternatively, sow stored seed in late winter in a cold frame. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer

Edible Uses   :
Edible Parts: Leaves.
Edible Uses: Condiment.

The leaves are used as a condiment. Young shoots. No further details are given, but some caution is suggested because of a report of slight toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
Antipruritic;  Antirheumatic;  Aphrodisiac;  AstringentCarminative;  Sedative;  Vermifuge;  Vulnerary.

She Chuang Zi has been used for thousands of years in Chinese herbal medicine. It is mainly used externally as a lotion, powder or ointment for skin conditions such as eczema, ringworm and scabies. The seed is antipruritic, aphrodisiac, antirheumatic, astringent, carminative, discutient, sedative, vermifuge and vulnerary. A decoction is used internally in the treatment of Trichomonas vaginitis, leucorrhoea and uterine displacement. The seed is also used in the treatment of impotence, often in conjunction with Schisandra chinensis. It has been shown to have an action similar to the sex hormones, prolonging and reviving the copulation period, increasing the weight of the uterus and ovary, prostate gland and testicle. A decoction of the seed or whole plant is applied externally to skin problems including weeping eczema.

Safety: American Herbal Products Association has given cnidium a class I rating, meaning that it is safe when taken in appropriate levels. However, cnidium seeds should not be used for hot or sore skin that is excessively dry. They should not also be taken at the same time patients are taking peony root, croton seed or fritillaria.

Supporting Research: Cnidium has been very commonly used in formulations designed to warm the Kidneys and strengthen Yang energy. It is primarily used for the purpose of overcoming sexual malaise and strengthening sexual potency

Known Hazards :  One report says that the plant is slightly toxic.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cnidium+monnieri
http://www.herbpalace.com/herbs/cnidium-seed.html
http://saludbio.com/imagen/cnidium-monnieri

http://www.botanic-art.com/seeds-cnidium-monnieri-chuang-gram-p-340.html

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Scutellaria baicalensis

Botanical Name :Scutellaria baicalensis
Family: Lamiaceae/Labiatae
Genus: Scutellaria
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Species: S. baicalensis
Synonyms : S. macrantha. Fisch.
Common Name : Baikal Skullcap,  Scutellaria lateriflora,  Skullcap

Etymology confusion:
It is important to note the Latin name of the Skullcap being used as there are over 200 varieties, some used for various ailments, each with varying degrees of effectiveness. Sometimes Scutellaria lateriflora (North American Skullcap) is mistaken for Scutellaria baicalensis (Baikal Skullcap). This confusion can result in the intake of the lateriflora variety which is often processed and contaminated with other plants with high enough levels of toxicity to be of concern.

Habitat :Native to North America.Grows in E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia. Sandy and rocky places near the sea shore. Sunny, grassy slopes and waste ground from 100 – 2,000 metres above sea level.

Description:
Scutellaria baicalensis is a perennial herb ,growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in). It is a  species of flowering plant.
It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower in August, and the seeds ripen in September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

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The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in a sunny position in any ordinary garden soil that does not dry out during the growing season. Prefers a light well-drained soil in sun or partial shade. This species requires sharp drainage and, once established, is drought tolerant. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c. A very ornamental plant.

Propagation :
Seed – sow outdoors in situ in late spring If there is only a small quantity of seed it is better to sow it in a pot in a cold frame in early spring. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring just before new growth begins. Very easy, larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Young leaves – cooked as a vegetable. The whole plant is dried and used as a tea substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
Anodyne;  Antibacterial;  Anticholesterolemic;  Antipyretic;  Antispasmodic;  Astringent;  Cholagogue;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  FebrifugeHaemostatic;
Laxative;  Nervine;  Sedative;  Stomachic;  TB;  Tonic.

Baikal skullcap is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs and is used primarily in treating “hot and damp” conditions such as dysentery and diarrhoea. It has been used medicinally for over 2,000 years and recent research has found that the roots contain flavonoids that greatly enhance liver function and also have anti-inflammatory and antiallergenic effects. The root is anodyne, antibacterial, anticholesterolemic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, astringent, cholagogue, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, haemostatic, laxative, nervine, mildly sedative, stomachic and tonic (for TB). It reputedly calms the foetus in pregnant women. The root is used internally in the treatment of enteritis, dysentery, diarrhoea, jaundice, chronic hepatitis, urinary tract infections, hypertension, threatened miscarriage, nosebleed and haemorrhage from the lungs or bowel. It is one of the ingredients of the Chinese drug ‘injection of three yellow herbs’. The root is harvested in the autumn or spring from plants 3 – 4 years old and is dried for later use. The seed is used to cleanse the bowels of blood and pus.

Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi contains wogonin, a flavone which was found in one study to have anxiolytic properties in mice at doses of 7.5 to 30 mg/kg, without exhibiting the sedative and muscle-relaxing properties of benzodiazepines.

It also contains baicalin, another flavone.

You may click to see :
Anticancer Activity of Scutellaria baicalensis and Its Potential Mechanism :
What Are the Medical Uses of Scutellaria Baicalensis?

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Scutellaria+baicalensis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutellaria_baicalensis
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/potd/2007/12/scutellaria_baicalensis_1.php

Aconitum Volubile

Botanical Name: Aconitum volubile
Family:
Ranunculaceae
Tribe:
Delphinieae
Genus:
Aconitum
Kingdom:
Plantae
Order:
Ranunculales

Habitat : E. Asia – W. China, Korea, Mongolia.  Thickets in the sub-alpine zone to 4000 metres.

Description:
Perennial Climber growing to 2m by 1m.
It is hardy to zone 2. It is in flower from August to October. The flowers are pollinated by Bees.

Click to see the picture

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees, climbing through dwarf shrubs. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. There is some confusion over the naming of this species. A. volubilis comes from Altai in Mongolia, reports for A. volubile in Korea probably refer to A. neotortuosum. Grows well in open woodlands. A climbing plant, twining around supports. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation
:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. This species is easier from seed than most members of the genus. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Young leaves – dried and cooked. This report should be treated with great distrust due to the poisonous nature of the genus[K].

Medicinal Actions & Uses
:
Anaesthetic; Anodyne; Diaphoretic; Diuretic.

The dried root is anaesthetic. It is also used in the same ways as A. napellus, which means that it is anodyne, diaphoretic and diuretic. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Known Hazards: The whole plant is highly toxic – simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Aconitum+volubile
http://www.giftpflanzen.com/aconitum_volubile.html
http://www.asianflora.com/Ranunculaceae/Aconitum-volubile.htm
http://www.abc.se/~m8449/pic/aconitumvol.jpg

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The Real Cause of Influenza Epidemics

flu, influenza, cold, flu shot, vaccination, inoculation, vitamin D, sunshine, sunlight

Influenza does not follow the predicted patterns for infectious diseases. In fact, there are several conundrums associated with influenza epidemics, such as:

1. Why is influenza both seasonal and ubiquitous — and where is the virus between epidemics?

2. Why are influenza epidemics so explosive?

3. Why do epidemics end so abruptly?

4. What explains the frequent coincidental timing of epidemics in countries of similar latitudes?

5. Why did epidemics in previous ages spread so rapidly, despite the lack of modern transport?

A theory gaining weight in the scientific community explains influenza epidemics as a result of a dormant disease, which become active in response to vitamin D deficiency. This theory provides answers for many of the above questions. A disease that remains dormant until vitamin D-producing sunlight exposure is reduced by a winter or rainy season would explain a widespread seasonal disease with a rapid onset and decline.

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There is compelling epidemiological evidence that indicates vitamin D deficiency is just such a “seasonal stimulus.”Recent evidence confirms that lower respiratory tract infections are more frequent, sometimes dramatically so, in those with low levels of vitamin D. Researchers have also found that 2,000 IU of vitamin D per day abolished the seasonality of influenza, and dramatically reduced its self-reported incidence.

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