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Herbs & Plants

Bay Rum Tree

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Botanical Name:  Caryophyllus racemosus

 Family :  Myrtaceae

 Subfamily: Myrtoideae

 Tribe :  Myrteae

 Gender :  Pimenta

 Species :  P.  racemosa

Division :  Magnoliophyta

 Class : Magnoliopsida

 Subclass:  Rosids

 Order :Myrtales

Synonym: Pimenta racemosa

Common Names :Bay Rum essential oil , Bay Rum Tree

Habitat :The Bayrum, is a tree native to the West Indies and Guiana (Pimenta racemosa), whose leaves are obtained essential oils, very aromatic, which are also known as Bayrum.

Description:
The Bayrum is a tree of the Myrtaceae you can have between 4 and 8 meters high, with straight trunk, leafy crown, slow growth, deep roots and very long life.  Also called a bay-rum cologne or aftershave lotion that is obtained from the leaves of Bayrum, which have a pleasant perfume characteristic of different uses in perfumery, widely used in the twentieth century, although its use is now much less common.
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Edible Uses:
It is related to the Allspice and its leaves are also used for cooking. It contains a fragrant oil that somewhat resembles clove oil. This oil used to be distilled in rum and water from the leaves, to produce bay rum, used as cologne.

Medicinal Uses: * Alopecia * Aromatherapy * Colds * Flu
Properties: * Analgesic * Anodyne * Aromatic * Diaphoretic/sudorific * Digestive * Insect repellents
Bay blends nicely with eucalyptus oil, supporting the effects of eucalyptus during cold and flu season while moderating its intense medicinal aroma.

Other Uses:
The leaves of the West Indian Bay Tree, also known as the Bay Rum Tree,(not to be confused with Bay Laurel ) are the source of the essential oil. Dilute the essential oil in olive oil and use as a stimulating scalp tonic, or use with castor oil in pomenades. Bay rum oil is a classic mens fragrance and has been used in hair tonics for hundreds of years. Known for its ability to stimulate the scalp and encourage hair growth, bay rum is found in many OTC hair care products for men. Classic formulas included bay rum oil mixed with rainwater, ammonia and glycerine. Today we generally do not recommend ammonia for hair tonics for while it does open up the hair shaft (hence its inclusion in hair coloring), it is far too toxic for home use.

Toxicity:The fruit, bay rum and essential oil are toxic and should not be ingested.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=es&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fes.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPimenta_racemosa

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Myrtaceae/Pimenta_racemosa.html
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail6.php

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Herbs & Plants

Callistemon rigidus

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Botanical nameCallistemon rigidus
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Callistemon
Species: C. rigidus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Myrtales

Common Name :Stiff Bottlebrush,Flowering Bottlebrush, Red Cluster Bottlebrush . In bengali :Bottlebrush  (botol  burush)

Habitat :It is native to tropical countries     It is endemic to the state of New South Wales in Australia.

Description:This spectacular, and unexpectedly hardy shrub, bears dense spikes of flamboyant red bottle-brush flowers that appear in late spring and early summer. Narrow, sharply pointed leaves adorn this dazzling shrub that is possibly the hardiest of all bottle brushes.

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It grows to between 2 and 3 metres in height and has a stiff, erect habit. The leaves are mostly 50 to 70 mm long and 3 to 4 mm wide. Red flower spikes with darker anthers are produced in summer. Flowers are Showy  and the  leaves have  Fragrant and  are Evergreen.

Medicinal Uses:
The essential oil from the leaves of Callistemon rigidus R. Br., a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, has been analyzed and found to contain thirteen compounds. The oil was predominantly 1, 8-cineole (89.9%).

From stem bark of Callistemon rigidus (Myrtaceae), piceatannol and scirpusin B were isolated as components that exhibit inhibitory effects on alpha-amylase activity in isolated mouse plasma. In particular, scirpusin B also inhibited alpha-amylase in mouse gastrointestinal tract. Thus, we expect the depressive effect on the elevation of postprandial blood glucose may be a new medicinal use of this compound as well as the plant itself.

Other Uses:
Architectural, city courtyard garden, coastal/seaside suitable, container plant, cottage informal garden, drought resistant, flowering shrub, low maintenance, mediterranean, mixed shrub border and fragrance.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callistemon_rigidus
http://www.plantdatabase.co.uk/Callistemon_rigidus
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10412905.1991.9697989
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16755033

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Herbs & Plants

Eugenia chequen

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Botanical Name : Eugenia chequen
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Luma
Species: L. chequen
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Myrtales

Synonyms :  Eugenia chequen Molina, Myrtus chequen (Molina) Spreng., and Luma gayana (Barn.)

Common Names :Chequén, Huillipeta, and Arrayán Blanco (White Myrtle).

Other Names: Arryan, Chekan, Chequén, Eugenia chequen, Luma chequen, Mirte, Myrte du Chili, Myrte du Chili Blanc, Myrtus, Myrtus chequen.

Habitat :Eugenia chequen is native to the central Andes mountains between Chile and Argentina.It has been introduced as ornamental in the North Pacific Coast of the United States.

Description:
It is a shrub (rarely a small tree) growing to 9 m tall, with dull grey-brown bark (unlike the smooth red bark of the related Luma apiculata). It is evergreen, with small fragrant oval leaves 0.5-2.5 cm long and 0.3-1.5 cm broad, and white flowers in early to mid summer. Its fruit is an edible dark purple berry 1 cm in diameter, ripe in early autumn.

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Medicinal Uses:
Most useful in the chronic bronchitis of elderly people and in chronic catarrh of the respiratory organs. People take leaf preparations for diarrhea, fever, gout, high blood pressure, fluid retention, and cough. Cheken leaf oil might affect the way the body breaks down fat and could be useful in lowering high triglycerides, a type of blood fat.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luma_chequen
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/5390791

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-401-CHEKEN.aspx?activeIngredientId=401&activeIngredientName=CHEKEN

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Herbs & Plants

Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia)

Botanical Name : Melaleuca alternifolia/Melaleuca leucadendron, M. leucadendra
Family: Myrtaceae
Subfamily: Myrtoideae
Genus: Melaleuca
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Myrtales
Tribe: Melaleuceae
Syn.  : Melaleuca minor
Common Names : Tea Tree , ti tree,Narrow-leaved Paperbark, Narrow-leaved Tea-tree, Narrow-leaved Ti-tree, or Snow-in-summer,
Cajeput Oil , Weeping tea tree, weeping paperbark

Habitat : There are well over 200 recognised species, most of which are endemic to Australia. A few species occur in Malesia and 7 species are endemic to New Caledonia.

Description:
The species are shrubs and trees growing (depending on species) to 2–30 m (6.6–98 ft) tall, often with flaky, exfoliating bark. The leaves are evergreen, alternately arranged, ovate to lanceolate, 1–25 cm (0.39–9.8 in) long and 0.5–7 cm (0.20–2.8 in) broad, with an entire margin, dark green to grey-green in colour. The flowers are produced in dense clusters along the stems, each flower with fine small petals and a tight bundle of stamens; flower colour varies from white to pink, red, pale yellow or greenish. The fruit is a small capsule containing numerous minute seeds.Leaves are linear, 10-35 mm long and 1 mm wide. White flowers occur in spikes 3-5 cm long. Small woody, cup-shaped fruit are 2-3 mm in diameter.

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Melaleuca is closely related to Callistemon, the main difference between the genera being that the stamens are generally free in Callistemon but grouped into bundles in Melaleuca.

In the wild, Melaleuca plants are generally found in open forest, woodland or shrubland, particularly along watercourses and the edges of swamps.

The best-accepted common name for Melaleuca is simply melaleuca; however most of the larger species are also known as paperbarks, and the smaller types as honey myrtles. They are also sometimes referred to as punk trees.

One well-known melaleuca, the Ti tree (aka tea tree), Melaleuca alternifolia, is notable for its essential oil which is both anti-fungal, and antibiotic, while safely usable for topical applications. This is produced on a commercial scale, and marketed as Tea Tree Oil. The Ti tree is presumably named for the brown colouration of many water courses caused by leaves shed from trees of this and similar species (for a famous example see Brown Lake (Stradbroke Island)). The name “tea tree” is also used for a related genus, Leptospermum. Both Leptospermum and Melaleuca are myrtles of the family, Myrtaceae.

In Australia, Melaleuca species are sometimes used as food plants by the larvae of hepialid moths of the genus Aenetus including A. ligniveren. These burrow horizontally into the trunk then vertically down.

Melaleucas are popular garden plants, both in Australia and other tropical areas worldwide. In Hawai?i and the Florida Everglades, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Broad-leaved Paperbark) was introduced in order to help drain low-lying swampy areas. It has since gone on to become a serious invasive weed with potentially very serious consequences being that the plants are highly flammable and spread aggressively. Melaleuca populations have nearly quadrupled in southern Florida over the past decade, as can be noted on IFAS’s SRFer Mapserver

The genus Callistemon was recently placed into Melaleuca.

Weeds
Melaleucas were introduced to Florida in the United States in the early 20th century to assist in drying out swampy land and as garden plants. Once widely planted in Florida, it formed dense thickets and displaced native vegetation on 391,000 acres (1,580 km2) of wet pine flatwoods, sawgrass marshes, and cypress swamps in the southern part of the state. [It is prohibited by DEP and listed as a noxious weed by FDACS.]

Melaleucas became an invasive species that raised serious environmental issues in Florida’s Everglades and damaged the surrounding economy. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists from the Australian Biological Control Laboratory assisted in solving the problem by releasing biological controls in the form of insects that feed on Melaleuca. These insects are natural predators of Melaleuca in Australia and help control the spread of the weed in the U.S.

Medicinal uses:
Common Uses: Abrasions/Cuts * Abscess/Boil * Acne * Burns/SunBurn * Candida/Yeast Infection * Fungus Infections * Herpes * Insect Bites/Rashes * Insect Repellent * Scabies *

click to see
Properties:  Analgesic* Antibacterial* Vulnerary* Antifungal* AntiViral* Aromatic*
Parts Used: essential oil distilled from leaves
Constituents: pinene, cymene, cineole, terpenes, terpinene, alcohols .

Traditional Aboriginal uses
Australian Aborigines used the leaves traditionally for many medicinal purposes, including chewing the young leaves to alleviate headache and for other ailments.

The softness and flexibility of the paperbark itself made it an extremely useful tree to aboriginal people. It was used to line coolamons when used as cradles, as a bandage, as a sleeping mat, and as material for building humpies. It was also used for wrapping food for cooking (in the same way aluminium foil is today), as a disposable raincoat, and for tamping holes in canoes. In the Gadigal language, it is called Bujor

Modern Uses:
Scientific studies have shown that tea tree oil made from Melaleuca alternifolia is a highly effective topical antibacterial and antifungal, although it may be toxic when ingested internally in large doses or by children. In rare cases, topical products can be absorbed by the skin and result in toxicity.

The oils of Melaleuca can be found in organic solutions of medication that claims to eliminate warts, including the Human papillomavirus. No scientific evidence proves this claim (reference: “Forces of Nature: Warts No More”).

Melaleuca oils are the active ingredient in Burn-Aid, a popular minor burn first aid treatment (an offshoot of the brandname Band-Aid).

Melaleuca oils (tea tree oil) is also used in many pet fish remedies (such as Melafix and Bettafix) to treat bacterial and fungal infections.[citation needed] Bettafix is a lighter dilution of tea tree oil while Melafix is a stronger dilution. It is most commonly used to promote fin and tissue regrowth. The remedies are often associated with Betta fish (Siamese Fighting Fish) but are also used with other fish.

It is the primary species for commercial production of Tea tree oil (melaleuca oil), a topical antibacterial and antifungal used in a range of products including antiseptics, deodorants, shampoos, soaps and lotions.

The essential oil is distilled from the feathery, narrow bright green leaves. Tea tree’s major contribution to the herbal pharmacy is its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Often called a “first aid kit in a bottle”, it is ideal to take along on camping trip or anytime you are traveling. Tea tree is also an all purpose remedy for respiratory infections, acting as an anti-infective agent and strongly stimulating the body’s own.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail56.php#7
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaleuca
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaleuca_alternifolia

http://www.wildcrafted.com.au/Tea_Tree_Oil_(Melaleuca_alternifolia).html

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