Tag Archives: Orissa

Ranabili

Botanical Name : Cipadessa baccifera
Family: Meliaceae (Neem family)
Synonyms: Melia baccifera, Cipadessa fruticosa
Common name: Ranabili

Hindi : nalbila

Kannada :  cheduveera, chittunde, hanoyi, hanumana thoppalu, mandala kaayi, padavali, sidigolu, sitthunde gida, sidugoli, adusoge, hanumantatoppalu, adasaage, bettadabaevu, chaedu beera, chithunde, hanumantatap, mendala kaayi, minnamunni, narachalu gida

Malayalam :   pulippanchedi

Marathi : ranabili, gudmai

Oriya ; pittamari

Tamil : savattuchedi, pulippanchedi, pullipamcheddi, cannatturukka vempu, cevvattai1, pulippan#, pulippan@

Telugu : chedubira, chedu bira, chend bera, rana beri, turaka vepa, hanumantha-bira, chandbera, chanduvira, pottu vepa, purudona, purudonda, ranabilla, thabate, thavitegu

Habitat :Indomalaysia; in the Western_Ghats- throughout.This species is globaly distributed in Indo-Malesia. It is said to be cultivated in Hawaii and under glass in Europe. Within India, it has been recorded in Bihar, Orissa and in the eastern Himalayas up to 1500 m., Maharashtra, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu. It is found in ravines, rock crevices and in thickets and forest edge habitats.

Description:
Ranabili is a shrub 1-4 m tall, with coarse bark. Young branches are grayish brown, ribbed, and covered with yellow velvety hairs and sparse grayish white lenticels. Leaves are compound, 8-30 cm long, with leaf-stalk and spine either hairless or yellow velvety. Leaflets are usually 9-13, opposite, ovate to ovoid-oblong, 3.5-10 × 1.5-5 cm. Flowers are born in clusters 8-15 cm long. Flowers are white, 3-4 mm in diameter. Flower stalks are 1-1.5 mm long. Sepal cup is short, yellow velvety outside. Sepals are broadly triangular. Petals are white or yellow, linear to oblong-elliptic, 2-3.5 mm, outside covered with sparse appressed velvety hairs. Stamens are shorter than petals, with hairy filaments. Fruit is purple to black when mature, round, 4-5 mm in diameter. Flowering: April-October.
click to see the pictures…

 

Medicinal uses: Juice of the root is given in cases of indigestion. It is also used in treating cough and cold. A paste of bark is pressed against the teeth for about 15 mins to relieve bleeding and swelling of gums.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Ranabili.html
http://envis.frlht.org.in/botanical_search.php?txtbtname=Cipadessa+baccifera&gesp=2522%7CCipadessa+baccifera+%28ROTH.%29+MIQ.
http://www.biotik.org/india/species/c/cipabacc/cipabacc_en.html

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Some Medical Question & Answers

Q: My blood sugar value is 180 on an empty stomach and the same after food. I am confused as to whether I am diabetic.

A: It is not very clear what you mean by an empty stomach. If your blood sugar value is more than 120 after an overnight 12 hour fast, you are diabetic. The “post prandial” blood value is taken 2 hours after a normal meal: 200 mg or more means that you are diabetic. A value between 180 and 200 is suspect and classified as “prediabetic”. You need to get the values rechecked. Otherwise you could always do a “glucose tolerance test” or a single “glycosylated haemoglobin” value. This should provide the answers. Instead of trying to sort this out yourself, it is better to contact a physician.

Better safe than sorry:

Q: I read in the newspaper that many children died after immunisation in some states. I am scared to take my daughter for her booster injection. She is now one year old.

A: Some deaths did occur in the states of Tamil Nadu and Orissa after measles immunisation. The deaths occurred in government-run Primary Health Centres (PHCs). The exact cause was not established. One of the theories put forward was that the water used to reconstitute the vials was contaminated with bacteria. Another theory was that the reconstituent liquid was not water but some other colourless but harmful compound. The truth is not known but the immunisation programme has been adversely affected. Immunisations are safe. They are life saving and reduce morbidity owing to preventable illnesses. Many injections are given only once in a lifetime. It would be advisable to go to a private hospital, have individual immunisation (as opposed to the mass campaigns), insist on and pay for single dose vials (as opposed to multidose), and make sure there is adequate documentation both with you and the physician. Better to be safe than sorry.

Ideal distance from TV

Q: My nephew sits very close to the television. I feel he is ruining his eyesight.

A: The ideal distance for watching television is one and a half times the diagonal measurement of the screen. So if it’s a 24-inch screen, the distance should be 36 inches or three feet. If your nephew sits close to the television, his eyesight needs to be checked. He should also be encouraged to engage in activities like playing, reading books, arts and crafts, or puzzles. Perhaps your nephew is being reared as a couch potato, who will eventually join the millions of obese unhealthy young diabetics in our country.

As a general rule, we’ve found that sitting a distance of four to six times the height of your television works for standard PAL pictures. Since HD pictures have fewer noise and artefact issues, the ideal spot for HD viewing is three to four times the height of the screen. This does, of course mean that you would only have to sit four to five feet away from a 32in screen showing HD signals, hence our belief that larger screens will become increasingly popular as HD becomes more common.

High heels are bad

Q: At what age is it permissible to wear heels?

A: By heels I presume you mean high heels which are not really advisable at any age. In children they cause deformities of the feet which are still pliable and growing. In adults, stilettos cause bad posture and are responsible for back and knee problems. Women tend to lose their balance and develop sprains and strains, especially of the ankles. In pregnancy, the centre of gravity is already pushed forward. Heels contribute to loss of balance, falls and injuries.

How much is enough?

Q: I keep reading different recommendations for the amount of exercise needed to keep fit. It is all very confusing.

A: It is not very clear whether you just want to maintain an adequate level of fitness or if you want to lose weight. Exercise alone, with uncontrolled intake, will not result in weight loss. The recommendations for an adequate level of exercise vary from 30 minutes of fast walking three days a week to 40 minutes of jogging every day. The general consensus is that you need to walk or run 10,000 steps a day. There are approximately 2,100-2,500 steps to a mile (1.6km), depending on your stride. This means you need to walk approximately 8km a day. If you run or jog, the time taken to cover this distance is reduced. Exercise then becomes more efficient. The calories burned depends on the total distance covered and not on the speed.

Flat feet

Q: My three-year-old nephew has flat feet. Please advise.

A: Flat foot, or “pes planus”, to give its correct name, may be a perception. The arch may actually be present. This can be determined by asking your nephew to stand on his toes. If the normal arch appears there is no deformity. Usually, even if flat foot, it can be managed conservatively. An obese child should lose weight. The child should be advised to play barefoot. Footwear with arch supports and corrective exercises may be needed if the condition persists even after the age of six.

Sources: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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Parbal (Patol)

Botanical Name: Trichosanthes dioica

Family: Cucurbitaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Cucurbitales
Genus: Trichosanthes
Species: T. dioica
Common Names: Parwal (from Hindi), or potol (from Assamese, Oriya or Bengali ). Colloquially, in India, it is often called green potato.

Habitat :Parbal  plant grows in India,Bangladesh, Burma and Srilanka during summer time only.It is widely cultivated in the eastern part of India, particularly in Orissa, Bengal, Assam, Bihar, and Uttar Pradesh.

Description:It is a vine plant, similar to cucumber and squash.The plant is cripary and an annual plant. It is a dioecious (male and female plants) vine (creeper) plant with heart-shaped leaves (cordate) and is grown on a trellis. The fruits are green with white or no stripes. Size can vary from small and round to thick and long — 2 to 6 inches (5 to 15 cm). It thrives well under a hot to moderately warm and humid climate.Grows during summer season in India.

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Edible Uses:It is used as ingredients of soup, stew, curry, sweet, or eaten fried and as dorma with roe or meat stuffing. In India Parbal is used as Vegetable. Most of the Indian make curry of parbal and eat along with rice or chapati.The fruit is not bitter but the leaf of the plant is bitter in taste.

Medicinal Uses:

It is a good source of carbohydrates, vitamin A, and vitamin C. It also contains major nutrients and trace elements (magnesium, potassium, copper, sulfur, and chlorine) which are needed in small quantities, for playing essential roles in human physiology.

The plant is a cardiac tonic and antifebrile; its decoction is given in bilious fevers as a febrifuge and laxative. Chemically it contais saponin, hydrocarbons, sterols, glycoside and tannins. The fruit is digestive, stomachic and anti-bilious. Its main action is on the head and stomach. The root juice is a strong purgative. The leaf juice is emetic and so it should be taken with coriander to control bilious fever. The leaf juice is applied over the head for the cure of alopecia (baldness).

#Its decoction with chirata and honey is given in bilious fevers as a febrifuge.

#A decoction or infusion of the plant is an efficacious remedy for boils and worms.
#The leaf juice is rubbed over the scalp for the cure of alopecia.

#Powder of the dried root is very effective in curing ascites.
#A decoction of its leaves with chebulic myrobalan taken in the morning on empty stomach is an age-old remedy for acidity and bilious disorders.
#Leaf juice is an age-old remedy for liquor poisoning.
#Leaf juice is a household romedy for controlling high blood pressure.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.online-family-doctor.com/fruits/parbal.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parwal

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Nageshar or Nagchampa (Messua Ferra)

Botanical Name:Mesua Ferrea
Family : Guttiferae
Indian Name :Mesua nagesarium /Nag champa or Nageshar

Vernacular Name:: Sans: Nagakeshara; Eng : Iron-wood.Hind : Naageswar;
Parts Used :Bark, Leaf, Flower

Description:.

Mesua nagesarium is a moderate to large sized evergreen tree with 40-60 feet height. Leaves red when young, lanceolate, covered with waxy bloom underneath. Flowers white and fragrant. Found all over the country.

click  to see. the pictures

Medicinal uses: Flowers, seeds and leaves are used as medicine. Flowers are used as astringent, coughs and bowel complaints. Bark extracts also used to cure astringent. Seeds oil is used as eczema and rheumatism.
Useful in the treatment of Asthma, Skin, Burning, Vomiting, Dysentry and Piles.
Various parts of these plants mainly including flowers, fruits are commonly used in the treatment of rheumatism, skin diseases, dysentery and bleeding piles. For bleeding piles, powder of Nagkeshar (Messua ferra) and Lodhra (Symplocos recemosa) should be taken in the dose of 2 gms thrice daily.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Cultivation method: Its fruits normally ripe on October- November. Squeezed out of seeds from ripe fruits and dried it in sunlight for storing. It is possible to store of this seeds for a long time. February to March is better time for seed sowing. Germination commences within 3-4 weeks. One-two year’s old seedlings are used for transplantation in field.

Medicinal recipe:Asthma, Skin, Burning, Vomiting, Dysentry, Piles.

Nagkesar is a local name of Mesua ferrea. It is well known herb in Chhattisgarh particularly in the regions at Orissa state border. The traditional healers and senior natives of Chhattisgarh are well aware of its medicinal properties and uses. They use it alone and in combination with other herbs in treatment of many common troubles, but the traditional healers of the state are not much aware of Herbal dish Nagkesar Ke Murabba. According to the traditional healers of Bagbahera region, this dish was in use in early days and was very popular among the traditional healers. The healers were recommending this preparation as cardio-tonic. During the ethnobotanical surveys conducted in different parts of Chhattisgarh, I asked the healers about this dish but no one came forward with any information. The traditional healers of Bagbahera region are aware of its method of preparation but they have no reason explaining why this dish is not popular in present time?


Material Required
: Nagkesar fruits and Sugar.

Method of Preparation : The fruits are boiled in water. Separately, sugar is boiled in water to prepare the Chashni (Syrup). The boiled fruits are added in Chashni and the combination is kept under moonlight for one month. Once prepared in bulk, it can be used round the year.
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As per Ayurveda:It is mild ushna, laghu, tikta; subdues deranged kapha; cures diseases of urinary bladder and those caused by deranged vata; beneficial in sore throat and headache.

Parts Used: Fruits, seeds, flowers, leaves and bark.

Therapeutic Uses:

Fruits: astringent, useful in gastric troubles; seeds: oil in rheumatism and cutaneous affections;

Flowers: astringent, stomachic and expectorant; powder mixed with ghee (butter fat) applied externally in bleeding piles;
The flowers are astringent and stomachic

Buds useful in dysentery; leaves: as poultice applied on forehead in severe colds;

Bark: astringent, Sweetish, carminative, binding, cardiotonic; good in asthma answeats; cures ulcers and piles , hot ,dry, easy to digest, digestive, good for fevers, sweats, biliousness, foul breath, scabies, skin eruptions, itching, small tumours, headache, blood and heart troubles, sore throat, cough, hiccough, vomiting, thirst, dysentery, and bleeding piles

Bark is mildly astringent and feebly aromatic. Combined with ginger it is given as a sudorifie,
.In many localities they are used for cough, especially when attended with much expectoration.
A paste made of the flowers with butter and sugar is used in bleeding piles and burning of the feel.

Resources:

http://www.allayurveda.com/topic_month_february2004.htm
http://www.orissafdc.com/products_medicinal_plants.php
http://www.mapbd.com/Mpdes.htm#nageshwar

http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#madayantika

 

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Palas(Butea) Or Flame of the forest

Botanical Name : Butea monosperma
English Name : Flame of the forest
Hindi Name
: Palash, Dhak
Sanskrit Name : Palash

Scientific name: Butea monosperma, Butea frondosa
Family: Faboideae / Leguminosae / Papilionaceae

Common names: Flame of the Forest, Dhak, Palas, Bastard Teak, Parrot Tree, Dhak or Palas (Hindi); Porasum (Tamil) ; Khakda (Gujerati).

Other names::Butea monosperma, Butea frondosa, Erythrina monosperma
Flame of the Forest, Dhak, Bastard Teak, Parrot Tree.

Trade names Palasha, Dhak.

Description:
Butea Monosperma is a tree of Fabaceae plant family. This is a small tree. The leaves are three foliate. Leaflets are coriaceous and round. The flowers bloom in February to March. The flowers are in big racemes and bright orange red in color. The petals are silky and hairy.
East Indian tree bearing a profusion of intense vermilion velvet-textured blooms and yielding a yellow dye.

The Flame of the Forest is a medium sized tree, growing from 20 to 4O feet high, and the trunk is usually crooked and twisted with irregular branches and rough, grey bark. It is seen in all its ugliness in December and January when most of the leaves fall: but from January to March it truly becomes a tree of flame, a riot of orange and vermilion flowers covering the entire crown. These flowers, which are scentless, are massed along the ends of the stalks  dark velvety green like the cup-shaped calices  and the brilliance of the stiff, bright flowers is shown off to perfection by this deep, contrasting color. Each flower consists of five petals comprising one standard, two smaller wings and a very curved beak-shaped keel. It is this keel which gives it the name of Parrot Tree. The back-curving petals are covered with fine, silky hair, which, seen at certain angles, change the deep orange to a silvery salmon-pink. The buds too, have this downy growth and acquire a beautiful mauvish bloom.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES..>..(01)....(1)...(2)..…...(3).….…….

Twisted trunk habit………..PICTURE

The leaves, which appear in April and May, are 10-18″ wide and trifoliate. When fresh they are like soft suede ; thick, velvety and a beautiful pale, bronze green. Old leaves are as firm and tough as leather, smooth above and hairy below. This silky down gives them a silvery appearance from a distance.

The pods, when young, are pale green, are covered with a dense growth of fine hair and sometimes give the effect of a tree in full leaf. They are pendulous and 3 to 4 inches long. When ripe they become yellow-brown and contain flat, brown seeds.

That the flowers contain much nectar is evidenced by the frequent visits of many species of birds; sunbirds, mynahs and babblers are usually to be seen, hurrying from flower to flower, chattering and twittering. With man, also, the tree is very popular, having numerous uses. From an infusion of the flowers a brilliant colouring matter can be obtained, which may be made into water-paint or into a dye. Cotton, prepared with alum, can be dyed a bright yellow or orange.

From the seeds a clear oil is obtained and the gum which exudes from the stems, known as Bengal Kino, is valuable to druggists because of its astringent qualities, and to leather workers because of its tannin. Young roots make a strong fibre which has many uses, the making of rope sandals being one of the most important. Roots, eaten raw, cause giddiness, but, baked, are eaten by Mundari children. The leaves, because of their strength, are sewn together by poor people to make plates and the lovely flowers are popular with all Indian women for adornment of their hair.

The Palas is sacred to the moon and is said to have sprung from the feather of a falcon impregnated with the Soma, the beverage of the Gods, and thus immortalised. It is used in Hindu cremonies for the blessing of calves to ensure their becoming good milkers. When a Brahmin boy becomes a Sadhu, his head is shaved and he is given a Palas leaf to eat—the trifoliate formation representing Vishnu in the middle, Brahma on the left and Shiva on the right.

A rare yellow varity of the Flame of the Forest is sometimes found in India.
Butea Frondosa is named after the Earl of Bute, a patron of Botany and Frondosa, meaning “leafy”. It is a native of India but is not found in the dryest parts, being most common in Central India and the Western Ghats.

Uses:

The Palas is known for much more than its flowers . The powdered flower is used as “gulal” in Holi, the flowers produce a dye which Buddhist monks used to dye their robes, the tree is a host tree for the lac insect and the resinous exudation of the insect gives us shellac/lac with its numerous uses such as polishing and finishing furniture. The most surprising use of lac is as confectioner’s glaze. These glazes are used across the industry including glazing of chocolate covered and sugar coated peanuts & raisins.

Traditional use: KHASI and GARO : Leaf: in delirium; TRIBES OF PURULIATRIBES OF MA YURBHANJA (Orissa) : Seed: (West Bengal) : Seed: in ascaris; as contraceptive; TRIBES OF SANTAL PARGANAS (Bihar) : Root: in tuberculosis; TRIBES OF VARANASI (Uttar Pradesh) : Leaf: in boils; Seed: as vermifuge; TRIBES OF MIRZAPUR (Uttar Pradesh) : Bark: in dysentery; Gum: in diarrhoea, dysentery; TRIBES OF SIWALIK (Uttar Pradesh) : Gum: as tonic; BHAT: Seed: as abortifacient; BHOXA: Bark: in bone fracture, Gum: in piles, urinary complaints; GARHWALI: Leaf: in boil, inflammation, Flower: in diarrhoea, dysentery, pimples, Seed: as anthelmintic; THARU: Gum: as diuretic, Seed: as cooling agent; FOLKS OF DELHI: Gum: as astringent, Flower: as aphrodisiac, astringent, diuretic, Seed: as anthelmintic;Â Â Â FOLKS OF KURUKSHETRA (Haryana): Flower: in stomachache; DANG: Bark: in diarrhoea; TRIBESOFRATANMAHAL HILLS (Gujarat) : Flower: in eye complaints; KORKU (of Maharashtra): Flower, in dysentery; TRIBES OF KHANDLA (Maharashtra) : Flower: in dog bite, urinary complaints; TRIBES OF CHANDRAPURA (Maharashtra) : Leaf: in skin diseases; TRIBES OF JHABUA (Madhya Pradesh) : Root: in dog bite; TRIBES OF SAGAR (Madhya Pradesh): Leaf: as vermifuge, Flower: in diabetes, diarrhoea, piles; TRIBES OF EAST GODAVARI (Andhra Pradesh) : Gum: in diarrhoea; TRIBES OF NILGIRI (Tamil Nadu) : Bark: as haemostatic, in wounds, Flower: in eye complaints; TRIBES OF KANNANORE (Kerala): Flower: in antifertility.

ATHARVA VEDA
: Extract of stem: beneficial for sperms and helps securing conception; CHARAKA SAMHITA : Stem-extract: useful in leprosy, piles, gastroenteritis and menorrha­gia; SUSHRUTA SAMHITA : useful in diseases caused by vayu (wind), Seed: effective against intestinal worms; A YURVEDA : Bark: useful against snake venom, wounds, indigestion, gastroenteritis, fever, tuberculosis, Gum: astringent, beneficial to children and women, Leaf: astringent, sex stimulant, useful in intestinal worms, dyspepsia, piles, menorrhagia, pimples, wounds in mouth/throat, Flower: diuretic, sex stimulant, helps menstruation, useful in gastroenteritis, Seed: useful against intestinal worms.

SIDDHA : Flower-juice: used in preparation of the medicine Murukkam, Seed and Kernel: in Palac

UNANI: Ingredient of the medicine called ‘Dhak(tesu)’ and ‘Samaghke Dhak’.
Chemical contents: Plant: flavonoids, glucosides, butin, butrin, isobutrin, palastrin; Flower: butrin, coriopsin, monospermoside, sulphurein, chalcones; Seed: palasonin, Seed oil: d-Iactone of n-heneicosanoic acid, monospermine, new phytolectin.
Medicinal Usage:    The gum obtained from the tree is astringent and it is used for diarrhea in addition, dysentery. The extracts from the root is used for treating eye-diseases. The leaves are aphrodisiac. In Ayurveda palas leaves have several medicinal properities and uses for different women manstrual problems.

Modern use: Plant  :  alcoholic extract: produces persistent vasodepression in cats, shows activity against earthworms; Bark: insecticide against house flies; Alcohol extract of bark : inhibitory against E. coli and Micrococcus pyogenes var. aureus; Gum: solution applied to check conception; Root (bark) : aphrodisiac, analgesic, anthelmintic, useful in elephan­tiasis, applied in sprue, piles, ulcers, tumours and dropsy; EtOH (50%) extract of leaf: spasmogenic; FlolYer: effective in leprosy, gout; Alcoholic extract: antiestrogenic in mice; Aqueous extract: anti-implantation in rats; along with Hygrophila auriculata leaf and root taken with milk to cure leucorrhoea; Seed (freshly powdered) : effective against Ascaris; Extract (in vitro) : anthelmintic against Asacridia galli worms; finely powdered along with Acorus calamus rhizome or mixed with juice of Cyperus rotundus rhizome: cures delirium; Saline extract: agglutinates erythrocytes of animals; Hot alcoholic extract: anti-implantation and anti-ovulatory in animals.

Remarks: An important tree for lac cultivation, but the lac produced on it is of inferior quality. Bark yields fibre, wood yields timber of poor quality; stem-bark used as fish poison by tribes of South Rajasthan. Plates and bowls are made by stitching the leaves by the tribes of Purulia and Saurashtra. Flowers yield a yellow dye of little permanency.

Flowers are eaten as vegetables by tribes of Manbhum and Hazaribagh Districts of Bihar while fruits by Garhwalis.

Tree is sacred to the Hindus and Buddhists. Flower is an essential item of Saraswati Puja.

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Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

 

Help taken from:http://www.toptropicals.com/html  and http://www.bsienvis.org/medi.htm#Bauhinia%20vahlii