Tag Archives: Pelvic inflammatory disease

Pelvic pain

Definition:
Pelvic pain is pain in the lowest part of your abdomen and pelvis. In women, pelvic pain may refer to symptoms arising from the reproductive or urinary systems or from musculoskeletal sources. Pelvic pain can occur suddenly, sharply and briefly (acute) or over the long term (chronic). Chronic pelvic pain refers to any constant or intermittent pelvic pain that has been present for more than a few months. It can affect both women and men.

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Depending on its source, pelvic pain may be dull or sharp; it may be constant or off and on (intermittent); and it may be mild, moderate or severe. Pelvic pain can sometimes radiate to one’s lower back, buttocks or thighs.

Common causes in include: endometriosis in women, bowel adhesions, irritable bowel syndrome, and interstitial cystitis. The cause may also be a number of poorly understood conditions that may represent abnormal psychoneuromuscular function.

Most women, at some time in their lives, experience pelvic pain. As girls enter puberty, pelvic or abdominal pain becomes a frequent complaint.
Sometimes, it is noticed that pelvic pains only at certain times, such as when  urinating  or during sexual activity.

According to the CDC, Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) accounted for approximately 9% of all visits to gynecologists in 2007. In addition, CPP is the reason for 20—30% of all laparoscopies in adults.

Causes:
Several types of diseases and conditions may cause pelvic pain. Often chronic pelvic pain results from more than one condition.

Pelvic pain may arise from one’s digestive, reproductive or urinary system. Recently, doctors have recognized that some pelvic pain, particularly chronic pelvic pain, may also arise from muscles and connective tissue (ligaments) in the structures of the pelvic floor. Occasionally, pelvic pain may be caused by irritation of nerves in the pelvis.

The different conditions that may cause pelvic pain includs:

*exaggerated bladder, bowel, or uterine pain sensitivity (also known as visceral pain)
pelvic girdle pain (SPD or DSP)

Gynecologic:

*Dysmenorrhea—pain during the menstrual period

*Endometriosis—pain caused by uterine tissue that is outside the uterus. Endometriosis can be visually confirmed by laparoscopy in approximately 75% of adolescent girls with chronic pelvic pain that is resistant to treatment, and in approximately 50% of adolescent in girls with chronic pelvic pain that is not necessarily resistant to treatment.

*Müllerian abnormalities

*Pelvic inflammatory disease—pain caused by damage from infections

*Ovarian cysts—the ovary produces a large, painful cyst, which may rupture

*Ovarian torsion—the ovary is twisted in a way that interferes with its blood supply

*Ectopic pregnancy—a pregnancy implanted outside the uterus

Abdominal:

*Loin pain hematuria syndrome

*Proctitis—infection or inflammation of the anus or rectum

*Colitis—infection or inflammation of the colon

*Appendicitis—infection or inflammation of the bowel

Internal hernias are difficult to identify in women, and misdiagnosis with endometriosis or idiopathic chronic pelvic pain is very common. One cause of misdiagnosis that when the woman lies down flat on an examination table, all of the medical signs of the hernia disappear. The hernia can typically only be detected when symptoms are present, so diagnosis requires positioning the woman’s body in a way that provokes symptoms.

Female reproductive system:
Pelvic pain arising from the female reproductive system may be caused by conditions such as:

*Adenomyosis
*Endometriosis
*Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea)
*Ectopic pregnancy (or other pregnancy-related conditions)
*Miscarriage (before the 20th week) or intrauterine fetal death
*Mittelschmerz (ovulation pain)
*Ovarian cancer
*Ovarian cysts
*Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
*Uterine fibroids
*Vulvodynia

Other causes in women or men:
Examples of other possible causes of pelvic pain — in women or men — include:

*Colon cancer
*Chronic constipation
*Crohn’s disease
*Diverticulitis
*Fibromyalgia
*Interstitial cystitis (also called painful bladder syndrome)
*Intestinal obstruction
*Irritable bowel syndrome
*Kidney stones
*Past physical or sexual abuse
*Pelvic floor muscle spasms
*Prostatitis
*Ulcerative colitis
*Urinary tract infection (UTI)

Diagnosis:
The diagnostic workup begins with a careful history and examination, followed by a pregnancy test. Some women may also need bloodwork or additional imaging studies, and a handful may also benefit from having surgical evaluation.

The absence of visible pathology in chronic pain syndromes should not form the basis for either seeking psychological explanations or questioning the reality of the patient’s pain. Instead it is essential to approach the complexity of chronic pain from a psychophysiological perspective which recognises the importance of the mind-body interaction. Some of the mechanisms by which the limbic system impacts on pain, and in particular myofascial pain, have been clarified by research findings in neurology and psychophysiology.

Differential diagnosis:
In men, chronic pelvic pain (category IIIB) is often misdiagnosed as chronic bacterial prostatitis and needlessly treated with antibiotics exposing the patient to inappropriate antibiotic use and unnecessarily to adverse effects with little if any benefit in most cases. Within a Bulgarian study, where by definition all patients had negative microbiological results, a 65% adverse drug reaction rate was found for patients treated with ciprofloxacin in comparison to a 9% rate for the placebo patients. This was combined with a higher cure rate (69% v 53%) found within the placebo group.

Treatment:
Many women will benefit from a consultation with a physical therapist, a trial of anti-inflammatory medications, hormonal therapy, or even neurological agents.

A hysterectomy is sometimes performed.

Spinal cord stimulation has been explored as a potential treatment option for some time, however there remains to be consensus on where the optimal location of the spinal cord this treatment should be aimed. As the innervation of the pelvic region is from the sacral nerve roots, previous treatments have been aimed at this region; results have been mixed. Spinal cord stimulation aimed at the mid- to high-thoracic region of the spinal cord have produced some positive results.

The sensation of pain travels through nerves up the spinal cord to the brain. Mild antidepressants like amitriptyline and gabapentin can block these transmissions and relieve the pain. They are especially effective if combined with anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen.

IBS and food allergies should also be tackled. Sometimes avoiding milk or wheat or both, and tackling abnormal gut motility works.

Physical activity reduces pain to an extent. Walking, jogging or running for 40 minutes a day is important. This should be combined with stretching and pelvic exercises. And if there is stress, cut it down with yoga and meditation.

Kegel exercise  or pelvic floor exercise   is most effective for Pelvic pain

Click to see :.—>..Homeopathic Treatment for Pelvic Pain

 Ayurvedic Treatment..(1) ...(2)

The treatment of pelvic pain with acupuncture

Pelvic Pain Recovery: Getting Your Life Back with Yoga  :

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelvic_pain
http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/pelvic-pain/basics/definition/sym-20050898
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1141103/jsp/knowhow/story_18992189.jsp#.VFmWH2d2E1I

Pelvic Ultrasound and Transvaginal Ultrasound

Alternative  Names:Endovaginal ultrasound; Ultrasound – transvaginal; Sonohysterography; Hysterosonography; Saline infusion sonography; SIS
.
Definition:
Ultrasound uses sound waves instead of radiation to generate snapshots or moving pictures of structures inside the body. This imaging technique works in a manner similar to radar and sonar, developed in World War II to detect airplanes, missiles, and submarines that were otherwise invisible. After coating your skin with a lubricant to reduce friction, a radiologist or ultrasound technician places an ultrasound transducer, which looks like a microphone, on your skin and may rub it back and forth to get the right view. The transducer sends sound waves into your body and picks up the echoes of the sound waves as they bounce off internal organs and tissue. A computer transforms these echoes into an image that is displayed on a monitor.

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Pelvic organ ultrasound is used to monitor pregnancy, find cysts on your ovaries, examine the lining of your uterus, look for causes of infertility, and find cancers or benign tumors in the pelvic region. Depending on the view needed, the ultrasound sensor is placed either on your abdomen (pelvic ultrasound) or in your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound).

Pelvic ultrasound, primarily performed on females is most frequently used for evaluation of pelvic pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding, inflammatory disease, or detection of a mass. Pelvic ultrasound may help explain findings from a manual examination and provide additional information. Pelvic ultrasound examination will generally result in good depiction of the bladder, uterus, and ovaries.

In some patients, transvaginal ultrasound, which involves the insertion of a small transducer (probe) into the vagina, may be necessary to provide a complete analysis of the ovaries and uterine endometrial lining. Early pregnancy or body habitus (obesity) can obscure adequate evaluation of some structures. The decision to use transvaginal ultrasound is determined by the radiologist following pelvic ultrasound.

Pelvic ultrasound generally requires a full bladder and is performed with the patient lying flat on a padded table. Transvaginal ultrasound testing requires the patient to empty their bladder in the restroom and return to the scanning room for a transvaginal examination. Patients are asked disrobe from the waist down with hips elevated by folded towels or a foam pad. Patients usually insert the probe themselves, but can be assisted.

How to prepare for the test.
You will be asked to undress, usually from the waist down.
Your doctor might ask you to drink a few glasses of water before the test because a full bladder lifts your intestines out of the way and provides a clearer view of your pelvic organs. If you’re having a transvaginal ultrasound and have a tampon in place, you’ll need to remove it before the test.

A full bladder is essential for adequate visualization of the pelvic region.

* Finish drinking 4 glasses (32 ounces total) of water one hour prior to your appointment. It is important to drink water only. Do not substitute other beverages.

* Do not empty your bladder prior to the exam.

* Eat as you normally would before and after the examination and return to your usual or recommended activities after the exam.

To avoid delay or rescheduling of your pelvic / transvaginal ultrasound examination, follow preparation instructions carefully.

* Arrive 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time to register for your test.

* The length of time needed to complete this examination will vary depending on the information needed. Plan for up to 45 minutes to complete your exam.

How the Test is Performed
You will lie down on a table with your knees bent and feet in holders called stirrups. The health care provider will place a probe, called a transducer, into the vagina. The probe is covered with a condom and a gel. The probe sends out sound waves, which reflect off body structures. A computer receives these waves and uses them to create a picture. The doctor can immediately see the picture on a nearby TV monitor.

The health care provider will move the probe within the area to see the pelvic organs. This test can be used during pregnancy.

In some cases, a special transvaginal ultrasound method called saline infusion sonography (SIS), also called sonohysterography or hysterosonography, may be needed to more clearly view the uterus.

This test requires saline (sterile salt water) to be placed into the uterus before the ultrasound. The saline helps outline any abnormal masses, so the doctor can get a better idea of their size.

SIS is not done on pregnant women.

What happens when the test is performed.

You lie on your back on a table for the test. For a pelvic ultrasound, after squirting some clear jelly onto your lower abdomen to help the ultrasound sensor slide around easily, a doctor or technician places the sensor against your skin. For a transvaginal ultrasound, the doctor or technician covers a sensor with a condom and some jelly before inserting it into your vagina.When the sensor is in place, a picture will appear on a video screen. The technician or doctor moves the sensor on your abdomen or in your vagina to see the uterus and ovaries from many different views.

How the Test Will Feel
The test is usually painless, although some women may have mild discomfort from the pressure of the probe. Only a small part of the probe is placed into the vagina.

Risk Factors:
There are no known harmful effects of transvaginal ultrasound on humans.

Unlike traditional x-rays, there is no radiation exposure with this test.

How long is it before the result of the test is known.

If a doctor does the test, you might be able to get preliminary results immediately; this will not be possible if a technician performs the test.Whether a doctor or technician performs the test, he or she records it on a videotape so that it can be formally reviewed by a radiologist. Your doctor should receive the radiologist’s report in a day or two.

Results:
Normal Results

The pelvic structures or fetus are normal.

What Abnormal Results Mean

An abnormal result may be due to many conditions. Some problems that may be seen include:

* Cancers of the uterus, ovaries, vagina, and other pelvic structures
* Non-cancerous growths of the uterus and ovaries (such as cysts or fibroids)
* Twisting of the ovaries
* Infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease
* Birth defects

Some problems that may be found specifically in pregnant women include:

* Ectopic pregnancy
* More than one fetus (twins, triplets, etc.)
* Miscarriage
* Placenta previa
* Placental abruption
* Tumors of pregnancy including gestational trophoblastic disease

Resources:
https://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/diagnostics/pelvic-ultrasound-and-transvaginal-ultrasound.shtml
http://www.tacomarad.com/exams/ultrasound/pelvic.html
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003779.htm

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Chlamydia-a Common Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD)

Definition:Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, which can damage a woman’s reproductive organs. Even though symptoms of chlamydia are usually mild or absent, serious complications that cause irreversible damage, including infertility, can occur “silently” before a woman ever recognizes a problem. Chlamydia also can cause discharge from the penis of an infected man.

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It is one of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections. 1 in 10 sexually active people tested have chlamydia, many do not know they have it. Having a simple test can tell you, if you have it.
Men and women can carry the infection. It is easily treated with antibiotics.

What can Chlamydia do to you?
Women: Chlamydia can spread to other reproductive organs causing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This can lead to long term pelvic pain, blocked fallopian tubes, infertility and ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy that can develop outside the womb).

 

Men: Chlamydia can lead to painful infection in the testicles and possibly reduced fertility. It is thought that in some men it might cause the prostrate to become inflamed.

Men and Women: Inflammation or swelling to the joints can occur (reactive ARTHRITIS). This is sometimes accompanied by inflammation of the urethra (the tube from the bladder to the outside of the body) ad the eye, when it is known as Reiter’s syndrome. This is rare and occurs more in men than in women.

Chlamydia is the most frequently reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States. In 2006, 1,030,911 chlamydial infections were reported to CDC from 50 states and the District of Columbia. Under-reporting is substantial because most people with chlamydia are not aware of their infections and do not seek testing. Also, testing is not often done if patients are treated for their symptoms. An estimated 2,291,000 non-institutionalized U.S. civilians ages 14-39 are infected with Chlamydia based on the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Women are frequently re-infected if their sex partners are not treated.

Causes::Chlamydia can be transmitted during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chlamydia can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby during vaginal childbirth.

Any sexually active person can be infected with chlamydia. The greater the number of sex partners, the greater the risk of infection. Because the cervix (opening to the uterus) of teenage girls and young women is not fully matured and is probably more susceptible to infection, they are at particularly high risk for infection if sexually active. Since chlamydia can be transmitted by oral or anal sex, men who have sex with men are also at risk for chlamydial infection.

Symptoms: Chlamydia is known as a “silent” disease because about three quarters of infected women and about half of infected men have no symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they usually appear within 1 to 3 weeks after exposure.

In women, the bacteria initially infect the cervix and the urethra (urine canal). Women who have symptoms might have an abnormal vaginal discharge or a burning sensation when urinating. When the infection spreads from the cervix to the fallopian tubes (tubes that carry fertilized eggs from the ovaries to the uterus), some women still have no signs or symptoms; others have lower abdominal pain, low back pain, nausea, fever, pain during intercourse, or bleeding between menstrual periods.

Chlamydial infection of the cervix can spread to the rectum.

Men with signs or symptoms might have a discharge from their penis or a burning sensation when urinating. Men might also have burning and itching around the opening of the penis. Pain and swelling in the testicles are uncommon.

Men or women who have receptive anal intercourse may acquire chlamydial infection in the rectum, which can cause rectal pain, discharge, or bleeding. Chlamydia can also be found in the throats of women and men having oral sex with an infected partner.

Complications:If untreated, chlamydial infections can progress to serious reproductive and other health problems with both short-term and long-term consequences. Like the disease itself, the damage that chlamydia causes is often “silent.”

In women, untreated infection can spread into the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This happens in up to 40 percent of women with untreated chlamydia. PID can cause permanent damage to the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues. The damage can lead to chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus). Women infected with chlamydia are up to five times more likely to become infected with HIV, if exposed.

To help prevent the serious consequences of chlamydia, screening at least annually for chlamydia is recommended for all sexually active women age 25 years and younger. An annual screening test also is recommended for older women with risk factors for chlamydia (a new sex partner or multiple sex partners). All pregnant women should have a screening test for chlamydia.

Complications among men are rare. Infection sometimes spreads to the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain, fever, and, rarely, sterility.

Rarely, genital chlamydial infection can cause arthritis that can be accompanied by skin lesions and inflammation of the eye and urethra (Reiter’s syndrome).In pregnant women, there is some evidence that untreated chlamydial infections can lead to premature delivery. Babies who are born to infected mothers can get chlamydial infections in their eyes and respiratory tracts. Chlamydia is a leading cause of early infant pneumonia and conjunctivitis (pink eye) in newborns.

Diagnosis:
There are laboratory tests to diagnose chlamydia. Some can be performed on urine, other tests require that a specimen be collected from a site such as the penis or cervix.

Treatment:Chlamydia can be easily treated and cured with antibiotics. A single dose of azithromycin or a week of doxycycline (twice daily) are the most commonly used treatments. HIV-positive persons with chlamydia should receive the same treatment as those who are HIV negative.

All sex partners should be evaluated, tested, and treated. Persons with chlamydia should abstain from sexual intercourse until they and their sex partners have completed treatment, otherwise re-infection is possible.

Women whose sex partners have not been appropriately treated are at high risk for re-infection. Having multiple infections increases a woman’s risk of serious reproductive health complications, including infertility. Retesting should be encouraged for women three to four months after treatment. This is especially true if a woman does not know if her sex partner received treatment.

Herbal Treatment: YOU can fight infection causing inflammation of the genitals, vaginal or urethral discharge, difficulty urinating, painful intercourse, itching, or prostatitis with these herbs from Mother Nature’s medicine chest:

Astragalus, red clover, echinacea extract, goldenseal extract.

Quik Tip:
Red clover is a deeply nutritive herb with positive implications in the treatment of hormonal difficulties, infections and even cancer.

Prevention: The surest way to avoid transmission of STDs is to abstain from sexual contact, or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to be uninfected.

Latex male condoms, when used consistently and correctly, can reduce the risk of transmission of chlamydia.

CDC recommends yearly chlamydia testing of all sexually active women age 25 or younger, older women with risk factors for chlamydial infections (those who have a new sex partner or multiple sex partners), and all pregnant women. An appropriate sexual risk assessment by a health care provider should always be conducted and may indicate more frequent screening for some women.

Any genital symptoms such as an unusual sore, discharge with odor, burning during urination, or bleeding between menstrual cycles could mean an STD infection. If a woman has any of these symptoms, she should stop having sex and consult a health care provider immediately. Treating STDs early can prevent PID. Women who are told they have an STD and are treated for it should notify all of their recent sex partners (sex partners within the preceding 60 days) so they can see a health care provider and be evaluated for STDs. Sexual activity should not resume until all sex partners have been examined and, if necessary, treated.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

For more Information You may contact:
Division of STD Prevention (DSTDP)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
www.cdc.gov/std

Order Publication Online at www.cdc.gov/std/pubs

CDC-INFO Contact Center
1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)
Email: cdcinfo@cdc.gov

CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN)
P.O. Box 6003
Rockville, MD 20849-6003
1-800-458-5231
1-888-282-7681 Fax
1-800-243-7012 TTY
E-mail: info@cdcnpin.org

American Social Health Association (ASHA)
P.O. Box 13827
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3827
1-800-783-987

Resources:
http://www.asplandsmedicalcentre.co.uk/t11013.html
http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/STDFact-Chlamydia.htm#WhatIs
http://www.herbnews.org/chlamydiadone.htm

Bacterial Vaginosis

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal infection (vaginitis). For grammatical reasons, some people prefer to call it vaginal bacteriosis. It is NOT generally considered to be a sexually transmitted infection . BV is caused by an imbalance of naturally occurring bacterial flora, and should not be confused with yeast infection (candidiasis), or infection with Trichomonas vaginalis (trichomoniasis) which are not caused by bacteria.

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Symptoms:

The most common symptom of BV is an abnormal vaginal discharge (especially after sex) with an unpleasant fishy smell. There is rarely itching.Nearly half of all women with BV don’t notice any symptoms. By contrast, a ‘normal’ discharge will be odourless and will vary in consistency and amount with your menstrual cycle – a normal discharge is at its clearest about 2 weeks before your period starts.

General Diagnosis:
When you go to your healthcare provider with questions about vaginal discharge, he or she will have several diagnoses in mind to account for it. These may include:

1.The discharge is normal for you
2.Candidiasis (thrush, or a yeast infection)
3.Trichomonas vaginalis (trichomoniasis)
4.Bacterial vaginosis
To find out which of these is the case, a few simple tests are done. The provider will carry out a speculum examination and take some swabs from high in the vagina. These swabs will be tested for:

1.A characteristic smell—this is called the whiff test. A small amount of an alkali is added to a microscope slide that has been swabbed with the discharge—a ‘fishy’ odour is a positive result for bacterial vaginosis.
2.Loss of acidity—the vagina is normally slightly acidic (with a pH of 3.8–4.2), which helps to control bacteria. A swab of the discharge is put onto litmus paper to check the acidity.A positive result for bacterial vaginosis would be a pH of over 4.5.

3.’Clue cells’—so called because they give a clue to the reason behind the discharge. These are epithelial cells (like skin) that are coated with bacteria. They can be seen under microscopic examination of your discharge.
Two positive results in addition to the discharge itself are enough to diagnose BV. If there is no discharge, then all 3 criteria are needed.

What might be done?
Your doctor may be able to diagnose bacterial vaginosis from your symptoms. swabs of any discharge may be taken and tested to confirm the diagnosis.

Causes:
Bacterial vaginosis is caused by excess growth of some of the bacteria that normally live in the vagina, particularly gardnerella vaginalis and mycoplasma hominis. as a result, the natural balance of organisms, in the vagina is altered. the reason for this excess growth is unknown, but the condition is more common in sexually active women and often, but notalways, occurs in association with sexually transmitted diseases. vaginal infections can also be caused by an overgrowth of the candida fungus and the protozoan trichomonas vaginalis. Bacterial vaginosis often causes no symptoms. however, some women have a grayish white vaginal discharge with a fishy or musty odor and vaginal or vulval itching. rarely, the disorder leads to pelvic inflammatory disease, in which some of thereproductive organs become inflamed.

A healthy vagina normally contains many microorganisms, some of the common ones are Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii. Lactobacillus, particularly hydrogen peroxide-producing species, appears to help prevent other vaginal microorganisms from multiplying to a level where they cause symptoms. (Note: Lactobacillus acidophilus is not one of the species of Lactobacillus identified as playing a protective role in vaginal flora.) The microorganisms involved in BV are very diverse, but include Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus, Bacteroides, and Mycoplasma. A change in normal bacterial flora including the reduction of lactobacillus, which may be due to the use of antibiotics or pH imbalance, allows more resistant bacteria to gain a foothold and multiply. In turn these produce toxins which affect the body’s natural defenses and make re-colonization of healthy bacteria more difficult.

Most cases of bacterial vaginosis occur in sexually active women between the ages of 15 and 44, especially after contact with a new partner. Condoms may provide some protection and there is no evidence that spermicide increases BV risk. Although BV appears to be associated with sexual activity, there is no clear evidence of sexual transmission.Rather, BV is a disordering of the chemical and biological balance of the normal flora. Recent research is exploring the link between sexual partner treatment and eradication of recurrent cases of BV. Pregnant women and women with sexually transmitted infections are especially at risk for getting this infection. Bacterial vaginosis does not usually affect women after menopause. A 2005 study by researchers at Ghent University in Belgium showed that subclinical iron deficiency (anemia) was a strong predictor of bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. A longitudinal study published in February 2006 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology showed a link between psychosocial stress and bacterial vaginosis independent of other risk factors.

Complications:
Although previously considered a mere nuisance infection, untreated bacterial vaginosis may cause serious complications, suchas increased succeptibility to sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and may present other complications for pregnant women. It has also been associated with an increase in the development of Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) following surgical procedures such as a hysterectomy or an abortion.

Modern Treatment:
Bacterial vaginosis can be cured by antibiotics such as metronidazole and clindamycin. However, there is a high rate of recurrence. Currently, there are very few over the counter products that address bacterial vaginosis. A vaginal gel product called

RepHresh claims to regulate the pH level. Boric acid capsules inserted vaginally is considered a home treatment.

Lactobacillus supplements may also be used; Fem-dophilus (Jarrow Formulas) is a lactobacillus product which specifically claims to help maintain healthy vaginal flora.

It should be noted that seeking medical attention is often necessary, because none of the over the counter products can claim to treat an active infection. More importantly, patients often inaccurately diagnose BV as a yeast infection, and delay proper treatment which may lead to complications.

In a randomized controlled trial, researchers found the efficacy of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel in treating bacterial vaginosis (cure rate 70.7%) was equivalent to that of standard oral metronidazole treatment (cure rate 71%). Treatment with vaginal metronidazole gel was associated with fewer gastrointestinal complaints.

Natural Remedies of Bacterial Vaginosis

Herbal Remedy for Bacterial Vaginosis

Homeopathic Therapeutics. Aspergillus; Candida; Notatum ..

Bacterial Vaginosis & Homeopathy

Homeopathic Medicines for Bacterial Vaginosis

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Resources:
http://www.charak.com/DiseasePage.asp?thx=1&id=226
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_vaginosis.

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Female Sterility

As you know, the union of sperm and ovum and the implantation of the foetus in the wall of the uterus leads to pregnancy. For its proper development, the foetus needs adequate and correct nourishment – provided through the mother’s umbilical chord. The mother therefore should be free from disease during the entire period of pregnancy – through conception and gestation. Sterility in females is thus a result of either the impairment of the ovary, uterus, fallopian tubes, or hormones controlling the functions of these organs as well as diseases suffered by the would-be mother…..CLICK & SEE

Defects in the genital organs may be structural (organic) or functional. To correct the organic defects, surgical measures have to be taken. Functional defects of the organs, termed bandbyatva in Ayurveda and caused by the simultaneous aggravation of all the three doshas, can be successfully treated by Ayurvedic medicines.

Herbal Remedies

Phala ghrita

Very effective in the treatment of this condition. Mixed with milk, it is given to the patient in a dose of two teaspoonfuls twice daily on an empty stomach. Vanga Bhasma is the medicine of choice for the treatment of this condition – given to the patient in a dose of 0.125 gm. twice daily, mixed with honey. Shilajeet is one of the most effective drugs for the cure of sterility. In a dose of one teaspoonful, twice daily.

Bala (Sida cordifolia)

Used both locally and internally. The root of this plant is boiled in oil and milk. It is used with lukewarm water as a douche. Nis brings about a change in the mucous membrane of the genital tract that aids the effective combination of ovum and sperm in the uterus. This medicated oil is also used internally in a dose of one teaspoonful in the morning with a cup of milk.

Banyan Roots :..

The tender roots of the banyan tree are one of the valuable remedies found beneficial in the treatment of female sterility where there are no organic defects or congenital deformities. The roots should be dried in the shade and finely powdered. About 20gms of powder should be mixed with milk, which should be five times the weight of the powder, and taken at night – for three consecutive nights after the monthly periods are over.

 

Jambul Leaves :

An infusion of the fresh tender leaves of the jambul tree is an excellent remedy in such cases. The infusion can be prepared by pouring 250ml of boiling water over 20gms of fresh jambul leaves and allowing it to steep for two hour. The infusion can be taken with either two-teaspoonfuls of honey or 200 ml of buttermilk.

Winter Cherry :…...CLICK & SEE

This herb is another valuable and helpful remedy. The herb should be powdered and six grams of this powder should be taken with one cup of milk for five to six nights after menstruation.

Certain nutrients, especially vitamins C & E and zinc, when supplemented into the diet have been found helpful in some cases of sterility.

Healing Options :

Ayurvedic Supplements: 1. Vita-ex Gold 2.Supari Pak 3. Shilajeet 4. Sundari Kalp Forte

Diet: Alkaline and pungent food should not be taken by person suffering from sterility. They should be given fruits and sweet things in large quantity.

Lifestyle : The bowels should be cleansed by a warm-water enema during the period of fasting and afterwards when necessary. Excessive fat often results in sterility. In such cases weight should be reduced of diet and through exercise.

Yoga : Cobra (Bhujanga Asana) 2.Vajrasana

Home Remedies

Infertility Secrets

Natural advice to cure Female Sterility

Herbal remedy

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Source:Allayurveda.com

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