Tag Archives: Physical examination

Oxygen Saturation Test

Definition:
Your red blood cells must carry sufficient oxygen through your arteries to all of your internal organs to keep you alive. Normally, when red blood cells pass through the lungs, 95%-100% of them are loaded, or “saturated,” with oxygen to carry. If you have lung disease or other types of medical conditions, fewer of your red blood cells may be carrying their usual load of oxygen, and your oxygen saturation might be lower than 95%. Your blood oxygen level can be measured in two ways.

How  the test is performed?
An estimate of your oxygen saturation can be made easily and painlessly with a clip that fits on your finger. This clip shines a light through one side of your finger; a detector measures the light that comes through the other side. This machine can make a good guess about your oxygen saturation because blood cells that are saturated with oxygen absorb and reflect light differently than those that are not. Blood cells are a bright red when they are loaded with oxygen, and they change to a bluish color when they are no longer carrying a full load. This machine cannot give a perfect measurement of your oxygen saturation; it can give only a rough estimate, and its measurement can be affected by things as simple as red nail polish on your finger.

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A better test for measuring your oxygen saturation is an arterial blood gas test. For this test, a small sample of blood must be drawn directly out of an artery. Most routine blood tests use blood that is drawn out of a vein, so this test is a little different. The artery that is sampled most often is the radial artery in your wrist, the one you can feel when you take your pulse. To draw blood from this artery, your doctor or a technician feels your pulse before inserting the needle. Some patients find that it hurts a little more to have blood taken from an artery instead of a vein, but the procedure takes only a few seconds. Your arterial blood can be directly tested for its oxygen level, and other tests (such as the level of carbon dioxide and the pH of the blood) can be done as well.

How do you prepare for the test?
No preparation  is needed.

Risk Factors:
Measurement made with a fingerclip has no risks. The risks of an arterial blood gas test are very small. Even temporary injury to your artery is unlikely to cause a problem, because most patients pump blood to their hand through more than one artery.

Before drawing your blood, your doctor may do a brief physical examination to make sure that you still get good blood flow to your hand even when one wrist artery is blocked. To do this test, the doctor presses down first on both sides of your wrist to block blood flow, until your hand becomes pale. Then he or she lifts off the pressure from one side to see if that is enough to let your hand turn pink again.

Must you do anything special after the test is over?
You will need to have pressure held over the artery for a few minutes after the blood is drawn, because arteries are more likely than veins to bleed afterward.

How long is it before the result of the test is known?
The results of the arterial blood gas test are processed very quickly and are available within 15 minutes in most laboratories. The fingerclip estimate of oxygen is available immediately.

Resources:
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diagnostic-tests/oxygen-saturation-test.htm

Osteoarthritis (OA)

Alternative Names : Hypertrophic osteoarthritis; Osteoarthrosis; Degenerative joint disease; DJD; OA; Arthritis – osteoarthritis.

Definition : Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder.
Osteoarthritis (previously called degenerative arthritis, degenerative joint disease) is a chronic disorder of joint cartilage and surrounding tissues that is characterized by pain, stiffness, and loss of function.

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Osteoarthritis also occurs in almost all animals with a backbone—including fish, amphibians, and birds. Because the disorder is so widespread in the animal kingdom, some authorities believe that osteoarthritis may have evolved from an ancient method of cartilage repair.

Many myths about osteoarthritis persist—for example, that it is an inevitable part of aging, like gray hair and skin changes; that it results in little disability; and that treatment is not effective. Although osteoarthritis is more common in older people, it is not caused simply by the wear and tear that occurs with years of use. Instead, microscopic changes in the structure and composition of cartilage appear to be responsible. Most people who have the disorder, especially younger people, have few if any symptoms; however, some older people develop significant disabilities.
Causes:
Most of the time, the cause of OA is unknown. It is mainly related to aging, but metabolic, genetic, chemical, and mechanical factors can also lead to OA.

Normally, joints have such a low friction level that they are protected from wearing out, even after years of use. Osteoarthritis probably begins most often with an abnormality of the cells that synthesize the components of cartilage, such as collagen (a tough, fibrous protein in connective tissue) and proteoglycans (substances that provide resilience). Next, the cartilage may swell because of water retention, become soft, and then develop cracks on the surface. Tiny cavities form in the bone beneath the cartilage, weakening the bone. Bone can overgrow at the edges of the joint, producing bumps (osteophytes) that can be seen and felt. Ultimately, the smooth, slippery surface of the cartilage becomes rough and pitted, so that the joint can no longer move smoothly and absorb impact. All the components of the joint—bone, joint capsule (tissues that enclose most joints), synovial tissue (tissue lining the joint), tendons, ligaments, and cartilage—fail in various ways, thus altering the joint.

The symptoms of osteoarthritis usually appear in middle age and almost everyone has them by age 70. Before age 55, the condition occurs equally in both sexes. However, after 55 it is more common in women.

The disease causes the cushioning (cartilage) between the bone joints to wear away, leading to pain and stiffness. As the disease gets worse, the cartilage disappears and the bone rubs on bone. Bony spurs usually form around the joint.

OA can be primary or secondary.

Primary OA occurs without any type of injury or obvious cause.

Secondary OA is osteoarthritis due to another disease or condition. The most common causes of secondary OA are metabolic conditions, such as acromegaly, problems with anatomy (for example, being bow-legged), injury, or inflammatory disorders such as septic arthritis.

Some people who repetitively stress one joint or a group of joints, such as foundry workers, coal miners, and bus drivers, are particularly at risk. Much of the risk for osteoarthritis of the knee comes from occupations that involve bending of the joint. Curiously, long-distance running champions appear not to be at higher risk of developing the disorder. However, once osteoarthritis develops, this type of exercise often makes the disorder worse. Obesity may be a major factor in the development of osteoarthritis, particularly of the knee and especially in women.
Symptoms :

The symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

*Deep aching joint pain that gets worse after exercise or putting weight on it and is relieved by rest.

*Grating of the joint with motion

*Joint pain in rainy weather

*Joint swelling

*Limited movement

*Morning stiffness

Some people might not have symptoms.

Usually, symptoms develop gradually and affect only one or a few joints at first. Joints of the fingers, base of the thumbs, neck, lower back, big toes, hips, and knees are commonly affected. Pain, usually made worse by activities that involve weight bearing (such as standing), is the first symptom. In some people, the joint may be stiff after sleep or some other inactivity, but the stiffness usually subsides within 30 minutes of moving the joint.

As the condition causes more symptoms, the joint may become less movable and eventually may not be able to fully straighten or bend. The attempt of the tissues to repair may lead to new growth of cartilage, bone, and other tissue, which can enlarge the joints. The irregular cartilage surfaces cause joints to grind, grate, or crackle when they are moved. Bony growths commonly develop in the joints at the ends or middle of the fingers (called Heberden’s or Bouchard’s nodes).

Osteoarthritis
In some joints (such as the knee), the ligaments, which surround and support the joint, stretch so that the joint becomes unstable. Alternatively, the hip or knee may become stiff, losing its range of motion. Touching or moving the joint (particularly when standing, climbing stairs, or walking) can be very painful.

Osteoarthritis often affects the spine. Back pain is the most common symptom. Usually, damaged disks or joints in the spine cause only mild pain and stiffness. However, osteoarthritis in the neck or lower back can cause numbness, pain, and weakness in an arm or leg if the overgrowth of bone presses on nerves. The overgrowth of bone may be within the spinal canal, pressing on nerves before they exit the canal to go to the legs. This may cause leg pain after walking, suggesting incorrectly that the person has a reduced blood supply to the legs (intermittent claudication (see Peripheral Arterial Disease: Arteries of the Legs and Arms). Rarely, bony growths compress the esophagus, making swallowing difficult.

Osteoarthritis may be stable for many years or may progress very rapidly, but most often it progresses slowly after symptoms develop. Many people develop some degree of disability.

Diagnosis:

Exams and Tests

A physical exam can show limited range of motion, grating of a joint with motion, joint swelling, and tenderness.

An x-ray of affected joints will show loss of the joint space, and in advanced cases, wearing down of the ends of the bone and bone spurs.
The doctor makes the diagnosis based on the characteristic symptoms, physical examination, and the x-ray appearance of joints (such as bone enlargement and narrowing of the joint space). By age 40, many people have some evidence of osteoarthritis on x-rays, especially in weight-bearing joints such as the hip and knee, but only half of these people have symptoms. However, x-rays are not very useful for detecting osteoarthritis early because they do not show changes in cartilage, which is where the earliest abnormalities occur. Also, changes on the x-ray correlate poorly with symptoms. For example, an x-ray may show only a minor change while the person is having severe symptoms, or an x-ray may show numerous changes while the person is having very few, if any, symptoms.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal early changes in cartilage, but it is rarely needed for the diagnosis. Also, MRI is too expensive to justify routine use. There are no blood tests for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, although blood tests may help rule out other disorders

Treatment :
The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, maintain or improve joint movement, increase the strength of the joints, and reduce the disabling affects of the disease. The treatment depends on which joints are involved.

MEDICATIONS:

The most common medications used to treat osteoarthritis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). They are pain relievers that reduce pain and swelling. Types include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen.

Although NSAIDs work well, long-term use of these drugs can cause stomach problems, such as ulcers and bleeding. Manufacturers of NSAIDs include a warning label on their products that alerts users to an increased risk for cardiovascular events (heart attacks and strokes) and gastrointestinal bleeding.

Other medications used to treat OA include:

  • COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs). Coxibs block a substance called COX-2 that causes swelling. This class of drugs was first thought to work as well as other NSAIDs, but with fewer stomach problems. However, reports of heart attacks and stroke have led the FDA to re-evaluate the risks and benefits of the COX-2s. Celecoxib (Celebrex) is still available at the time of this report, but labeled with strong warnings and a recommendation that it be prescribed at the lowest possible dose for the shortest possible period of time. Ask your doctor whether the drug is right and safe for you.
  • Steroids. These medications are injected right into the joint. They can also be used to reduce inflammation and pain.
  • Supplements. Many people are helped by over-the-counter remedies such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. There is some evidence that these supplements can help control pain, although they do not seem to grow new cartilage.
  • Artificial joint fluid (Synvisc, Hyalgan). These medications can be injected into the knee. They may relieve pain for up to 6 months.

LIFESTYLE CHANGES
Exercise helps maintain joint and overall movement. Ask your health care provider to recommend an appropriate home exercise routine. Water exercises, such as swimming, are especially helpful.

Applying heat and cold, protecting the joints, using self-help devices, and rest are all recommended.

Good nutrition and careful weight control are also important. If you’re overweight, losing weight will reduce the strain on the knee and ankle joints.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Physical therapy can help improve muscle strength and the motion at stiff joints. Therapists have many techniques for treating osteoarthritis. If therapy does not make you feel better after 3-6 weeks, then it likely will not work at all.

BRACES
Splints and braces can sometimes support weakened joints. Some prevent the joint from moving; others allow some movement. You should use a brace only when your doctor or therapist recommends one. Using a brace the wrong way can cause joint damage, stiffness, and pain.

SURGERY
Severe cases of osteoarthritis might need surgery to replace or repair damaged joints. Surgical options include:

  • Total or partial replacement of the damaged joint with an artificial joint (knee arthroplasty,hip arthroplasty)
  • Arthroscopic surgery to trim torn and damaged cartilage and wash out the joint
  • Cartilage restoration to replace the damaged or missing cartilage in some younger patents with arthritis
  • Change in the alignment of a bone to relieve stress on the bone or joint (osteotomy)
  • Surgical fusion of bones, usually in the spine (arthrodesis)

Prognosis:
Your movement may become very limited. Treatment generally improves function.

Possible Complications :
Decreased ability to walk
Decreased ability to perform everyday activities, such as personal hygiene, household chores, or cooking
Adverse reactions to drugs used for treatment
Surgical complications
When to Contact a Medical Professional

Complementary or alternative therapies for osteoarthritis

.Alternative Therapies

Use of Alternative Therapy, Quality of Life, And Healthcare Spending in Chinese Patients with Osteoarthritis.
Acupuncture Therapy , methods

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Prevention :
Weight loss can reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis in overweight women.
How to Live With Osteoarthritis :

*Exercise affected joints gently (in a pool, if possible)

*Massage at and around affected joints (this measure should preferably be performed by a trained therapist)

*Apply a heating pad or a damp and warm towel to affected joints

*Maintain an appropriate weight (so as not to place extra stress on joints)

*Use special equipment as necessary (for example, cane, crutches, walker, neck collar, or elastic knee support to protect joints from overuse; a fixed seat placed in a bathtub to enable less stretching while washing)

*Wear well-supported shoes or athletic shoes


Disclaimer:
This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000423.htm
http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec05/ch066/ch066a.html

 

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Modern Medical Tests To Save Your Life

 

Medical Tests That Can Save Your Life :-

Male – 20-39

Men 20-39
It’s easy to take your health for granted when you’re young. But people under 40 still face some risk of certain diseases — illnesses that can be treated if caught early on. Try to get the following exams done as recommended. If you establish good screening habits now, you’re likely to continue them in the future.

Click on a test name for more information about that exam.

Once a month:

Testicular self-exam
Skin self-check

Twice a year:

Dental checkup

Every year:

Blood pressure check
Cholesterol check
Clinical testicular exam

Every three years:
Fasting blood-glucose test
Clinical skin exam

Variable:
Eye exam: at least once between puberty and age 40
HIV test

Immunizations:
Tetanus-diphtheria booster: every ten years
Hepatitis B vaccine: once, for at-risk people

More Tools and Quizzes

Female-20-39

Women 20-39
It’s easy to take your health for granted when you’re young. But people under 40 still face some risk of certain diseases — illnesses that can be treated if caught early on. Try to get the following exams performed as recommended. If you establish good screening habits now, you’re likely to continue them in the future.

Click on a test name for more information about that exam.

Once a month:
Breast self-exam
Skin self-check

Twice a year:
Dental checkup

Every year:
Blood pressure check
Cholesterol check
Pap test and pelvic exam
Clinical breast exam

Every three years:
Fasting blood-glucose test
Clinical skin exam

Variable:
Eye exam: at least once between puberty and age 40

Immunizations:
Tetanus-diphtheria booster: every ten years
Hepatitis B vaccine: once, for at-risk people

More Tools and Quizzes
Men 40-49
At 40, you may notice that you’re gaining weight or getting fatigued more easily than before. It’s important to make sure you get these recommended tests done on a regular basis.

Click on a test name for more information about that exam.

Once a month:
Testicular self-exam
Skin self-check

Twice a year:
Dental checkup

Every Year:
Blood pressure check
Cholesterol check
Clinical testicular exam
Digital rectal exam

Every three years:
Fasting blood-glucose test
Clinical skin exam

Variable:
HIV test
Eye exam

Immunizations:
Tetanus-diphtheria booster: every ten years
Hepatitis B vaccine: once, for at-risk people

More Tools and Quizzes

Women 40-49
At age 40, you’re probably more aware of health risks and diseases than you were before. Your body is beginning to experience a decline in estrogen, which leads to an increased risk of heart disease and osteoporosis. Regular medical exams are now more important than ever. Stick to these recommendations unless your doctor advises a different schedule based on your risk factors and personal and family medical history.

Click on a test name for more information about that exam.

Once a month:
Breast self-exam
Skin self-check

Twice a year:
Dental checkup

Every year:
Clinical skin exam
Blood pressure check
Cholesterol check
Pap test and pelvic exam
Clinical breast exam
Mammogram
Digital rectal exam

Every two years:
Eye exam

Every three years:
Fasting blood-glucose test

Variable:
HIV test

Optional:
Bone mineral density test

Immunizations:
Tetanus-diphtheria booster: every ten years
Hepatitis B vaccine: once, for at-risk people

More Tools and Quizzes

Men 50+
In your fifties and beyond, your risk for numerous illnesses, including prostate cancer and colorectal cancer, greatly increases. While getting a colonoscopy may not be at the top of your to-do list, you should try to stick to the following recommended schedule.

Click on a test name for more information about that exam.

Once a month:

Testicular self-exam
Skin self-check

Twice a year:
Dental checkup

Every year:
Blood pressure check
Cholesterol check
Clinical testicular exam
Fecal occult blood test

Every three years:
Fasting blood-glucose test
Clinical skin exam

Every three to five years:
Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test

Every five years
Flexible sigmoidoscopy

Every decade:
Colonoscopy

Variable:
HIV test
Eye exam

Immunizations:
Tetanus-diphtheria booster: every ten years
Hepatitis B vaccine: once, for at-risk people
Influenza vaccine: every year if 65 or older

More Tools and Quizzes

Women 50 +
It can’t happen to me.” That’s the unfortunate mind-set that causes many people to skip simple medical screening tests. As a result, thousands die each year from diseases that could have been treated. Consider these figures:

1.If everyone over 50 followed official colon-cancer screening recommendations, the death rate from colon cancer would be reduced by up to 50%.

2.Widespread blood pressure screening and treatment have cut the death rate from stroke and heart attack by at least 50%.

3.In women over age 50, yearly mammograms reduce the breast-cancer death rate by 30%.

4.Between 1955 and 1992, deaths from cervical cancer declined by 74%, mainly because women started having regular Pap tests.

To help you figure out which tests you need, I tried to search out and got the compiled lists of exams for men and women in three age groups. These are recommendations for healthy people at average risk. Always talk to your doctor about a schedule that meets your needs.

Source :Reader’s Digest

Dogs as Disease Detectors

 

There is no question that dogs can provide companionship, protection, and other services. But could there be another use for our canine friends? Some anecdotal evidence and a sprinkling of scientific studies suggest that dogs can detect seizures and cancers (like skin melanoma and prostate cancer). Though the research is still in its infancy, preliminary results have already provided insight on developing new medical technologies…………..CLICK & SEE

Detecting Seizures
Though many anecdotal stories suggest dogs can alert their owners before a seizure, there has been little research on how dogs might detect seizures before they happen. Some theorize that the dogs may smell a chemical or other scent that is released just prior to a seizure. Others believe the dog‘s attachment to his or her owner helps in detecting subtle scent and behavioral changes before a seizure. Only a very small percentage of these service dogs are currently able to reliably warn their owners before a seizure. Some researchers have studied whether these skills could be taught………….click & see

Researchers in the UK reported in the January 1999 and January 2001 issues of Seizure on dogs they had trained that could detect seizures 15  to 45 minutes prior to the episodes beginning. In addition, the researchers found that the people using these dogs actually reported fewer seizures. Though these results are promising, in most cases it still seems that this skill is inherent in a dog’s personality, rather than something that can be taught. Future research may reveal what these dogs are detecting and how this information can be applied in the hospital setting.

There is no doubt that trained seizure alert dogs can alert help, help prevent injury and watch over someone when they are having a seizure. However, the Epilepsy Foundation cautions people against rushing into spending thousands of dollars for a dog said to have skills of prior seizure detection, at least until the research supports a specific training regimen.

Detecting Cancer
There has also been anecdotal evidence of dogs being able to sniff out cancer and warn their owners. A brief report in a 1989 issue of the Lancet describes how one dog discovered a cancerous skin tumor on her owner’s leg. Researchers have been able to teach bomb-sniffing dogs how to detect cancer using similar training techniques. Other research supports the theory that dogs have the ability to smell cancer. But the real promise may be in learning how dogs can do this and possibly developing medical technology to do the same..click & see

The Future of Dogs as Doctors….click & see
Dogs may never be used in the physician’s office. However, studying how animals can detect disease conditions in humans could lead to future advancements in medicine and medical technology. For instance, by learning about the ways dogs  smell   a seizure or cancer cells, we can develop technologies to detect those same molecules. Medical   sniffing machines  have already been developed and are providing insight into the smells of disease for disease detection.
RESOURCES:

The Epilepsy Foundation
http://www.efa.org

The National Cancer Institute
http://www.nci.nih.gov

Appendicitis

The appendix is a small outgrowth of tissue forming a tube-shaped sac attached to the lower end of the large intestine. Inflammation of the appendix presents itself in acute and chronic forms and affects both the sexes equally.Appendicitis is when your appendix becomes blocked and inflamed. The appendix is a small pouch attached to your large intestine, whose function is not well known. This disease accounts for about half the acute abdominal emergencies occurring between the ages of ten and thirty.

click to see the pictures

Symptoms:
Pain in centre of abdomen, discomfort in abdomen
Appendicitis usually begins with a sudden pain in the centre of the abdomen. The pain may be preceded by general discomfort in the abdomen, indigestion, diarrhoea, or constipation. Gradually, the pain shifts to the lower right side, and is usually accompanied by a fever varying from 38 oC to 39 oC.

The symptoms of appendicitis vary. It can be hard to diagnosis appendicitis in young children, the elderly, and women of childbearing age.

Typically, the first symptom is pain around your navel. The pain initially may be vague, but becomes increasingly sharp and severe. You may have reduced appetite, nausea, vomiting, and a low-grade fever.

As the inflammation in the appendix increases, the pain tends to move into your right lower abdomen and focuses directly above the appendix at a place called “McBurney’s point.”

If the appendix ruptures, the pain may lessen briefly and you may feel better. However, once peritonitis sets in, the pain worsens and you become sicker.

Abdominal pain may be worse when walking or coughing. You may prefer to lie still because sudden movement causes pain.

Later symptoms include:

Fever
Loss of appetite
Nausea
Vomiting
Constipation
Diarrhea
Chills and shaking

Causes of Appendicitis:
Appendicitis is initiated by the presence of an excessive amount of poisonous waste material in the caecum. As a result, the appendix gets irritated and inflamed. Inflammation and infection are caused by certain germs which are usually present in the intestinal tract.

click to see the picture

click to see the pictue of acute appendicitis

Signs and tests
With appendicitis, pain increases when the abdomen is gently pressed and then the pressure is suddenly released. If peritonitis is present, touching the abdomen may cause a spasm of the abdominal muscles. A rectal examination may identify abdominal or pelvic pain on the right side of your body.

Doctors can usually diagnose appendicitis by your description of the symptoms, the physical exam, and laboratory tests alone. In some cases, additional tests may be needed. These may include:

Abdominal ultrasound
Abdominal CT scan
Diagnostic laparoscopy

Note: In December 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration recalled a drug used during some imaging tests after reports of life-threatening side effects and two deaths. The drug, called NeutroSpec, is used to help diagnose appendicitis in patients ages 5 and older who may have the condition but do not show the usual signs and symptoms.


Modern Treatment:

For uncomplicated cases, a surgical procedure caflled an appendectomy is performed to remove the appendix soon after the diagnosis. An appendectomy can be done as an “open” procedure, where fairly large surgical cuts are made in your abdomen. The surgery can also be done as a laparoscopic procedure, which uses a camera and small incisions.

If the operation reveals that the appendix is normal, the surgeon will remove the appendix and explore the rest of the abdomen for other causes of your pain.

If a CT scan reveals an abscess from a ruptured appendix, the patient may be treated and the appendix removed later, after the infection and inflammation have gone away.

Expectations (prognosis)
If your appendix is treated before it ruptures, you will probably recover rapidly from surgery. If your appendix ruptures before surgery, you will probably recover more slowly, and are more likely to develop an abscess.

Complications
Peritonitis
Abscess
Fistulas
Wound infection

Calling your health care provider
Call your health care provider if you develop abdominal pain in the lower right portion of your belly, or any other symptoms of appendicitis.

Homeopathic Treatment for Appendicitis

Home Remedies for Appendicitis:
Appendicitis treatment using Green Gram
Green gram is a proven home remedy for acute appendicitis. An infusion of green gram is an excellent medicine for treating this condition. It can be taken in a small quantity of one tablespoon three times a day.

Appendicitis treatment using Fenugreek Seeds
Regular use of tea made from fenugreek seeds has proved helpful in preventing the appendix from becoming a dumping ground for excess mucus and intestinal waste. This tea is prepared by putting one tablespoon of the seeds in a litre of cold water and allowing it to simmer for half an hour over a low flame and then strained it. It should be allowed to cool a little before being drunk.

Appendicitis treatment using Vegetable Juices
Certain vegetable juices have been found valuable in appendicitis. A particularly good combination is that of 100 ml each of beet and cucumber juices mixed with 300 ml of carrot juice. This combined juice can be taken twice daily.

Appendicitis treatment using Buttermilk
Buttermilk is beneficial in the treatment of chronic form of appendicitis. One litre of buttermilk may be taken daily for this purpose.

Appendicitis treatment using Whole Wheat
The consumption of whole wheat, which includes bran and wheat germ, has been found beneficial in preventing several digestive disorders, including appendicitis. The bran of wheat can be sterilised by baking after thorough cleaning. This sterilised bran can be added to wheat flour in the proportion of one to six by weight. Two or three chapatis mane from this flour can be eaten daily for preventing this disease.

Appendicitis diet
Fasting and nothing except water
At the first symptoms of severe pain, vomiting, and fever, the patient should resort to fasting and nothing except water should enter the system.

Fruit juices and All-fruit diet
Fruit juices may be given from the third day onwards for the next three days. Thereafter the patient may adopt an all-fruit diet for a further four or five days.

Well-balanced diet
After this tightly regulated regimen, he should adopt a well-balanced diet, consisting of seeds, nuts, grains, vegetables, and fruits.

Other Appendicitis treatments:
Half litre of Warm-water enema
When the first symptoms of pain, vomiting, and fever occur, the patient must be put to bed immediately, as rest is of the utmost importance. A low enema, containing about half a litre of warm water, should be administered once every day for the first three days to cleanse the lower bowel if it can be tolerated with comfort.

Hot compresses and abdominal packs of wet sheet strip
Hot compresses may be placed over the painful area several times daily. Abdominal packs, made of a strip of wet sheet and covered by a dry flannel cloth bound tightly around the abdomen, should be applied continuously until all acute symptoms subside.

Three litres of warm-water enema
When the acute symptoms subside by about the third day, the patient should be given a full enema containing about three litres of warm water, and this should be repeated daily until all inflammation and pain have subsided.

Avoid constipation
In other words, the patient of appendicitis should adopt all measures to eradicate constipation. Once the waste matter in the caecum has moved into the colon and is then eliminated, the irritation and inflammation in the appendix will subside and surgical removal of the appendix may not be necessary.

IT IS ALWAYS ADVICED TO CONSULT A DOCTOR AND TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION FOR ACUTE APPENDICTIS CASES.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.
Sources:www.healthline.com AND www.home-remedies-for-you.com

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