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Herbs & Plants

Artemisia glacialis

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Botanical Name: Artemisia glacialis
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Artemisia
Species:A. glacialis
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asterales
Common Name : Glacier Wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia glacialis is native to C. Europe. It grows on exposed rocky slopes in the Alps. Schistose rocks and screes, 2000 – 3100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia glacialis is a perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.3 m (1ft). The foilages are herbiculas and aeromatic and the plant is deer resistant.

The flower color is yellow & blooms during mid summer.The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Requires a very well-drained light or medium soil and a sunny position. Very intolerant of winter wet. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Indiscriminate collection of this plant from the wild has made it an endangered species. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out[200]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: The herb is used as a flavouring in vermouth and liqueurs.
Medicinal Uses:

Digestive; Expectorant; Sedative; Stomachic.

Glacier wormwood has similar medicinal properties to common wormwood, A, absinthum. It is used locally where it grows wild. The whole plant is digestive, expectorant, sedative and stomachic. An infusion of the herb has a marked effect upon mountain sickness. A poultice of the plant is used as a first-aid remedy in the treatment of wounds.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resours:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_glacialis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+glacialis
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51554/

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Herbs & Plants

Leucophyllum texanum

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Botanical Name : Leucophyllum texanum
Family: Scrophulariaceae
Genus: Leucophyllum
Species:Leucophyllum texanum
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Cycadophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Lamiales

Common Name : Sage, Purple
The Mexican name of this plant, Mr. O. informs us, is pronounced “Sanesa.” This signifies “the tree that is of the color of ashes,” that is to say, silvery gray. The botanical name has ihe same meaning, and is from the color of the leaves. This name will be considered a hard name, and only for the fact that the people who give common names to plants, have not the slightest respect for the writer who trespasses on their prerogative, it might be suggested that ” Silver bush ” would be a good common name for it. ” Silver tree ” will not do, as that is already appropriated by an African tree, Leucadendron ar-genteum.
Habitat : The plant occurs in Philadelphia & southern Texas. As in its native habitat it is found only upon soil so calcareous as to be quite barren, it has been naturally presumed that it would not flourish in the better soils sought by the horticulturists. But experience proves that it will succeed in any good soil that has proper drainage. In fact, soil and culture seem to help it as much as they do any other plant.

Description:
Leucophyllum texanum is a broad-leaved evergreen loose growing, straggling shrubb, never attaining a height of over 6 feet, with leaves even more silvered than the Deodar, with such a profusion of purple flowers at short intervals, during the entire growing season. The shrub is capable of bright effects in ornamental grounds. The flowers of leucophyllum texanum bloom in spring and summer.The bloomed flowers have various sheds like silver, ash etc.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Medicinal Uses: The dried leaves and flowers can be brewed into a pleasant herbal tea that is said to be mildly sedative and good as a bedtime drink or for treating colds and flus.
Other Uses: Like privet, box, or pittosporum, it can be sheared to any desired form and compactness. Also its blooming qualities are not at all impaired by severe shearing. Whether sheared to a globular, pyramidal, conical, or any other form suggested by the fancy, the contrast afforded by this Leucophyllum with the various shades of green, imparts an element of beauty to a landscape, that is but feebly imitated by any other shrub in use. It would make a fine border to a carriage drive.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://chestofbooks.com/gardening-horticulture/Gardener-Monthly-V28/Leucophyllum-Texanum.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/84800/84828/84828_leucophyll_t.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

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Herbs & Plants

Osmunda asiatica

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Botanical Name : Osmunda asiatica
Family: Osmundaceae
Genus: Osmunda
Kingdom:Plantae
Division:Pteridophyta
Class: Polypodiopsida /?Pteridopsida (disputed)
Order: Osmundales

Synonyms : Osmunda cinnamomea var. asiatica

Common Name : Asian cinnamon fern

Habitat :Osmunda asiatica is native to E. AsiaChina, Japan, Korea. It grows on wet places all over Japan.

Description:
Osmunda asiatica is a non flowering plant. Arising from stout underground rhizomes uncurling crosiers, are densely covered in woolly red-brown hairs mixed with blackish ones. To 90 cm tall by 20 cm wide, yellow-green finely divided fronds from tight rosettes. Bearing in their centres one to several shorter and narrower fertile red-brown fertile fronds which soon wither after discharging their spore. Easily grown in a moisture retentive soil with adequate drainage in full to part shade…..CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation:
Likes a soil of swamp mud and loamy or fibrous peat, sand and loam. Succeeds in most moist soils, preferring acid conditions. Requires a constant supply of water, doing well by ponds, streams etc. Plants thrive in full sun so long as there is no shortage of moisture in the soil and also in shady situations beneath shrubs etc. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Spores – they very quickly lose their viability (within 3 days) and are best sown as soon as they are ripe on the surface of a humus-rich sterilized soil in a lightly shaded place in a greenhouse. Keep the compost moist, preferably by putting a plastic bag over the pot. Plants develop very rapidly, pot on small clumps of plantlets as soon as they are large enough to handle and keep humid until they are well established. Do not plant outside until the ferns are at least 2 years old. Cultivars usually come true to type[200]. Division of the rootstock in the dormant season. This is a very strenuous exercise due to the mass of wiry roots.

Medicinal Uses: Not yet known.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity for this species is found, a number of ferns contain carcinogens so some caution is advisable[200]. Many ferns also contain thiaminase, an enzyme that robs the body of its vitamin B complex. In small quantities this enzyme will do no harm to people eating an adequate diet that is rich in vitamin B, though large quantities can cause severe health problems. The enzyme is destroyed by heat or thorough drying, so cooking the plant will remove the thiaminase

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osmunda
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Osmunda+asiatica
https://www.mailorder.crug-farm.co.uk/?pid=11840

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Pyrola asarifolia

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Botanical Name : Pyrola asarifolia
Family: Ericaceae
Subfamily: Monotropoideae
Genus: Pyrola
Species: P. asarifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Common Names: Bog Wintergreen, Liverleaf wintergreen, Pink wintergreen, Pink Pyrola

Habitat : Pyrola asarifolia is native to N. America – Alaska to Newfoundland, south to New York, California and New Mexico.It grows on wet soils of bogs, stream courses and around springs, mostly in shady areas and especially in coniferous woodlands, from the plains to around 2,700 metres in the mountains.

Description:
Pyrola asarifolia is an evergreen Perennial plant, growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in).
It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Jun to July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile….CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Flowers: Raceme of 7 to 15 flowers on slender stalks at the top of the plant. Flowers are ½ to ¾ inch across with 5 round petals, pink or white with pink to pinkish purple edging, the edges often curled down. A cluster of stamens with dark pink to red tips is hidden under the upper petals. The style is light green, curved down and out below the lower petals like an elephant’s trunk.

Leaves and stem:
Leaves are basal, 1 to 1½ inches long, round to kidney shaped, often wider than long, the blade typically shorter than the leaf stalk. The tip may have slight point. The upper surface is very shiny. A few scale like leaves may be present on lower part of the flowering stem.
Cultivation:
Prefers a moist sandy woodland soil in a cool position with partial shade. Requires a peaty or leafy acid soil that remains moist in the summer.  This is a very difficult plant to grow. It requires a mycorrhizal relationship in the soil and therefore needs to be grown initially in soil collected from around an established plant. It is also very difficult from seed as well as being intolerant of root disturbance which makes division difficult. This species is extremely rare and endangered in the wild.
Propagation:
Seed – the only information we have on this species is that it is difficult from seed and germinates infrequently. We would suggest sowing the seed as soon as it is ripe if this is possible. Sow it into soil collected from around an established plant, only just covering the seed, and put the pot in a shady part of a cold frame. Pot up any young seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle, once again using soil from around an established plant. Plant out into their permanent positions when the plants are large enough. You should not need to use soil from around an established plant to do this since the soil in the pot will contain the necessary micorrhiza. Division with great care in the spring. Pot up the divisions using some soil from around an established plant, grow on in a lightly shaded part of a greenhouse or frame and do not plant out until the plants are growing away vigorously.
Medicinal Uses:
This plant was considered to be an effective remedy in the treatment of rheumatism. A decoction of the leaves, or the leaves and roots, has been used as an eyewash for sore eyes. A decoction of the plant has been used to treat the coughing up of blood. A decoction of the root has been used to treat liver complaints.

Other Uses:
Plants can be used as a ground cover when spaced about 30cm apart each way. They are somewhat slow to settle down though, and only form a good cover when they are growing luxuriantly.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrola_asarifolia
https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/pink-pyrola
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pyrola+asarifolia