Tag Archives: Recreation

Penstemon Grandiflorus

Botanical Name:Penstemon grandiflorus
Family : Scrophulariaceae
Genus : Penstemon
Species :  Penstemon grandiflorus Nutt.
Kingdom : Plantae
Subkingdom : Tracheobionta
Superdivision : Spermatophyta
Division:Magnoliophyta
Class : Magnoliopsida
Subclass:  Asteridae
Order : Scrophulariales

Synonyms: Penstemon bradburii

Common Name :Large beardtongue,Showy Beardtongue, Pink Beardtongue, Shell-leaf Beardtongue, Canterbury Bells, and Wild Foxglove.

Habitat : Native to U.S.

Description:
Penstemon grandiflorus is a perennial plant. Large, lavender, horizontally arranged, tubular flowers on a smooth stem above opposite, blue-green, clasping leaves and in axils of similar leafy bracts. This perennial’s stout, unbranched stems, 2-3 ft. tall, bear opposite, blue-green, waxy leaves and pink to bluish-lavender, tubular flowers. The large flowers extend horizontally on short stalks from the axils of leafy bracts near top of stem.

click & see the pictures

This handsome plant is especially spectacular when growing in masses. It occasionally escapes from cultivation in the East. At least 15 species of Penstemon occur in eastern North America, and there are many more in the West.

Cultivation Details:
Large-flowered Beardtongue (Penstemon grandiflorus) prefers full sun to partial shade, dry mesic to dry conditions, and poor soil containing rocky material or sand. When Penstemon grandiflorus is a mature plant it can reach heights of 2-3 ft. Large-flowered Beardtongue has shades of pink to purple flowers and blooms from May to June.

This plant is endangered in some states and is typically rare to see in the wild. Bumblebees like to visit the flowers for nectar and this plant is well liked by birds. Penstemon grandiflorus is one of the showiest of all Penstemons! In the past Native Americans treated toothaches by chewing the root pulp of this plant and then placing it in the cavity. Large-flowered Beardtongue is loved by the hummingbirds and is drought tolerant.

Medicinal Uses:
The Dakota used a decoction of roots to treat chest pains and the Kiowa to treat stomachaches.   The Pawnee used a tea made of the leaves to treat fever and chills. The roots were chewed to a pulp and placed it in a cavity to relieve toothache pain.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/penstemon-grandiflorus-large-flowered-beardtongue/?cat=249
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PEGR7
http://www.prairienursery.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_seed_info&cPath=64_1&products_id=119
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penstemon_grandiflorus

Enhanced by Zemanta

Salvia plebeia

Botanical Name : Salvia plebeia R. Brown
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Salvia
Species: S. plebeia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Scientific names :Salvia plebeia R. Brown ,Salvia brachiata Roxb. ,Salvia parviflora Roxb.
Common names:Mizo-kouiju (Japanese), Li zhi cao (Chin.),Sage weed (Engl.)

Habitat :Salvia plebeia is native to a wide region of Asia. It grows on hillsides, streamsides, and wet fields from sea level to 2,800 m (9,200 ft) As a weed in and about towns in various provinces at low altitudes.

Description:
Salvia plebeia is an annual, hairy herb. Stems are stout, erect, hoary, and 15 to 45 cms in height. Leaves are oblong ovate, 2.5 to 7.5 cms long, and narrowed and pointed at both ends. Spikes are panicled, often fastigiate. Flowers are hardly 6 mm long, lilac or nearly white, occurring in small, very numerous whorls in numerous, slender, panicled, glandular racemes. Calyx is stalked, bell-shaped, and 10 to 12 mm long; the upper calyx-lip is entire, and the lower one obtusely 2-toothed. Corolla-tube is very short, and the included upper lip is short, nearly straight, slightly flattened, and concave. Nutlets are very minute and ellipsoid.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
You may click to see pictures of Salvia plebeia plant :
Constituents:
* Study yielded six compounds: hispidulin-glucoronide, hispidulin-7-O-D-glucoside, 6-methoxy-luteolin-7-glucoside, ß-sitosterol, 2′-hydroxy-5′-methoxybiochanin A and coniferyl aldehyde.

*Study of whole plant yielded: ß-sitosterol, hispidulin, carnosol, rosmadial, ursolic acid, pectolinarigenin, epirosmanol, caffeic acid methyl ester and scopoletin.

Edible Uses:  Flowers and leaves used as condiment.

Properties:-
*Considered astringent, diuretic, vermifuge.
*Antihepatotoxic, antidiarrheal, antispasmodic, analgesic.

Medicinal Uses:

Parts used: Seeds, leaves.

Folkloric
*Seeds are used in gonorrhea and menorrhage.
*In Bombay, used to increase sexual powers.
*In China, used as anti-inflammatory and for treating urinary tract infections.

Studies :-
• Antioxidant: Study yielded six compounds. (See:Constituents) Compounds 3, 4 and 5 ( 6-methoxy-luteolin-7-glucoside, ?-sitosterol, 2?-hydroxy-5?-methoxybiochanin A) showed strong antioxidant activities.
Pharmacologic Activities: Study on pharmacologic activities of Compound Salvia Plebeia Granules (CSPG) long used for treating UTIs showed a dose-related diuretic effect, antipyretic, antiblastic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Results support its folkloric use on treating urinary tract infections.
• Chemical Constituents: Study on whole plant of Salvia plebeia yielded nine compounds: ß-sitosterol, hispidulin, carnosol, rosmadial, ursolic acid, pectolinarigenin, epirosmanol, caffeic acid methyl ester and scopoletin. 8 and 9 were reported for Salvia genus for the first time and 3-7 from S. plebeia for the first time.
New Phenylfutanone Glucoside: Study yielded a new phenylbutanone glucoside, salviaplebeiaside, along with two known phenolic compounds, rosmarinic acid methyl ester and luteolin-7-O-ß-D-glucoside.
• Hepatoprotective: Study evaluated the hepatoprotective effects of “Chhit-Chan-Than,” a Taiwan herbal remedy believed to have anti-inflammatory and detoxification activities, and used in the treatment of hepatitis. The crude extracts of the three herbal components – Salvia plebeia, O gratissimum and O basilicum – were studied. Results showed that S. plebeia was the most potent of the three crude extracts, protecting the liver against CCl4-intoxication and D-GaIN-induced hepatotoxicity.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.stuartxchange.com/SageWeed.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_plebeia
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/520091/Salvia
http://www.asianflora.com/Lamiaceae/Salvia-plebeia.htm

A Half-Step Handstand

If you’ve always wanted to do a handstand but can’t get in the correct position and hold your balance, try practicing half a handstand at the wall. Over time, it will help you develop the necessary strength in your shoulders and core so you can do a full handstand.

CLICK & SEE

Lean forward and place your hands on the floor, shoulder-width apart, fingers facing forward.
Stand about 3 feet away from a flat wall, then turn to face away from the wall. Lean forward and place your hands on the floor, shoulder-width apart, fingers facing forward. Slowly shift your weight over your hands and walk your right leg up on the wall.

Next, raise your left foot and walk it up the wall until you have both feet flat on the wall at hip level. Adjust the height of your feet and the position of your arms so your body forms a 90-degree angle. (It may take a few tries to get this right.) Once you’re in the right angle, think of pushing the floor away with your hands. This keeps your shoulders moving away from your ears. Pull in and brace with your abdmonial muclses to avoid sagging into your lower back. Hold this position for up to one minute. To come out of the pose, walk your feet down the wall, bend your knees and stand up.


Source
: The Losangles Times

Enhanced by Zemanta

Affirming an Abundant Future

Squirrel Medicine
Native Americans considered all living beings as brothers and sisters that had much to teach including squirrels. These small creatures taught them to work in harmony with the cycles of nature by conserving for the winter months during times when food was plentiful. In our modern world, squirrels remind us to set aside a portion of our most precious resources as an investment in the future. Though food and money certainly fall into this category, they are only some of the ways our energy is manifested. We can conserve this most valuable asset by being aware of the choices we make and choosing only those that nurture and sustain us. This extends to the natural resources of our planet as well, using what we need wisely with the future in mind.

Saving and conservation are not acts of fear but rather affirmations of abundance yet to come. Squirrels accept life’s cycles, allowing them to face winters with the faith that spring will come again. Knowing that change is part of life, we can create a safe space, both spiritually and physically, that will support us in the present and sustain us in the future. This means not filling our space with things, or thoughts, that don’t serve us. Without hoarding more than we need, we keep ourselves in the cyclical flow of life when we donate our unwanted items to someone who can use them best. This allows for more abundance to enter our lives, because even squirrels know a life of abundance involves more than just survival.

Squirrels use their quick, nervous energy to enjoy life’s adventure. They are great communicators, and by helping each other watch for danger, they do not allow worry to drain them. Instead, they allow their curious nature to lead the way, staying alert to opportunities and learning as they play. Following the example set by our squirrel friends, we are reminded to enjoy the journey of life’s cycles as we plan and prepare for a wonderful future, taking time to learn and play along the way.

Source:Daily Om

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Greeting the Divine Spirit


Bowing

Bowing is a universal gesture of respect and reverence. In many cultures, it is the predominant form of social greeting, and most religions incorporate it into their rituals of worship. In many cases, bowing signifies not only respect but also an acknowledgment of the shared divinity between the bower and the recipient. Bowing can also be a turning in toward our own divinity when we bow our heads in prayer, contemplation, or meditation. Bows range in form from a slight forward nod of the head to a full body prostration on the ground, and range in meaning from a simple greeting to a complete giving over of the self to the divine.

If you have ever bowed or been on the receiving end of a bow, you know that it is different from a handshake or a hug. Bowing has the quality of consciously evoking spirit and conveys a sense of reverence for the people involved. The word “Namaste,” which accompanies bowing in yoga, actually translates as “The divine spirit in me acknowledges the divine spirit in you.” When we greet one another with this kind of awareness, we can’t help but be more conscious that we are deeply connected to one another and to everyone, because this divine spirit resides in all of us.

There are simple bows and complicated bows, and subtle variations carry different meanings depending upon where you are, who you are, and a number of other factors. But we can all practice bowing by simply bringing our two hands together in prayer and pressing the thumb side of our hands lightly into our chests. Keeping a long spine, simply bend your head gently down so that you are looking at the tops of your fingers. Close your eyes and breathe consciously, paying homage to your spirit, the same spirit that resides within all of humanity.

Sources
: Daily Om

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]