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Red Meat Dos and Don’ts

Roast beef
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* Keep your red meat consumption to 18 ounces per week or less. A handy yardstick: A typical 3-ounce serving of red meat is about the size of a computer mouse.

* Choose leaner cuts of meat, such as top sirloin beef, and trim excess fat.

* Serve meat as a side dish instead of an entree.

* Replace red meat with other protein sources, such as poultry, fish, beans or nuts.

* Use lower-temperature cooking methods such as stewing.

* If you grill, keep meat away from the coals or use a gas grill and don’t overcook.

* Women in reproductive years who eat little meat should take a multivitamin with iron to reduce the risk of iron deficiency.

Sources: Los Angles Times

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