Tag Archives: Risk

Statins May Raise Stroke Risk in Some

People who have had a type of stroke caused by bleeding in the brain should avoid taking cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, U.S. researchers said
. The drugs increase the risk of a second stroke in these patients.

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It was especially true of people who had strokes in one of their brain’s four lobes, which have a greater chance of recurrence than strokes that occur deep in the brain.

People who have a stroke in one of their lobes have a 22 percent risk of a second stroke when they take statins, compared with a 14 percent risk among those not taking a statin.

According to Reuters:
“The researchers said it is not clear how statins increase the bleeding risk in these patients. It may be having low cholesterol increases the risk of bleeding in the brain, or it may be that statins affect clotting factors in the blood that increase the risk of a brain hemorrhage in these patients.”


Resources:

Reuters January 10, 2011
Archives of Neurology January 10, 2011

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Some Health Quaries & Answers

Sensitive to sunlight :-…..CLICK & SEE

Q: I develop blotchy red patches on my arms and face which tingle and burn within 10 minutes of exposure to the sun.

A: Some people are inherently sensitive to sunlight, while others develop the problem as a reaction to medication like tetracyclines, sulpha drugs or even common painkillers and anti histamines. If you are on medication, consult your doctor about changing or stopping it.

In any case, try to avoid exposure to sunlight by leaving early to work and returning after sunset. Use a black umbrella to block the sun’s rays whenever you go out. Wear long sleeved, dark coloured clothing and covered footwear. For the exposed areas like the face, neck and hands, apply a sunscreen with an SF (sun filter) factor of 15 or more.

Prostate surgery :-….CLICK & SEE
Q: I had prostrate surgery two years ago, after which I developed erectile dysfunction. It persists, causing me great anguish.

A: About 80-90 per cent men have erectile dysfunction after prostatectomy. It is usually temporary and one recovers in 12-18 months. A small percentage does have a long-term problem, especially if the surgery is for cancer. That’s because the nerves in the area may have been cut during the operation. Consult the urologist who performed the surgery and discuss your options.

Corns on feet :-…CLICK & SEE
Q: There are two corns on the sole of my foot, which are very painful. What should I do?

A: A corn is actually a thickened area of skin which develops because of uneven pressure. The commonest causes are faulty gait or ill-fitting footwear. But first confirm the diagnosis by consulting a dermatologist. A bony swelling, wart or abscess may appear like a corn to the untrained eye. If the swellings are really corns, you may use corn plasters to remove them. Follow the instructions on the packet. Corn plasters shouldn’t be used if you have diabetes; the corns will recur unless the causative factor is treated.

Burning skin :-
Q: I have lumbar spondylosis. Whenever I sit in the office or watch TV, I feel an uncomfortable burning sensation on the skin along the right side of my abdomen. It disappears upon moving.

A: Sometimes nerves leading to the skin become trapped as they leave the vertebral column. The pressure on the nerve causes it to tingle and burn, producing the uncomfortable sensation you mentioned. The abnormal curvature of your spine owing to the spondylosis is probably responsible. First, try conservative treatment with —

Weight reduction, if obese

Spinal exercises. These can be learnt from a physiotherapist or yoga teacher

• Learning proper postures

• Walking for 40 minutes a day.

Usually there is an improvement in three months which can be sustained if the lifestyle modifications are continued. If there is no improvement and the symptoms are incapacitating, you might need to consider surgery to correct the spinal deformity.

Anal fissure :-….CLICK & SEE
Q: I have had chronic anal fissure for the last six months. Every time I go to the toilet, I experience severe pain. An ayurvedic physician has guaranteed a cure but insists I allow him to perform surgery first.

A: A fissure occurs usually as a result of straining and then passing a hard stool. It is difficult to heal as the pain causes a spasm in the anal sphincter perpetuating the cycle of straining and constipation.

Conservative treatment with a sitz bath (sitting in a basin of hot water), applying a local anaesthetic cream (xylocaine, lignocaine) before and after passing stool, drinking four litres of water a day, eating a high-fibre diet, and using a stool bulking agent like isapgol cures the problem in 90 per cent of cases.

If the difficulty persists, consult a qualified surgeon who can perform an anal dilation or actually cut the anal sphincter. This has to be done carefully as otherwise you may not be able to control your bowel movement. I do not think an ayurvedic physician is licensed or qualified to perform the surgery.

Small big query :-
Q: I am an 18-year-old man and would like to know what type of underwear I should use.

A: You have to make a choice depending on your comfort level. Underwear that is too tight may cause chaffing of the groin area. This can lead to secondary bacterial or fungal infection. It can also raise the temperature of the testicles, which can marginally lower your sperm count. Boxer shorts are most comfortable. But ensure it is made of a natural fibre.

Source: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

 

Will It Kill You? New Charts Tell You the Odds

A 55-year-old man who smokes is as likely to die in the next 10 years as a 65-year-old who has never smoked. Less than 1 woman in 1,000 younger than 50 will die in the next decade from cervical cancer.

……….

New risk charts in a paper published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute provide a broader perspective than most of the risk calculators on the Internet. They cover the risks for 10 different causes of death, and for all causes combined, while differentiating by age and between smokers, nonsmokers and former smokers.

People are often presented with statistics intended to frighten them about a particular disease. But a disease may present a large risk to some and very little to others. These charts can allow you to find out what your own odds really are.

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People with Migraine Prone to Clotting

People with migraines are more likely to develop blood clots in their veins, a study has suggested….CLICK & SEE

The research, published in the latest issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, found that those suffering from migraines may be more likely to develop blood clots in their veins.

In the condition, called venous thrombosis or thromboembolism, blood clots form in a vein, which can limit blood flow and cause swelling and pain. Those clots can then dislodge from the vein and travel to the heart and the lungs, which can be fatal.

The study examined 574 people in Italy age 55 and up to determine whether they had a history of migraine or migraine at the time of the evaluation. The doctors also reviewed their medical records for cases of venous thrombosis.

The Science Daily online reported that of the participants, 111 people had migraine. A total of 21 people with migraine also had one or more instances of venous thrombosis. In comparison, 35 people without migraine had the condition.

Though researchers were unable to pinpoint the reason for the link between migraine and venous thrombosis, a theory is that the blood of people with migraine may be more prone to clotting, the report said.

It was also found that people with migraine are not more likely to have hardening or narrowing of the arteries, which is contrary to a current theory.

“The thinking has been that because people with migraine are more likely to have strokes and other cardiovascular problems, that they would also have more severe and early atherosclerosis,” said study author Stefan Kiechl, of Innsbruck Medical University in Austria. He said the study provides solid evidence to refute it.

Sources: The Times Of India

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Insights: In a Man’s Offspring, a Clue to Prostate Cancer

Men who have only daughters may be at greater risk for prostate cancer than those who have at least one son, a new study reports, and the reason may be an alteration in the Y chromosome, the male sex chromosome.

Prostate Cancer in Fathers With Fewer Male Offspring: the Jerusalem Perinatal Study Cohort (Journal of the National Cancer Insitute)Researchers recorded the sex of the offspring of 38,934 Israeli men who had children from 1964 to 1976, and then followed the fathers through 2005, during which time 712 developed prostate cancer. After adjusting for other variables, they found that those with no sons were almost one and a half times as likely to have developed the disease as those with at least one son. The more daughters they had without having any sons, the more their risk increased.

Because the inability to produce male children is associated with alterations in the Y chromosome, this suggests that the chromosome may be involved in prostate cancer risk.
Still, said Dr. Susan Harlap, the lead author and a professor of clinical epidemiology at Columbia,  The main reason a man has male or female children, even in runs of one sex, is chance. She said she did not recommend extra prostate screening for men with only daughters.

The researchers acknowledge that their study, published Jan. 3 in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, gathered no information about family history of prostate cancer. In addition, they studied a specific group of men, and it may not be possible to generalize the results to other populations.

Prostate cancer is a huge mystery,  Dr. Harlap said, not like lung or colon cancer, where we have a pretty good idea about causes. Our study gives a hint to look at the Y chromosome, and maybe the X chromosome, too, while you  are at it.

Source:The New York Times