Categories
News on Health & Science

Dark chocolate ‘not so healthy’

[amazon_link asins=’B01DZNDF6O,B00DILE11W,B00VVRD6S4,B00166D8TW,B01NBYHLIK,B00VVRD75Q,B00BOJ7Z5E,B00VZB1IJU,B00ZCQK0N4′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’517260d2-defa-11e7-b575-7f26e94f4162′]

For those of you tucking into dark chocolate this Christmas using the excuse it is good for you, think again.

Studies have suggested dark chocolate is good for the heart

CLICK & SEE

A top medical journal said any health claims about plain chocolate may be misleading.

Plain chocolate is naturally rich in flavanols, plant chemicals that are believed to protect the heart.

But an editorial in the Lancet points out that many manufacturers remove flavanols because of their bitter taste.

Instead, many products may just be abundant in fat and sugar – both of which are harmful to the heart and arteries, the journal reported.

Previous studies have suggested that plain chocolate can help protect the heart, lower blood pressure and aid tiredness.

But the Lancet said: “Dark chocolate can be deceptive.

When chocolate manufacturers make confectionery, the natural cocoa solids can be darkened and the flavanols, which are bitter, removed, so even a dark-looking chocolate can have no flavanol.

“Consumers are also kept in the dark about the flavanol content of chocolate because manufacturers rarely label their products with this information.”

And the journal also pointed out that even with flavanols present, chocolate-lovers should be mindful of the other contents.

“The devil in the dark chocolate is the fat, sugar and calories it also contains.

“To gain any health benefit, those who eat a moderate amount of flavanol-rich dark chocolate will have to balance the calories by reducing their intake of other foods – a tricky job for even the most ardent calorie counter.

“So, with the holiday season upon us, it might be worth getting familiar with the calories in a bar of dark chocolate versus a mince pie and having a calculator at hand.”

Click to see:-
Chocolate ‘lowers’ blood pressure
03 Jul ’07 |BBC NEWS , Health

Chocolate ‘cuts blood clot risk’
15 Nov ’06 |BBC NEWS , Health

Chocolate trial on heart patients
10 Apr ’06 |BBC NEWS , Health

Chocolate ‘has health benefits’
22 Mar ’05 |BBC NEWS , Health

Chocolate may cut heart disease
20 Dec 05 | BBC NEWS, Health

Dark chocolate may be healthier
27 Aug 03 |BBC NEWS, Health

Chocolate ‘is good for you’
06 Aug 99 |BBC NEWS, Health

Sources: BBC NEWS ,25th. Dec’07

Categories
Exercise Yoga

Learn Healthy Breathing

The Right Breath
click  & See
You already know how to breathe, right? You do it every moment, every day, without even thinking about. Chances are, though, your breathing technique is not as healthy as you might think.

Most of us breathe too shallowly, too quickly. Our lungs and heart would greatly prefer longer, slower, deeper breaths. This is true for general health, and it is also true for managing stress. Deep breathing helps dissipate the fight-or-flight reaction so many of us experience when we’re stressed. It sends a signal to your brain to slow down, which results in hormonal and physiological changes that slow heart rate and lower blood pressure.

You might be surprised that there are lots of big books written on breathing method. That’s because proper breathing technique is crucial for everyone from athletes to people with asthma to yoga experts. But for us regular folk, there are only a few things you need to keep in mind:

1.In general, inhale slowly and deeply through the nose. A healthy inhale takes about five seconds.

2.In general, exhale slowly through the mouth. Empty your lungs completely. Good breathers focus more on thorough exhalation than on inhalation.

Engage your diaphragm for good breathing. The diaphragm is the sheet of muscle along the top of your abdomen that pulls your lungs down to draw in air, and then pushes your lungs up to expel carbon dioxide. With a good inhalation, your lungs puff up as your diaphragm drops. With a good exhale, your diaphragm rises. If you don’t feel this muscle moving, deepen your breaths even more.

Work toward breathing just six or eight deep breaths per minute. Most of us breathe more than 20 times a minute.

Breathe Away Anxiety
Proper breathing is particularly important during moments of great anxiety. At times like these, many people resort to chest breathing — the type of big, desperate inhales and exhales that make you rapidly puff up and deflate your chest, says Michael Crabtree, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania, and a licensed clinical psychologist.

To regain healthy breathing during periods of anxiety, he says, lie on the floor and place your hand on your chest. Using your hand as a gauge, try to reduce the amount of chest movement, while continuing to breathe normally. You don’t want your chest to move; you want the other parts of your body to take over the breathing — using your diaphragm instead of the big chest inhales and exhales. Do this for five minutes.

Be aware that chest breathing still has a purpose, but only in times of extreme emotional arousal or physical challenge. “Most Americans use chest breathing because of developing instincts from fight-or-flight conditions,” he says. It is in those types of physically dangerous situations that it is still necessary — not for everyday stress or anxiety. Proper breathing is particularly important during moments of great anxiety. At times like these, many people resort to chest breathing — the type of big, desperate inhales and exhales that make you rapidly puff up and deflate your chest, says Michael Crabtree, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania, and a licensed clinical psychologist.
From : Stealth Health.