Tag Archives: South India

Thespesia populnea

Botanical Name : Thespesia populnea
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thespesia
Species: T. populnea
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Malvales

Alternative Botanical Names: Hibiscus populneus

Common Names:  Commonly known as the Portia Tree.  Indian Tulip Tree, Pacific Rosewood, Seaside Mahoe (in Florida), Surina (the “elegant tree”), Suriya (Sinhala), Bebaru or Baru baru (Malay), Milo or Miro (in many Polynesian languages), Mako?i (Rapanui), Gangaraavi (Telugu), Poovarasu: (Tamil), Poovarasu: (Malayalam), PakuR (Bengali) and Plaksa (Sanskrit).

Habitat: Thespesia populnea is probably indigenous to Hawai’i, but it may have been introduced by the early Polynesians. It is found throughout the tropics in coastal areas. In Hawai’i, it has been documented on all the main islands except Kaho’olawe at elevations ranging from sea level to 900 feet. (Wagner 1990) .However, the Portia Tree is probably native only to the Old World, and may have originated in India.
Description :
Thespesia populnea is species of flowering plant. It is a small tree or arborescent shrub that has a pantropical distribution, found on coasts around the world.The Portia Tree reaches a height of 6–10 m (20–33 ft) tall and a trunk diameter of 20–30 cm (7.9–12 in). It grows at elevations from sea level to 275 m (902 ft) in areas that receive 500–1,600 mm (20–63 in) of annual rainfall. The Portia Tree is able to grow in the wide range of soil types that may be present in coastal environments, including soils derived from quartz (sand), limestone, and basalt; it favors neutral soils (pH of 6-7.4).

Bark: Brown, corrugated. Scaly twigs.

Leaves: Heart-shaped, shiny green, usually ranging in size from 5 cm to 20 cm (2 to 8 inches) long.

Flowers: The cup-shaped hibiscus-like pale yellow flowers are 5 to 8 cm (2 to 3 inches), with a dark blotch at the base of the petals . They last for one to two days, turning maroon and then dropping. They are produced intermittently throughout the year in warm climates.

You may click to see the pictures

Fruits and seeds: Capsule is a flattened indehiscent leathery sphere. The grayish brown seeds, 0.7 to 1.2 cm long (1/4 to 1/2 inch). Both the capsules and the hard seeds are buoyant and can be dispersed to very long distances by sea water

You may click to see the pictures: ..>     Indian Tulip Tree :

Leaves & flowers (1)  :

Leaves & flower (2)  :

Cultivation & Propagation:
It grows at elevations from sea level to 275 m (902 ft) in areas that receive 500–1,600 mm (20–63 in) of annual rainfall.[2] The Portia Tree is able to grow in the wide range of soil types that may be present in coastal environments, including soils derived from quartz (sand), limestone, and basalt; it favors neutral soils (pH of 6-7.4)

The plant is propagated by seeds. The leathery seed capsules of Thespesia populnea are spherical and 1 to 2 inches in diameter. The grayish brown seeds are 1/4 to 1/2 inch long. The capsules generally open at maturity releasing about eight seeds. The capsules can also be opened by hand and the seeds removed.

The seeds should be scarified (the seed coat penetrated). This can be done using sandpaper, nail clippers, or by cracking with a hammer. Care must be taken to avoid damaging the inner part of the seed. The seeds do not require soaking. The seeds should be planted in sterile potting mix at a depth of about twice the diameter of the seed. Germination takes 14 to 28 days. (NTBG 1996; Wagner 1990)

Edible Uses :
The leaf and flower buds are said to be edible raw or cooked. The seeds are applied to scabies and other skin diseases, and are rubbed on swollen joints.

Medicinal Uses:
The yellowish juice extracted from young fruits is used to treat insect bites, gonorrhoea, ringworm, and migraine headache , and is also used for fistula, psoriasis, scabies, sprains, and wart removal:
(http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/dictionary/tico/t.html)

Bioassay test results showed that extracts of fruits and flowers of T. populnea distinctly inhibited the growth of two bacteria:
(http://www.jusir.org/issues/0112/01-xx/jusir_2_20_24.pdf)

Traditional medicinal uses: Ground up bark is used to treat skin diseases (India), dysentery and haemorrhoids (Mauritius). Leaves are applied to inflamed and swollen joints (South India). When cut, the young fruit secretes a yellow sticky sap used to treat ringworm and other skin diseases (South India). Roots are used as a tonic. There is some modern investigation of the plant’s effects on high blood pressure:
http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/plants/portia.htm

The roots are used as a tonic… Kirtikar and Basu report that in Mauritius the bark is described as depurative, and as a cure for dysentery and haemorrhoids. Nadkarni says that a decoction of the bark is used for washing skin diseases. Ground bark mixed with coconut oil is also applied to skin diseases… leaves are applied to inflamed and swollen joints. The fruit abounds in a viscid, yellow juice which the natives in South India use as an external application in psoriasis. Many other uses are listed at:
(http://www.hindunet.org/saraswati/Indian%20Lexicon/thespesia.htm)

Other Uses:
The heartwood of the Portia Tree is dark reddish brown to chocolate brown and has a specific gravity of 0.55 to 0.89.[2] It is used to make the thavil, a Carnatic musical instrument of South India. Milo is popular in Hawaii for woodworking (commonly turned into bowls) because of the range of colors expressed (tan, through yellow, to red). Traditionally it was planted in sacred groves and used for religious sculpture throughout eastern Polynesia. In Tahiti, Milo wood is used in the making of the to’ere (slotted wooden drum), used in traditional Tahitian tribal drumming. Mako?i was used for the rongorongo tablets of Easter Island. Since the advent of aluminium-hulled boats in the 20th century, Pitcairners have made regular trips to Henderson Island to harvest miro wood. Usually they only venture to Henderson only once per year, but may make up to three trips if the weather is favorable. Pitcairners carve the wood into curios, from which they derive much of their income. The flower of the Portia Tree played a part in Sri Lanka‘s independence struggle, when it was sold on Remembrance Day by the Suriya-Mal Movement instead of the poppy to aid indigenous ex-servicemen.

The plant also produces rope and dye and is used as a shade tree and as a windbreak.

Fibres, mats, paper and tapa cloth are products of Thespesia populnea:
http://www.aims.gov.au/pages/research/mangroves/mangrove-uses.html

The bark was used for cordage fiber. The tree also yields tannin, dye, oil, medicine and gum, from various parts of the plant. The wood was skillfully crafted into bowls and into plates, too. The wood is flavorless, because it is lacking in any unpleasant-tasting sap that could contaminate stored food. The wood has an attractive grain that takes to a high polish and, in addition to food utensils and containers, was fashioned into paddles and other carved objects, as well as for an occasional canoe:
http://www.hawaii-nation.org/canoe/milo.html

Wood used for food containers, slit drums and cabinetry:
http://web.hawcc.hawaii.edu/hawcc/fstone/biol156_Handouts.htm

 

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thespesia_populnea
http://www.ask.com/wiki/Thespesia_populnea?o=3986&qsrc=999
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~eherring/hawnprop/the-popu.htm
http://www.hibiscus.org/species/tpopulnea.php

Polianthes tuberosa (Rajoni-Gandha)

Polianthes tuberosa. Dijual 5000 per ikat.

Polianthes tuberosa. Dijual 5000 per ikat. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Botanical Name :Polianthes tuberosa
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Genus: Polianthes
Species: P. tuberosa
Kingdom: Plantae
clade: Angiosperms
clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Common Name :The common name derives from the Latin tuberosa, meaning swollen or tuberous in reference to its root system. It consists of about 12 species. Polianthes means “many flowers” in Greek language.

The Aztecs called the tuberose omixochitl [oh-mi-shoh’-chit?] or bone flower (though this name also refers to Polianthes mexicana).

It is a prominent plant in Indian culture and mythology. The flowers are used in wedding ceremonies, garlands, decoration and various traditional rituals. Its Hindi name is “Rajnigandha“, though it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as “Raat ki Rani” (“Queen of the Night”), which is really Cestrum nocturnum. The name Rajnigandha means “night-fragrant” (rajni=night gandha=fragrance). In Bengali, it is called “Rajoni-Gandha”, meaning “Scent of the Night“. In Marathi, it is called “NishiGhanda”.

In parts of South India, it is known as “Sugandaraja“, which translates to “king of fragrance/smell”. In Chinese, it is called WanXiangYu  (“night fragrant jade”, meaning “flower as precious as jade and becoming fragrant at night), or YeLaiXiang  (“fragrance that comes at night”) or YueXiaXiang  ( “fragrance under the moon”). In Indonesia it is called “bunga sedap malam”, meaning night fragrant flower. In Tamil Nadu it is called as Sambangi or nilasambangi, in Andhra Pradesh it is called as “NelaSampenga” and traditionally used in all type of garlanding especially in south Indian marriages. In Cuba it is called “azucena” which is the name given to amaryllis in Mexico.   In Bengal it is called Rajoni-Gandha and this flower is  a must in marriages.(the newly married couple’s bed is decorated with this flower)

In Iran the tuberose is known as “Gole Maryam” (“Mary flower”) and the oil extracted from the flower is used as a perfume.

Habitat: Native to Tropical countries.

Description:
The tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is a perennial plant related to the agaves, extracts of which are used as a middle note in perfumery.
click to see the pictures………...(01)...(1)..….(2)..(3)…....(4)....……
Bulb growing to 1m by 0.15m.
It is hardy to zone 9 and is frost tender. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)
The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
Requires a warm sheltered position and a well-drained soil. When grown in pots it is best to use a fibrous loam enriched with compost and some silver sand for drainage. Plants require copious amounts of moisture when starting into growth. Not very hardy outdoors in Britain, this species is often grown in the greenhouse where it can be induced to flower at almost any time of the year. It can also be grown outdoors in warm areas of Britain, planting out the bulbs in spring, harvesting them in the autumn and storing them in sand overwinter in a cool but frost-free place. This species is sometimes cultivated for its edible flowers. They are very strongly scented. The flowers are perhaps the most powerfully scented of all flowers. The perfume is almost intoxicating, especially when the plant is grown in gentle heat when it is heavy and sickly almost to the point of unpleasantness. A double-flowered cultivar, ‘The Pearl’ has an even more pronounced fragrance. The plant is cultivated for its essential oil in China.

Propagation:
Seed – we have no information on this species but suggest sowing the seed in spring in a sunny position in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division of offsets after the plant has finished flowering in late summer.

Medicinal Uses:
You may click to see Health Benefits of Tuberose Essential Oil :

Other Uses:
Essential.

An essential oil is obtained from the flowers. It is used in high grade perfumery. 1150kg of flowers yield 1kg absolute essential oil.

Scented Plants
Flowers: Fresh
The flowers are perhaps the most powerfully scented of all flowers. The perfume is almost intoxicating, especially when the plant is grown in gentle heat

The tuberose is also used traditionally in Hawaii to create leis and was considered a funeral flower in Victorian times. Its scent is described as a complex, exotic, sweet, floral.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuberose
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Polianthes+tuberosa
http://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=1730
http://www.rareflora.com/polianthestubsin.html

Canscora decussata


Botanical Name: Canscora decussata
Family: Gentianaceae
Other Names: Kambumalini, Sankaphuli, Sankh Pushpi, Samkhapushpi, Shankhini
Vernacular names:
Bengali : dankuni
Hindi : kalameg, samkhaphuli, sankhahuli, shankhahuli, shankhini, sankhaphuli
Kannada : shankapushpa, shankha pushpa
Malayalam : kancankora, samkhapuspi, sankhupuspam
Marathi: titavi, yavotchi
Sanskrit: akshapida, danakuni, dandotpala, dridhapada, kambumalinee, kambupushpi, mahatikta, maheshvari, nakuli, netramila, patratanduli, sanhkapuspi, sankhapuspi, sankhini, shankhapushpi, shankhini, sukshmapushpi, tikta, tiktayava, tunduli, visarpini, yashasvini, yavatikta, yavi
Tamil: tantorpalam
Telugu: chitti akchinata
Urdu : sankha holi, sankhaphuli

Habitat : The plant is indigenous to Burma and India.This species is globally distributed in Tropical Africa, Indian Subcontinent and South East Asia. Within India, it is commonly distributed throughout on damp, grassy localities, fields and sal-forests, ascending up to an altitude of 1600 m. in the Himalayas and upto an altitude of 900 m. in Peninsular India.

Description:
A small erect annual herb grows up to 50 cm in height. Leaves simple ovate-lanceolate, acute; flowers white in terminal cymes, fruits membranous capsules, containing powder like seeds. 

click & see the pictures

Medicinal Uses:
Parts Used:: Each plant’s part, but primarily the juice, is applied in herbal medicine
Used In Ayurveda, Sidha and Unani

The herb is known to boost metabolic rates and treat nervous disorders

The range of conditions in which the herb is applied includes: scrofula, nervous debility, insanity, and epilepsy.

Sankh Pushpi is thought to be effective in treating nervous disorders, like brain conditions and other, providing better and longer memory, in addition being a metabolic booster. Herbal medications produced from the plant are known to improve memory.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://enchantingkerala.org/ayurveda/ayurvedic-medicinal-plants/sankhapushpi.php
http://www.oshims.com/herb-directory/s/sankh-pushpi
http://envis.frlht.org.in/botanical_search.php?txtbtname=Canscora+decussata+&gesp=425%7CCanscora+decussata+SCHULTES+%26+SCHULTES.F.

http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp

Enhanced by Zemanta

Baliospermum montanum

Botanical Name : Baliospermum montanum (WILLD.) MUELL.-ARG.
Family :        Euphorbiaceae
Common Name : Danti, Dantika, Rachani, Vishodhini, Lowly marketing nut.

Vernacular names in different languages:
Arabic : habbussalatine-sahrai, habbussalatine-barri
Garo : phan-thap
Hindi: danti, hakum, hakun, dante, dantt, jangli jamalghota
Kannada:  danti, kaduharalu, dantika, kaadu haralu, naaga danti, danthi, naagadanthi
Malayalam : danti, dantika, katalavanakku, nagadanti, nakadanti, nervalam, niratimuttu
Marathi : danti, buktumbo
Oriya :  dumajoda
Persian :  bedanjire khatai
Sanskrit:  anukheti, anukula, artagala, bhadra, danti, dantika, erandapatri, erandaphala, gunapriya, jayapala, kakubha, kumbhachitra, kumbhi, kurantaka, madhupushpa, makulaka, makunaka, mukulaka, nagadanti, nagasphota, nepala, nikumba, nikumbha, nikumbhah, nikumbhi, nishalya, nishkumbha, pratyakparni, pratyaksreni, raktadanti, rechani, ruksha, shighra, shwetaghanta, shyenaghanta, sighra, taruni, udumbaraparni, varahangi, vishalya, vishodhini, a, upachitra, upakulya
Tamil : kattamanakku, nirettimuttu, nakatanti, niradimuttu, peyamanakku, cimai amanakku, nir adimuttu, appaiccevakacceti, appaiccevakam, cimaiyamanakku@, ilantanamanakku, irancani1, kanniyucari, kanniyucaricceti, kattamanakku2, kumpam2, maniyamanakku 2, maniyamanakkucceti, nirvetti2, parankiyamanakku 2, tanti3, timpalai, turuvati, nepalam2, niratimuttu2
Telugu : ettadundiga, kanakapata, kondamudamu, nelajidi, kanaka pata, nela jidi, erradundiga, kanakapaata, neelajidi
Tibetan : da nti, da-nti

Habitat : This species in globally distributed in Indo-Malesia. Within India, it is distributed throughout from Kashmir eastwards to Meghalaya, up to an elevation of 1000 m. and southwards into Peninsular India, ascending to an altitude of 1800 m. in the Western Ghats.

Description:A perennial and woody undershrub grows up to 1.5 meters in height. Leaves simple, sinuate-toothed, upper ones small, lower ones are large, flowers are numerous, in axillary recemes with male flowers above and female below. Fruits capsule, 12 mm long, obovoid, seeds ellipsoid and smooth.

You may click to see the pictures

Medicinal Uses:
Plant pacifies vitiated vata, dropsy, constipation, flatulence, jaundice, hemorrhoids, skin diseases, calculi, wounds, splenomeg

The root, leaves, seed and seed oil is used in the form of powder, seed and oil to treat piles, anaemia, jaundice, skin diseases, cyst, as purgative, wound and conjunctivitis.Piles(arasa):Leaves of trivrt(ipomoea turpethum), danti(Baliospermum montanum), cangeri(oxalis corniculata) and citraka(Plumbago indica) fried in oil and ghee (mixed) and added with fatty layer of curd should be given as vegetable (10-15 gms) (CS.Ci.14.122).Skin diseases (Kustha)Danti (Baliospermum montanum), trivrt (ipomoea turpethum)and brahmi (Bacopa monnieri) powder together should be taken with honey and ghee. It is beneficial for skin diseases, diabetes and numbness (10-15 gms) (AH.Ci.19.34)

The seeds of Baliospermum montanum are described as drastic. Like croton seeds they are boiled in milk before use. The root of the plant is considered cathartic. Both are much used in diseases where purgatives are indicated. The following are a few examples of prescriptions containing these medicines.

Naracha rasa.1 Take of mercury, borax and black pepper, one part each, sulphur, ginger and long pepper two parts each, seeds of Baliospermum montanum nine parts; powder the ingredients and make into two-grain pills with water. These are given in constipation and tympanites.

Danti haritaki.2 Take twenty-five large chebulic myrobalans and enclose them in a piece of cloth; then take of the roots of Baliospermum montanum and Ipomosa Turpethum (trivrit), each two hundred tolas, water sixty-four seers, boil them together till the water is reduced to eight seers. Strain the decoction, take out the chebulic myrobalans and fry them in thirty-two tolas of sesa-mum oil. To the strained decoction add two hundred tolas of old treacle; then boil till reduced to the proper consistence for a confection. Now add to the mass the following substances, namely powdered root of Ipomcea Turpethum (trivrit) thirty-two tol?s, long pepper and ginger, each eight tolas, and stir them well; when cool add thirty-two tolas of honey, cinnamon, cardamom, leaves called tejapatra, and the flowers of Mesua ferrea (nagakesara) each eight tolas, and prepare a confection. The chebulic myrobalans should be kept imbedded in the medicine. Two tolas of the confection and one of the chebulic myrobalans are to be taken every morning.

Gud  shtaka.1 Take of danti, triwit and plumbago roots, black pepper, long pepper, ginger and long pepper root, equal parts in fine powder; treacle, equal in weight to all the other ingredients and mix. Dose, about a tola every morning in flatulence and retained secretions, anasarca, jaundice, etc.

You may click to see to learn more:-
(1) :
(2) :
(3) :

Threat Status Vulnerable / Regional
: Used In Ayurveda, Folk, Tibetian, Unani and Sidha

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://envis.frlht.org.in/junclist.php?txtbtname=&gesp=277%7CBaliospermum+montanum+(WILLD.)+MUELL.-ARG.
http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp
http://chestofbooks.com/health/materia-medica-drugs/Hindus-Materia-Medica/Baliospermum-Montanum-Mull-Sans.html
http://dhaarrii.blogspot.com/2009_09_10_archive.html

Otaheite Gooseberry

Botanical Name:Phyllanthus acidus
Family: Phyllanthaceae

Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Malpighiales
Tribe: Phyllantheae
Subtribe: Flueggeinae
Genus: Phyllanthus
Species: P. acidus
Parts Used :  Whole plant
Other Names:Malay gooseberry, Tahitian gooseberry, country gooseberry, star gooseberry, West India gooseberry or simply gooseberry tree,Kuppanti, Buddabudama / Tankari / Physalis minima, Linn.
In Telugu it is called Nela Usiri
Habitat:This tropical or subtropical species is thought to originate in Madagascar, then carried to the East Indies. Now it is generally found in South India, and Southeast Asia countries, such as Southern Vietnam, Laos, Indonesia and Northern Malaya. It also occurs in the Indian Ocean islands of Mauritius, Réunion and Rodrigues and also in Guam, Hawaii and several other Pacific islands. In 1793, the plant was introduces to Jamaica from Timor. From there, it progressively spread to the whole Caribbean region, as far as the Bahamas or Bermuda. It is now naturalized in Central and South America.

In the United States, the tree is occasionally found as a curiosity in Florida. For instance, it is resistant enough to fruit in Tampa.

Description:The plant is a curious intermediary between shrubs and tree, reaching 2 to 9 m in height. The tree’s dense and bushy crown is composed of thickish, tough main branches, at the end of which are clusters of deciduous, greenish, 15-to-30-cm long branchlets. The branchlets bear alternate leaves that are ovate or lanceolate in form, with short petioles and pointed ends. The leaves are 2-7.5 cm long and thin, they are green and smooth on the upperside and blue-green on the underside. In general, the Otaheite gooseberry very much looks like the bilimbi tree.
You may click to see the pictures…...(01)...(1)..(2)…...(3)…...(4)..

LeavesThe flowers can be male, female or hermaphrodite. They are small and pinkish and appear in clusters in 5-to-12.5-cm long panicles. Flowers are formed at leafless parts of the main branches, at the upper part of the tree. The fruits are numerous, oblate, with 6 to 8 ribs, develop so densely that they actually form spectacular masses. They are pale yellow or white, waxy, crisp and juicy, and very sour. It has only one seed in each fruit.

Cultivation:
The Otaheite gooseberry prefers moist soil. Although it usually grows from seeds, the tree can also be multiplied from budding, greenwood cuttings or air-layers. It bears two crops per year in South India: one in April-May and the other in August-September. Elsewhere, it is mainly harvested in January. It is mostly cultivated for ornamentation.

Food Uses:
The flesh must be sliced from the stone, or the fruits must be cooked and then pressed through a sieve to separate the stones. The sliced raw flesh can be covered with sugar and let stand in the refrigerator for a day. The sugar draws out the juice and modifies the acidity so that the flesh and juice can be used as a sauce. If left longer, the flesh shrivels and the juice can be strained off as a clear, pale-yellow sirup. In Indonesia, the tart flesh is added to many dishes as a flavoring. The juice is used in cold drinks in the Philippines. Bahamian cooks soak the whole fruits in salty water overnight to reduce the acidity, then rinse, boil once or twice, discarding the water, then boil with equal amount of sugar until thick, and put up in sterilized jars without removing seeds. The repeated processing results in considerable loss of flavor. Fully ripe fruits do not really require this treatment. If cooked long enough with plenty of sugar, the fruit and juice turn ruby-red and yield a sprightly jelly. In Malaya, the ripe or unripe Otaheite gooseberry is cooked and served as a relish, or made into a thick sirup or sweet preserve. It is also combined with other fruits in making chutney and jam because it helps these products to “set”. Often, the fruits are candied, or pickled in salt. In the Philippines, they are used to make vinegar.

The young leaves are cooked as greens in India and Indonesia.
The juice can be used in beverage, or the fruit pickled in sugar. When cooked with plenty of sugar, the fruit turns ruby red and produces a kind of jelly, which is called m?t chùm ru?t in Vietnamese. It can also be salted.

The fruit is called “Grosella” in Puerto Rico. Since the fruit is tart, it if often eaten in “Dulce de Grosellas”. The preparation of this dessert consist in simmering the berries with sugar until they are soft and turn red in color. The liquid from the cooking is also used as a beverage.

Other Uses
Wood: The wood is light-brown, fine-grained, attractive, fairly hard, strong, tough, durable if seasoned, but scarce, as the tree is seldom cut down.
Root bark: The root bark has limited use in tanning in India.
Medicinal Uses:Enlargement of Spleen, to restore flaccid breasts, to restore lost vigour,Bronchitis, Erysipelas, Ulcers, Ascites,Tonic, Diuretic, Purgative.

In India, the fruits are taken as liver tonic, to enrich the blood. The sirup is prescribed as a stomachic; and the seeds are cathartic. The leaves, with added pepper, are poulticed on sciatica, lumbago or rheumatism. A decoction of the leaves is given as a sudorific. Because of the mucilaginous nature of the leaves, they are taken as a demulcent in cases of gonorrhea.

The root is drastically purgative and regarded as toxic in Malaya but is boiled and the steam inhaled to relieve coughs and headache. The root infusion is taken in very small doses to alleviate asthma. Externally, the root is used to treat psoriasis of the soles of feet. The juice of the root bark, which contains saponin, gallic acid, tannin and a crystalline substance which may be lupeol, has been employed in criminal poisoning.

The acrid latex of various parts of the tree is emetic and purgative.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otaheite_gooseberry
http://apmab.ap.nic.in/products.php?&start=10#
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/otaheite_gooseberry.html

Enhanced by Zemanta