Tag Archives: Stomachic

Cardiospermum halicacabum

Botanical Name : Cardiospermum halicacabum
Family: Sapindaceae
Subfamily: Sapindoideae
Genus: Cardiospermum
Species: C. halicacabum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales

Common Names :   Balloon Vine, Love in a Puff, Heartseed, and Heartseed Vine.

Habitat :Cardiospermum halicacabum is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical Africa and Asia.India. N. America.Locally naturalized in S. Europe.Moist thickets and waste ground in Eastern N. America

Description:
Cardiospermum halicacabum is a decidious Climber growing to 3m.with twice 3-parted leaves that will reach 4 inches (10 cm) long. The plants climb with tendrils and need some form of support.with twice 3-parted leaves that will reach 4 inches (10 cm) long. The plants climb with tendrils and need some form of support.They are used as annuals in USDA zones 5-8 and are perennial in zones 9-11. and is frost tender.
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It is in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) The fruit from which the plant gets its common name is a brown, thin-shelled, inflated angled capsule up to 1 1/8 inch (3 cm) in diameter containing 3 black seeds each, with a white heart-shaped scar.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a moist soil and a sunny sheltered position, but succeeds in most soils. A frost-tender deciduous climber, it is grown as an annual in Britain.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 3 – 4 weeks at 20°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Leaves and young shoots – cooked. Used as a spinach

Medicinal Uses:
Diaphoretic; Diuretic; Emetic; Emmenagogue; Laxative; Refrigerant; Rubefacient; Stomachic.

The whole plant is diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue, laxative, refrigerant, rubefacient, stomachic and sudorific. It is used in the treatment of rheumatism, nervous diseases, stiffness of the limbs and snakebite. The leaves are rubefacient, they are applied as a poultice in the treatment of rheumatism. A tea made from them is used in the treatment of itchy skin. Salted leaves are used as a poultice on swellings.The leaf juice has been used as a treatment for earache. The root is diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, laxative and rubefacient. It is occasionally used in the treatment of rheumatism, lumbago and nervous diseases.

In Indian herbal medicine, balloon vine root is used to bring on delayed menstruation and to relieve backache and arthritis.  The leaves stimulate local circulation and are applied to painful joints to help speed the cleaning of toxins.  The seeds are also thought to help in the treatment of arthritis.  The plant as a whole has sedative properties.  It has been prescribed for years by European skin specialists and family doctors. In a study of 833 patients with eczema, better than 4 out of 5 subjects reported improvement or remission of symptoms (inflammation, swelling, scaling, blisters/vesicles, dry skin, itching, burning and pain).  This small and delicate wiry climber can be used to treat piles, rheumatism, nervous disorders and chronic bronchitis. A paste of the leaves is a dressing for sores and wounds. Crushed leaves can also be inhaled to relieve headaches and the seeds used to relieve fever and body aches.  A tea made from the leaves is used in the treatment of itchy skin. Salted leaves are used as a poultice on swellings.  The leaf juice has been used as a treatment for earache.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiospermum_halicacabum
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Cardiospermum+halicacabum
http://www.plantoftheweek.org/week256.shtml
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

 

 

Asparagus cochinchinensis

Botanical Name: Asparagus cochinchinensis
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Asparagoideae
Genus: Asparagus
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms : A. cochinchinensis. (Lour.)Merr. A. falcatus. Benth. A. insularis. Hance. Melanthium cochinchinen

Common Names:Chinese Asparagus, (chin. : tinméndng),(latin: Tuber asparagi Cochinensis)  Tian Men Dong actually translates to “Lush Winter Aerial Plant”.

Habitat :Asparagus cochinchinensis  grow mostly in E. Asia – China, Japan and Korea. The plants are found on the seashores all over Japan. Thinly forested slopes, roadsides and waste fields from near sea level to 1700 metres in China

Description:
Asparagus cochinchinensis is a  perennial plant growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in).
It is hardy to zone 7. It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen in September. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required) and are pollinated by Bees.The plant is not self-fertile

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Cultivation:
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Propagation:
Seed – pre-soak for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in spring or as soon as the seed is ripe in early autumn in a greenhouse. It usually germinates in 3 – 6 weeks at 25°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a sunny position in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Division in early spring as the plant comes into growth.

Edible Uses :
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Root.

Tubers – cooked. The tubers are up to 5cm long and 2m wide. They are washed to remove the bitterness, the fibrous core is removed and the root is then boiled. It tastes like asparagus. Another report says that the tubers are eaten after preserving in sugar. The fruit is said to be edible. The fruit is about 6 – 8mm in diameter. Another report says that the berries are harmful if eaten

Medicinal Uses:
Antibacterial;  Antiinflammatory;  Antipyretic;  Antiseptic;  Antitussive;  Cancer;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Infertility;  Nervine;  Sialagogue;
Stomachic;  Tonic.

This species has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years. The roots contain asparagine, mucilage, starch and sugars. The dried root is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antiseptic, antitussive, diuretic, expectorant, nervine, sialagogue, stomachic, nervous stimulant and tonic. It is taken internally in the treatment of fevers, debility, sore throats, coughs etc. It is often decocted with other herbs and used in the treatment of a wide range of ailments including diabetes mellitus. It is commonly used in restorative recipes together with Rehmannia glutinosa and Codonopsis javanica. Prolonged usage is recommended for the treatment of impotence. The root is harvested when the plant is dormant and is dried for later use.

Internally used for fevers, debility, sore throats, coughs, rhinitis, diphtheria, tuberculosis and bronchitis.  Asparagus root is used mostly for its diuretic qualities.  It may be helpful in treating cystitis and other urinary-tract infections.  It is taken internally in the treatment of fevers, debility, sore throats, coughs etc. It is often decocted with other herbs and used in the treatment of a wide range of ailments including diabetes mellitus. Prolonged usage is recommended for the treatment of impotence. The plant has a folk history for the treatment of cancer, modern research has detected antitumor activity and it is now being studied for the treatment of lung cancer. It is also known as a woman’s tonic, and is good for the female reproductive system.  Chinese herbalists consider it a valuable tonic that enhances love and compassion.  The best way to use asparagus root is by juicing the rot, or making a tea from the dried root.

Researches:
Tuber Asparagi Cochinensis is used in clinical research along with Bulbus Lilii (Bai He), Radix Glehniae Littoralis (Sha Shen) in lung cancer when a dry thorat and/ constipation appear. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered hot orally in three divided doses per day, morning, noon, and night. It appeared that the rates of radiation-induced esophagitis, bronchitis, and pneumonitis were markedly lower in the treatment group than the comparison group. Based on these findings, it was the author’s conclusion that treatment with Chinese medicinals based on pattern discrimination along with standard radiation therapy can achieve significantly better short-term survival rates and better local control of tumors with less side effects than radiation alone.

Laboratory studies presented that Astragalus can increase can increase the clearance rate of charcoal particles and the weight of immune organs (in mice), and thus helps to facilitate their antifatigue, anoxia tolerance, analgesia and memory improvement, as well as decrease the contents of lipid peroxide (LPO) in plasma, liver and brain.

Another research states that the herb’s active ingredients may inhibit TNF-alpha (turmor necrosis factor) secretion by inhibiting IL-1 secretion and they may have antiinflammatory activity in the central nervous system. The results showed that it was no pertinence between content of sarsaspogenin with the other Asparagus species.The content of sarsasapogenin in the tuberous roots of Asparagus Cochinchinensis was inverse ratio with the commercial grande in same species.
Used along with other herbs during ac chemotherapy for breast cancer.

The herb is also used in diabetes, malignant lymphoma, migraine headaches, systemic lupus erythmatosus and multiple sclerosis. Nonetheless, research on treating those conditions is very limited. Also used, as a base ingredient in phytoestrogen supplements.

Contraindications:
Since it is a nervous stimulant it should be avoided by people with neurosis and/ hysteria as it may cause insomnia.
Cold due to deficiency of spleen and stomach with loss of appetite and diarrhoea; cough due to wind-cold
Women who are pregnant or wish to be, should refrain from taking Asparagus long term, because this could inadvertently induce abortion. Sad to mention, but Hsia-p’u Hsien Hospital in Fukien Province use it as a cervical dilator to induce abortion.

Other Uses :
Insecticide.

Kills the larvae of flies and mosquitoes. No more details.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Asparagus+cochinchinensis

Asparagus Cochinchinensis seeds asparagi Cochinensis Tian Men Dong


http://www.newsfinder.org/site/readings/asparagus_cochinchinensis/
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

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Angelica sylvestris

Botanical Name : Angelica sylvestris
Family : Apiaceae – Carrot family
Genus : Angelica L. – angelica
Species : Angelica sylvestris L. – woodland angelica
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom : Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision : Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division : Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class:Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Rosidae
Order : Apiales

Synonyms:Angelica montana. Brot.

Common Names : Wild Angelica

Habitat :Angelica sylvestris grows in  Most of Europe, including Britain, to W. Asia and Siberia.It is  found in  Moist fields and hedgerows, open woods, marshes and fens, not usually found on acid soils.

Description;
Angelica sylvestris is a bennial plant. The umbels of tiny white flowers, often tinged with pink, are carried upright on tall (up to 2.5m) downy or hairless stems from June to September, giving a frothy appearance from a distance. The much divided, slightly glossy pinnate leaves add to the open, airy appearance. The flat, oval fruit have thin papery wings to aid their wind-borne dispersal.

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It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from June  to September, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, beetles.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Requires a deep moist fertile soil in dappled shade or full sun. Succeeds in deep shade. Plants are reliably perennial if they are prevented from setting seed.

Propagation
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe since the seed only has a short viability. Seed can also be sown in the spring, though germination rates will be lower. It requires light for germination. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in the spring. The seed can also be sow in situ as soon as it is ripe.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves;  Root;  Seed.
Edible Uses: Condiment.

Leaves, young shoots and stems – used as an aromatic addition to salads, or cooked and used as a vegetable. The taste is somewhat bitter. The chopped leaves are a good addition to cooked acid fruits, especially rhubarb. The stem and leafstalks are used in candies and sweetmeats. Seed – used as an aromatic flavouring in confections and pastries. Root – cooked.

Medicinal Uses :
Antispasmodic;  Carminative;  Diaphoretic;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Parasiticide;  Stimulant;  Stomachic;  Tonic.

The root and the seeds are antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, stimulant, stomachic, and tonic. This plant is less rich in active principles than A. archangelica and so is much less used medicinally than that species, but a decoction is sometimes used in the treatment of bronchial catarrh, coughs and dyspepsia. Large doses have the effect of depressing the central nervous system.

As angelica increases the output or urine and relieves flatulence, as well as inducing sweating, its applications are: a tea prepared from leaves, seeds and roots, is recommended for indigestion or stomach pains.  ½ glass of tea 3 times a day improves digestion.  Powdered root is used in cases of catarrh of the respiratory tract, as well as in cases of severe indigestion.  It may be used as a gargle and as an additive to bath-water.  Water-extract mixed with white vinegar, is used for rubbing down in cases of gout and rheumatics, as well as backache. A decoction is sometimes used in the treatment of bronchial catarrh, coughs and dyspepsia.  It is used as a substitute for Angelica archangelica, but is less rich in active principles and so is much less used medicinally than that species.

Other Uses :
Dye;  Parasiticide.

The pulverized fruits are used to kill head parasites. A good yellow dye is obtained from the plant (the report does not specify which part of the plant).

Known Hazards : All members of this genus contain furocoumarins, which increase skin sensitivity to sunlight and may cause dermatitis.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Angelica+sylvestris
http://wildseed.co.uk/species/view/16
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ANSY2

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm

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Calamintha nepeta

Botanical Name : Calamintha nepeta
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Calamintha
Species: C. nepeta
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Synonyms : Satureia nepeta.

Common Name: Lesser Calamint,Nepitella

Habitat ; Grows in Europe, including Britain, south from France and S. Russia to N. Africa and to Iran in W. Asia.Dry banks, usually on calcareous soils

Description:
Lesser Calamint grows as a beautiful perennial shrub for the herbal border forming a compact mound of shiny, green oregano-like leaves which become covered with lavender pink flowers to a height of 18 inches. The Lesser Calamint plant smells like a cross between mint, and oregano, and can attract butterflies. Lesser Calamint usually grows in the Summer, and well into the Fall. This plant needs not to be replanted year after year, as it can become dormant in the winter months, then reblossom in the spring. Furthermore, in the Fall, the plant’s flowers, which contain seeds, fall to the ground, and will “plant themselves,” therefore making a new plant blossom in the Spring. These flowers will start to appear in late August. Lesser Calamint grows wildly, but can be planted in pots, for convenience. The life expectancy for an average Lesser Calamint plant is about 3–4 years. The only problem with this plant is that a powdery mildew might occur on the plant.

 

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Cultivation :
Prefers a well-drained dry to moist neutral to alkaline soil and a warm sunny position. Plants are hardy to about -15°c. This species is very closely related to C. sylvatica, and is considered to be no more than a sub-species by some botanists. A very good bee plant.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. It usually germinates in 2 weeks at 21°c[138]. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and, if they grow sufficiently, plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer otherwise wait until the following spring. Division in spring. Very easy, larger clumps can be planted direct into their permanent positions. It is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are well rooted before planting them out in the summer. Basal cuttings in May or June. They should be rooted in a sandy compost[245]. Harvest the shoots when they are about 10 – 15cm long with plenty of underground stem. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Medicinal Uses:
Aromatic;  DiaphoreticExpectorantFebrifugeStomachic.

Lesser calamint was commonly used as a medicinal herb in medieval times, though is little used by modern herbalists. It is sometimes cultivated as a medicinal herb for household use. The whole plant is aromatic, diaphoretic, expectorant, febrifuge and stomachic. The leaves are harvested in July as the plant comes into flower and are dried for later use. An infusion is beneficial in cases of flatulent colic and weaknesses of the stomach, it is also used to treat depression, insomnia and painful menstruation[238]. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women since in excess it can cause a miscarriage.

Calamintha nepita breaks a fever by promoting sweating. It is also used as an expectorant and helps to cure jaundice. Effective when applied to snake bites and insect stings. In the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, a study reported in 1993 showed that Calamintha nepita when analyzed for its antimicrobial and fungicide activities it was found to have a biotoxic effect.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resours:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_LMN.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calamintha_nepeta
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Calamintha+nepeta

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Curlytop Knotweed

Botanical Name : Polygonum lapathifolium – L.
Family : Polygonaceae
Genus  : Polygonum
Synonyms   : Persicaria lapathifolia – (L.)S.F.Gray., Polygonum scabrum – Moench.

Habitat : Temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, including Britain. S. Africa.  Swampy thickets, shores, damp clearings and cultivated fields in N. America

Description:
Curlytop Knotweed is an erect, annual  herb, 2′-5′ tall forb; stems with nodes either smooth or cut, but not hairy; taprooted.Flowers are  white-green to pink, 4- or 5-parted, 1/8″ long, petals and petal-like sepals connected at the base; inflorescence many 1/3″-2″ long, nodding, spike-like clusters on a stalk jointed at the top; blooms July-Sept.They are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.) Fruits are  dry seed flat or concave on both sides. Leaves are  alternate, variable but usually lance-like, often woolly beneath.

 

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It is hardy to zone 5. .
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist or wet soil.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in an ordinary garden soil  but prefers a moisture retentive not too fertile soil in sun or part shade. Repays generous treatment . Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is usually free and easy. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer if they have reached sufficient size. If not, overwinter them in a cold frame and plant them out the following spring after the last expected frosts.

 

Edible Uses:Young leaves – raw or cooked. Seed – raw or cooked. It is rather small and fiddly to utilize.

Medicinal Uses:
Antiseptic; Astringent; Febrifuge; Stomachic.

The whole plant is antiseptic and astringent. An infusion has been used in the treatment of stomach complaints and fevers. The plant produces a soft white mass, a froth like that of soap. It is applied externally to burns.

Other Uses: The plant produces a soft white mass, a froth like that of soap. It is used for bathing and washing clothes.

Known Hazards : Although no specific mention has been made for this species, there have been reports that some members of this genus can cause photosensitivity in susceptible people. Many species also contain oxalic acid (the distinctive lemony flavour of sorrel) – whilst not toxic this substance can bind up other minerals making them unavailable to the body and leading to mineral deficiency. Having said that, a number of common foods such as sorrel and rhubarb contain oxalic acid and the leaves of most members of this genus are nutritious and beneficial to eat in moderate quantities. Cooking the leaves will reduce their content of oxalic acid. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones or hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet since it can aggravate their condition

Resources:
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Polygonum+lapathifolium
http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Polygonum+lapathifolium
http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/scripts/detail.asp?SpCode=POLLAP

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