Tag Archives: Sumatra

Acalypha lindheimeri

Botanical Name: Acalypha lindheimeri
Family : Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily:Acalyphoideae
Tribe : acalypheae
Subtribu: Acalyphinae
Genre : acalypha
Species : A. phleoides
United : Plantae
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta
Division : magnoliophyta
Class : magnoliopsida
Subclass: Rosidae
Order : Malpighiales

Common Names: Yerba del Cancer

Habitat : Acalypha lindheimeri is native to Mexico , where he is in semi – arid climates at an altitude of between 200 and 1850 meters , associated with disturbed vegetation of scrub xerófilo .

Description:
Acalypha lindheimeri is a perennial herb with a bottlebrush like inflorescence. It is found in disturbed areas where there is sufficient moisture. It is prostrate to somewhat ascending. The flowers occur in terminal spikes with pistillate and staminate flowers on the same spike. The fruit is a capsule with a single pitted seed per chamber.

A trailing plant of oak/juniper/pinyon woodland. Distinguished from other Acalypha in the area, in part, by the placement of staminate flowers at the tip of the inflorescences. This species is sometimes lumped into Acalypha phleoides, from which it is distinguished by being merely puberulent, rather than conspicuously hirsute.
It is a grass evergreen , erect it reaches a size of 20 to 50 cm. The leaves are guaranteed. The inflorescence is composed of a single flower. The fruit is a capsule containing 3 seeds.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES :
Medicinal Uses:
The leaves and flowers are brewed as a mild tea for regular use to treat stomach and duodenal ulcers. It also seems effective for colitis.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fes.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAcalypha_phleoides&edit-text=
http://wnmu.edu/academic/nspages/gilaflora/acalypha_lindheimeri.html
http://www.polyploid.net/swplants/pages/Acalypha_lind.html

Gnaphalium Arenarium

Botanical Name: Gnaphalium Arenarium
Family: Compositae/Asteraceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Genus: Helichrysum
Species: Helicrysum arenarium
Class : Dicotyledones

Synonym : Stoechados citricum (inflorescences Hel. Arenarium – are used in a scientific compounding).

Common Name: Everlasting Flower

Habitat: Gnaphalium Arenarium occurs in Mongolia, Russia; Europe & Japan.
It grows mainly on sandy soils, on dry wood glades, coppices, hills, on mezhah and deposits, sandy and stony slopes. It is extended everywhere.

Description:
Gnaphalium Arenarium is a perennial herb.It is a Long-term grassy plant in height 10 – 30 see the Stalk of this plant sherstisto-felt, as well as all plant, single (and if it is some of them the secondary do not fructify), grows from a rhizome – idle time, direct or ascending. The Rhizome woody, more often thick, 5-7(-15) mm in diam., or much thinner, only 1-4 mm in diam.

Leaves radical – prodolgovato-obratnojajtsevidnye, tupovatye, top – linearly-lantsetnye, sharp. Flowers citreous, sometimes orange, happen brick colour, are collected in spherical small baskets. Blossoms from June till October. A smell, plants, original.

Capitula (5-)10-30(-100) arranged in compact or slightly branching loose corymb, subspherical or widely obovate, (3-)4-6(-9) mm in diam., on peduncles of indefinite length; in young state corymbs capitate, usually surrounded by a few terminal leaves. Phyllaries ca. 50, slightly loosely arranged in (3 or)4-6(or 7) rows, often with declined tip at end of anthesis, bright lemon-yellow, more pallid yellow, pinkish, or orange; outer ones obovate or elliptic, abaxially densely villous, apex rounded; inner ones widely oblong-spatulate to sublinear.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Inflorescences-baskets, usually in first two weeks of flowering Gather. It is necessary to dry longer as touch of dryness is deceptive, and nedosushennye inflorescences if are still stored compressed, zaprevajut and spoil.

It is applied in the people as zhelchegonnoe, glistogonnoe, disinfecting bilious channels and mochetochniki, krovoostanavlivajushchee.

Cultivation:
Requires a well-drained, sunny sheltered position. Often cultivated for its flowers which are extensively used as a decoration and in wreaths etc. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow February/March in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks at 20°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts

Medicinal Uses:
Cholagogue; Diuretic; Homeopathy; Skin; Stomachic.

The fresh or dried flowers, or the entire flowering herb, are cholagogue, diuretic, skin and stomachic. An infusion is used in the treatment of gall bladder disorders and as a diuretic in treating rheumatism, cystitis etc. A homeopathic remedy is made from the flowering plant. It is used in the treatment of gall bladder disorders and lumbago.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.gbif.org/species/111436439
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200024007
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Helichrysum+arenarium
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gnapha21.html

Dragon’s Blood

Botanical Name :Daemomorops draco
Family: Arecaceae
Subfamily: Calamoideae
Tribe:     Calameae
Genus:     Daemonorops
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Arecales

Synonyms:  Calamus Draco. Draconis Resina. Sanguis draconis. Dragon’s Blood Palm. Blume.

Common Name: Dragon’s Blood,Blume, Calamus Draco, Draconis Resina, Dragon‘s Blood Palm, Sanguis draconis

Habitat:  Dragon’s Blood is native to Sumatra.

Description:Dragon’s Blood  is a Rattan Palm.The long, slender stems of the genus are flexible, and the older trees develop climbing propensities. The leaves have prickly stalks which often grow into long tails and the bark is provided with many hundreds of flattened spines. The berries are about the size of a cherry, and pointed. When ripe they are covered with a reddish, resinous substance which is separated in several ways, the most satisfactory being by steaming, or by shaking or rubbing in coarse, canvas bags. An inferior kind is obtained by boiling the fruits to obtain a decoction after they have undergone the second process. The product may come to market in beads, joined as if forming a necklace, and covered with leaves (Tear Dragon’s Blood), or in small, round sticks about 18 inches long, packed in leaves and strips of cane. Other varieties are found in irregular lumps, or in a reddish powder. They are known as lump, stick, reed, tear, or saucer Dragon’s Blood……..CLICK & SEE  THE  PICTURES

click to see the pictures

The stems of the Daemonorops are harvest for their cores, which is used for everything from canes to furniture. The fruits of certain species, in particular Daemonorops draco, produces a red resin known as “Dragon’s blood”. The seeds of species such as Daemonorops margaritae  are harvested for the production of Buddhist prayer beads.
Polished Daemonorops seeds on a mala

Polysaccharides found in some Daemonorops species are known for their medicinal anticoagulant properties.

Medicinal Uses:
-Part Used:--The resinous exudation of the fruits.
Chemical Constituents: Several analyses of Dragon’s Blood have been made with the following results:

(1) 50 to 70 per cent resinous compound of benzoic and benzoyl-acetic acid, with dracoresinotannol, and also dracon alban and dracoresene.

(2) 56.8 per cent of red resin compounded of the first three mentioned above, 2.5 per cent of the white, amorphous dracoalban, 13.58 of the yellow, resinous dracoresene, 18.4 vegetable debris, and 8.3 per cent. ash.

(3) 90.7 per cent of red resin, draconin, 2.0 of fixed oil, 3.0 of benzoic acid, 1.6 of calcium oxalate, and 3.7 of calcium phosphate.

(4) 2.5 per cent of draco-alban, 13.58 of draco resen, 56.86 of draco resin, benzoic dracoresinotannol ester and benzoylaceticdracoresinotannol ester, with 18.4 of insoluble substances.

Dragon’s Blood is not acted upon by water, but most of it is soluble in alcohol. It fuses by heat. The solution will stain marble a deep red, penetrating in proportion to the heat of the stone.

Dragon’s Blood   is a stringent, and regarded as effective for the treatment of dysentery.  It is applied externally as a wash or liniment to stop bleeding and promote healing.  Internally it is used for menstrual irregularities, chest pains, post-partum bleeding and traumatic injuries.  Doses of 10 to 30 grains were formerly given as an astringent in diarrhea, etc., but officially it is never at present used internally, being regarded as inert.  The following treatment is said to have cured cases of severe syphilis. Mix 2 drachms of Dragon’s Blood, 2 drachms of colocynth, 1/2  oz. of gamboge in a mortar, and add 3 gills of boiling water. Stir for an hour, while keeping hot. Allow to cool, and add while stirring a mixture of 2 oz. each of sweet spirits of nitre and copaiba balsam. Dragon’s Blood is not acted upon by water, but most of it is soluble in alcohol. It fuses by heat. The solution will stain marble a deep red, penetrating in proportion to the heat of the stone.

The following treatment is said to have cured cases of severe syphilis. Mix 2 drachms of Dragon’s Blood, 2 drachms of colocynth, 1/2 oz. of gamboge in a mortar, and add 3 gills of boiling water. Stir for an hour, while keeping hot. Allow to cool, and add while stirring a mixture of 2 OZ. each of sweet spirits of nitre and copaiba balsam.

Other Uses:
It is used as a colouring matter for varnishes, tooth-pastes, tinctures, plasters, for dyeing horn to imitate tortoiseshell, etc. It is very brittle, and breaks with an irregular, resinous fracture, is bright red and glossy inside, and darker red sometimes powdered with crimson, externally. Small, thin pieces are transparent.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/d/dragon20.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daemonorops

Dragon’s Blood (Daemomorops draco)

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_DE.htm

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Combretum

Botanical Name : Combretum sundaicum (MIF.)
Family: N.O. Combretaceae Myrobalans
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Myrtales
Genus: Combretum

Synonym: Jungle Weed, Alchornea.

Common Name :Combretum, the bushwillows or combretums

Habitat:Combretum is native to  Malay Peninsula and Sumatra, and the tropical regions of both Hemispheres.

Description:
. The genus comprises about 370 species of trees and shrubs, roughly 300 of which are native to tropical and southern Africa, about 5 to Madagascar, some 25 to tropical Asia and approximately 40 to tropical America. The genus is absent from Australia. Though somewhat reminiscent of willows (Salix) in their habitus, they are not particularly close relatives of these.

Bushwillow trees often are important plants in their habitat. Savannahs in Africa, in particular those growing on granitic soils, are often dominated by Combretum and its close relative Terminalia. For example C. apiculatum is a notable tree in the Angolan mopane woodlands ecoregion in the Kunene River basin in southern Africa.

Other species of this genus are a major component of Southwestern Amazonian moist forests. This genus contains several species that are pollinated by mammals other than bats, which is quite rare indeed. But most species are more conventionally pollinated by insects or birds.

Typhlodromus combretum, a mite of the family Phytoseiidae, was discovered on a bushwillow plant and is named after this genus. Other herbivores that eat Combretum foliage include the caterpillars of the Brown Awl (Badamia exclamationis) which is found on C. albidum, C. latifolium and C. ovalifolium; those of the Orange-tailed Awl (Bibasis sena) are recorded from C. extensum and C. latifolium.

Leaves are  odourless, taste astringent.
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Medicinal Uses:
Several species are used in African or Indian herbal medicine. The class of chemical compounds known as combretastatins were first isolated from South African Bushwillow (Combretum caffrum), from which they get their name. One synthetic derivative, fosbretabulin disodium (combretastatin A4 phosphate), underwent preliminary study for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer, but it was not effective enough to progress to more advanced trials. C. molle is also recorded to contain antioxidants such as punicalagin, which is also found in pomegranates (Punica granatum), a somewhat related plant.

The leaves and stalks roasted have long been used in China in the form of a decoction, as a cure for the opium habit, the daily dose of opium is added to a decoction of the leaves and the patient is given 1 fluid ounce of the mixture every four hours.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/combre91.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combretum

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Styrax benzoin

Botanical Name :Styrax benzoin
Family: Styracaceae
Genus: Styrax
Species: S. benzoin
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms:  Gum Benzoin. Gun Benjamin. Siam Benzoin. Sumatra Benzoin.

Common Names:Gum benjamin tree, Loban(in Arabic), Kemenyan(in Indonesia and Malaysia), Onycha, , Siam, Sumatra and Java.

Habitat :Styrax benzoin is a species of tree native to Sumatra in Indonesia.

Description:
It is a common member of the forests of Sumatra, where it grows to about 12 meters in maximum height.

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Benzoin is a balsamic resin. Normally the trees do not produce it or any substance analogous to it, but the infliction of a wound sufficiently severe to injure the cambium results in the formation of numerous oleoresin ducts in which the secretion is produced, it is, therefore, a pathological product. The trunk of the tree is hacked with an axe, and after a time the liquid Benzoin either accumulates beneath the bark or exudes from the incisions.CLICK & SEE   When it has sufficiently hardened it is collected and exported, either in the form of loose pieces (tears) or in masses packed in oblong boxes or in tins; several varieties are known, but Siam and Sumatra Benzoins are the most important. The incisions are made when the tree is seven years old, and in Sumatra each tree yields about 3 lb. annually for ten or twelve years. The first three years’ collections give the finest Benzoin; after that the runnings are known as the ‘belly,’ and finally the tree is cut down and the resin scraped out, this being termed the ‘foot.’ Siam Benzoin externally is reddish yellow, internally milky white, has an agreeable odour, recalling vanilla, contains benzoic acid but not cinnamic acid. Sumatra Benzoin is always in blocks of a dull reddish or greyish-brown colour. Fine qualities have a strong storax-like odour, quite distinct from the vanilla odour of the Siamese variety. Sumatra Benzoin contains cinnamic acid.

Constituents:  The chief constituent of Siam Benzoin is benzoic acid (up to 38 per cent.), partly free and partly combined with benzoresinol and siaresinotannol; it also contains vanillin and an oily aromatic liquid. When quite pure it should be entirely soluble in alcohol and yield only traces of ash. Sumatra benzoin contains 18 per cent. or more of benzoic acid and about 20 per cent. of cinnamic acid the latter partly free and partly combined with benzoresinol and sumarisinotannol; it also contains 1 per cent. of vanillin, styrol, styracin, phenyl-prophyl cinnamate and benzaldehyde, all of which combine to produce its characteristic odour.

Medicinal Uses:
Properties: * AntiCancer * Antiperspirant/Deodorants * Antirheumatic * Aromatic * Cardiac tonic Cordial * Carminative * Circulation * Diuretic * Expectorant * Muscle Relaxant * Sedative * Vulnerary

* Aromatherapy * Asthma * Bronchitis * Eczema * Rheumatoid_arthritis
Properties: * AntiCancer * Antiperspirant/Deodorants * Antirheumatic * Aromatic * Cardiac tonic Cordial * Carminative * Circulation * Diuretic * Expectorant * Muscle Relaxant * Sedative * Vulnerary
It is used externally in the form of a tincture, diluted with water as a mild stimulant and antiseptic in irritable conditions of the skin. It acts as a carminative when taken internally is rapidly absorbed, and mildly expectorant diuretic and antiseptic to the urinary passages. In the form of Compound Tincture of Benzoin, it is used as an inhalant with steam in laryngitis and bronchitis. It is a preservative of fats, and is used for that purpose in Adips Benzoatus.

Skin Care: Use benzoin resin in external skin applications to heal cuts and sooth inflammation of rough cracked skin. Benzoin is indicated for use where there is redness, irritation, or itching, such as eczema. The dark, vanilla-like resin also acts as an anchoring base note for aromatherapy blends and as a fixative in perfumery.

Cold Conditions: Use Benzoin in massage blends and aromatherapy applications for all cold conditions of the respiratory system ( related to the lungs). Colds, influenza, coughs, and bronchitis all benefit from benzoin, as well as cold conditions of the joints such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Other Uses:
Styrax benzoin is cultivated as a main source of benzoin resin in Indonesia. It is also grown as an ornamental tree for shade in West Africa.

Safety Information:
Syntex benzoin resin may cause possible skin sensitivity and contact dermatitis.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

 

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styrax_benzoin
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail5.php
http://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/benzoin-absolute.asp

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/benzoi31.html

 

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