Categories
Herbs & Plants

Impatiens walleriana

Botanical Name : Impatiens walleriana
Family: Balsaminaceae
Genus: Impatiens
Species:I. wallerana
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms:
*Impatiens giorgii De Wild.
*Impatiens holstii Engl. & Warb.
*Impatiens lujai De Wild.
*Impatiens sultani Hook.f.

Common Names: Busy Lizzie (United Kingdom), Balsam, Sultana, or Simply impatiens

Habitat :Impatiens walleriana is native to eastern Africa from Kenya to Mozambique.

Description:
Impatiens walleriana is a herbaceous perennial flowering plant growing to 15–60 cm (6–24 in) tall, with broad lanceolate leaves 3–12 cm long and 2–5 cm broad. Leaves are mostly alternate, although they may be opposite near the top of the plant. The flowers are profusely borne, 2–5 cm diameter, with five petals and a 1 cm spur. The seedpod explodes when ripe in the same manner as other Impatiens species, an evolutionary adaptation for seed dispersal. The stems are semi-succulent, and all parts of the plant (leaves, stems, flowers, roots) are soft and easily damaged.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Edible Uses:
Root – cooked. It is a source of ’salep’, a fine white to yellowish-white powder that is obtained by drying the tuber and grinding it into a powder. Salep is a starch-like substance with a sweetish taste and a faint somewhat unpleasant smell. It is said to be very nutritious and is made into a drink or can be added to cereals and used in making bread etc. One ounce of salep is said to be enough to sustain a person for a day.

Medicinal Uses:
Salep is very nutritive and demulcent. It has been used as a diet of special value for children and convalescents, being boiled with water, flavored and prepared in the same way as arrowroot. Rich in mucilage, it forms a soothing and demulcent jelly that is used in the treatment of irritations of the gastro-intestinal canal. One part of salep to fifty parts of water is sufficient to make a jelly.

This essence of the remedy addresses mental stresses and tensions. It calms feelings of impatience and irritability. It slows the tendency to move too quickly without care or forethought. Calming. Allows one to deepen his/her life experience without experiencing burnout.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impatiens_walleriana
http://healthyhomegardening.com/Plant.php?pid=2173

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Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Foot order or Smelly foot

English: Grown male right foot (angle 1)
English: Grown male right foot (angle 1) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Description:
Our foot sometimes gives out an unpleasant smell which is very much embarrassing.         ( medical term bromohidrosis)

click & see

It is a type of body odor that affects the feet of humans.The quality of foot odor is often reported as a thick smell. Some describe the smell like that of malt vinegar. However, it can also be ammonia-like. Brevibacteria are considered a major cause of foot odor because they ingest dead skin on the feet and, in the process, convert amino acid methionine into methanethiol, which has a sulfuric aroma. The dead skin that fuels this process is especially common on the soles and between the toes. The brevibacteria is also what gives cheeses such as Limburger, Bel Paese, Port du Salut, Pálpusztai and Munster their characteristic pungency.

Propionic acid (propanoic acid) is also present in many foot sweat samples. This acid is a breakdown product of amino acids by Propionibacteria, which thrive in the ducts of adolescent and adult sebaceous glands. The similarity in chemical structures between propionic acid and acetic acid, which share many physical characteristics such as odor, may account for foot odors identified as being vinegar-like. Isovaleric acid (3-methyl butanoic acid) is the other source of foot odor and is a result of actions of the bacteria Staphylococcus epidermidis which is also present in several strong cheese types.

Other implicated micro-organisms include Micrococcaceae, Corynebacterium and Pityrosporum.

Bart Knols, of Wageningen Agricultural University, the Netherlands, received an “IG Nobel” prize in 2006 for showing that the female malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae “is attracted equally to the smell of limburger cheese and to the smell of human feet”. Fredros Okumu, of Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania, received grants in 2009 and 2011 to develop mosquito attractants and traps to combat malaria. He uses a blend of eight chemicals, which is four times more effective than an actual human.

Causes;
The feet and hands contain more sweat glands than any other part of the body, with roughly 3,000 glands per square inch. Smelly feet are not only embarrassing, but can be physically uncomfortable as well.

Feet smell for two reasons: 1) shoe wear, and 2) sweating of the feet. The interaction between the perspiration and the bacteria that thrive in shoes and socks generates the odor.

Smelly feet or excessive sweating can also be caused by an inherited condition, called hyperhidrosis, which primarily affects men. Stress, some medications, fluid intake, and hormonal changes also can increase the amount of perspiration our bodies produce.

The main cause is foot sweat. Sweat itself is odorless, but it creates a beneficial environment for certain bacteria to grow and produce bad-smelling substances. These bacteria are naturally present on our skin as part of the human flora. Therefore, more smell is created with factors causing more sweating, such as wearing shoes and/or socks with inadequate air ventilation for many hours. Hair on the feet, especially on the toes, may contribute to the odor’s intensity by adding increased surface area in which the bacteria can thrive.

Given that socks directly contact the feet, their composition can have an impact on foot odor. Polyester and nylon are common materials used to make socks, but provide less ventilation than cotton or wool do when used for the same purpose. Wearing polyester or nylon socks may increase perspiration and therefore may intensify foot odor.[1] Because socks absorb varying amounts of perspiration from feet, wearing shoes without socks may increase the amount of perspiration contacting feet and thereby increase bacterial activities that cause odor

Treatments:
The best home remedy for foot odor is to soak feet in strong black tea for 30 minutes a day for a week. The acid in the tea kills the bacteria and closes the pores, keeping your feet dry longer. Use two tea bags per pint of water. Boil for 15 minutes, then add two quarts of cool water. Soak your feet in the cool solution. Alternately, you can soak your feet in a solution of one part vinegar and two parts water.

Persistent foot odor can indicate a low-grade infection or a severe case of hereditary sweating. In these cases, a prescription ointment may be required to treat the problem.

Treating Excessive Sweating:
A form of electrolysis, called iontophoresis, has been shown to reduce excessive sweating of the feet. However, it is more difficult to administer. In the worst cases of hyperhidrosis, a surgeon can cut the nerve that controls sweating. Recent advances in technology have made this surgery much safer, but may increase sweating in other areas of the body.

Prevention:
Methods of extinguishment may be used even before onset of the odor as prevention. However, a very effective and cheap way to prevent foot odor is with sodium bicarbonate (a mildly basic white salt also known as baking soda, bread soda, cooking soda, bicarbonate of soda, sodium bicarb, bicarb soda, or simply bicarb). Sodium bicarbonate

will create a hostile environment unsuitable for the bacteria responsible for the bad smell. Four pinches of it on each foot everyday are usually enough (two inside the sock and two on the insole of the shoe). Sometimes it might take one or two days before the shoes completely lose their old smell. Washing your feet and applying the sodium bicarbonate daily are also potentially useful solutions.

While there are a number of other remedies, sodium bicarbonate, if bought in a supermarket, costs approximately 20 times less than common odor-eaters or odor-killer powders.

Swabbing feet twice daily with isopropyl alcohol, found at your local drug store, for two weeks is a cheap and highly effective cure. One can also periodically remove their footwear, to reduce foot moisture and thereby reduce bacterial spawn.

Some types of powders and activated charcoal insoles, such as odor eaters, have been developed to prevent foot odor by keeping the feet dry. Special cedarsoles can be recommended for this purpose because of their antibacterial characteristics. Hygiene is considered important in avoiding odor, as is avoidance of synthetic shoes/socks, and rotation of the pairs of shoes worn

In general, smelly feet can be controlled with a few preventive measures:

•Always wear socks with closed shoes.
•Avoid wearing nylon socks or plastic shoes. Instead, wear shoes made of leather, canvas, mesh, or other materials that let your feet breathe.
•Bathe feet daily in lukewarm water, using a mild soap. Dry thoroughly.
•Change socks and shoes at least once a day.
•Check for fungal infections between toes and on the bottoms of your feet. If any redness or dry, patchy skin is observed, get treatment right away.
•Don’t wear the same pair of shoes two days in a row. If you frequently wear athletic shoes, alternate pairs so that the shoes can dry out. Give your shoes at least 24 hours to air out between wearings; if the odor doesn’t go away, discard the shoes.
•Dust your feet frequently with a nonmedicated baby powder or foot powder. Applying antibacterial ointment also may help.
•Practice good foot hygiene to keep bacteria levels at a minimum.
•Wear thick, soft socks to help draw moisture away from the feet. Cotton and other absorbent materials are best.

Extinguishment:

Once foot odor has begun, it can be extinguished, or at least alleviated, by either aromatic deodorants that neutralise the odor by their own smell, or by absorbers of the odor itself.

Among the earliest foot deodorants were aromatic herbs such as allspice, which nineteenth-century Russian soldiers would put in their boots.

Odor absorbers include activated charcoal foot insert wafers, such as Innofresh footwear odor absorbers.

General Tips: To tackle this problem, wash your feet with an antibacterial soap such as Neko and use a fresh pair of cotton socks daily. You can also apply deodorant to the soles of your feet. The best thing would be to buy another pair of work shoes and alternate wearing the two pairs so that the shoes have time to dry out.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_odor
http://www.wolfpodiatry.com/library/1932/SmellyFeetandFootOdor.html

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Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Albinism


Alternative Names
:achromia, achromasia, or achromatosis

Definition:
Albinism  is a congenital disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes due to absence or defect of an enzyme involved in the production of melanin. Albinism results from inheritance of recessive gene alleles and is known to affect all vertebrates, including humans. The most common term used for an organism affected by albinism is “albino”. Additional clinical adjectives sometimes used to refer to animals are “albinoid” and “albinic”.

click & see the pictures

Albinism is associated with a number of vision defects, such as photophobia, nystagmus and astigmatism. Lack of skin pigmentation makes the organism more susceptible to sunburn and skin cancers.

Several different genes are involved in albinism, depending on the specific type of the condition.

Classification in humans:

There are two main categories of albinism in humans:

*In oculocutaneous albinism Types 1-4 with different levels with pigmentation (despite its Latin-derived name meaning “eye-and-skin” albinism), pigment is lacking in the eyes, skin and hair. (The equivalent mutation in non-humans also results in lack of melanin in the fur, scales or feathers.) People with oculocutaneous albinism can have anything from no pigment at all to almost normal levels.

*In ocular albinism, only the eyes lack pigment. People who have ocular albinism have generally normal skin and hair color, although it is typically lighter than either parent. Many even have a normal eye appearance. Also, ocular albinism is generally sex-linked, therefore males are more likely to be affected. Males are without another X chromosome to mask recessive alleles on the X they inherit.

Other conditions include albinism as part of their presentation. These include Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome, Griscelli syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, and Tietz syndrome. These conditions are sometimes classified with albinism. Several have sub-types. Some are easily distinguished by appearance, but in most cases genetic testing is the only way to be certain.

Albinism was formerly categorized as tyrosinase-positive or -negative. In cases of tyrosinase-positive albinism, the enzyme tyrosinase is present. The melanocytes (pigment cells) are unable to produce melanin for any one of a variety of reasons that do not directly involve the tyrosinase enzyme. In tyrosinase-negative cases, either the tyrosinase enzyme is not produced or a nonfunctional version is produced. This classification has been rendered obsolete by recent research.

About one in 17,000 children in the UK is born with some type of albinism.It affects people from all races and its frequency across the human population is estimated to be approximately 1 in 20,000.

Symptoms:
People with albinism are born with little or no pigmentation in their eyes, skin and hair (oculocutaneous albinism) or sometimes in the eyes alone (ocular albinism). But the degree of pigmentation varies (especially in oculocutaneous albinism) and some people gain a little pigmentation in their hair or eyes with age, or develop pigmented freckles on their skin.

Apart from their physical appearance, people with the condition can experience a number of associated problems, depending on which genetic type they have.

Skin

Although the most recognizable form of albinism results in milky white skin, skin pigmentation can range from white to nearly the same as parents or siblings without albinism.

click & see

For some people with albinism, skin pigmentation never changes. For others, melanin production may begin or increase during childhood and adolescence, resulting in slight changes in pigmentation. With exposure to the sun, some people may develop:

*Freckles……CLICK & SEE
*Moles, with or without pigment
*Large freckle-like spots (lentigines)
*The ability to tan

Hair
Hair color can range from very white to brown. People of African or Asian descent who have albinism may have hair color that is yellow, reddish or brown. Hair color may also change by early adulthood.

Eye color
Eye color can range from very light blue to brown and may change with age.

CLICK & SEE

The lack of pigment in the colored part of your eyes (irises) makes them somewhat translucent. This means that the irises can’t completely block light from entering the eye. Because of this translucence, very light-colored eyes may appear red in some lighting. This occurs because you’re seeing light reflected off the back of the eye and passing back out through the iris again — similar to red eye that occurs in a flash photograph.

Vision
Signs and symptoms of albinism related to eye function include:

*Rapid, involuntary back-and-forth movement of the eyes (nystagmus)
*Inability of both eyes to stay directed at the same point or to move in unison (strabismus)
*Extreme nearsightedness or farsightedness
*Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
*Astigmatism

Causes:
The cause of albinism is a mutation in one of several genes. Each of these genes provides the chemically coded instructions for making one of several proteins involved in the production of melanin. Melanin is produced by cells called melanocytes, which are found in your skin and eyes. A mutation may result in no melanin production at all or a significant decline in the amount of melanin.

In most types of albinism, a person must inherit two copies of a mutated gene — one from each parent — in order to have albinism. If a person has only one copy, then he or she won’t have the disorder.

Impact of mutations on eye development
Regardless of which gene mutation is present, vision impairment is a common characteristic with all types of albinism. These impairments are caused by irregular development of the nerve pathways from the eye to the brain and from abnormal development of the retina.

Types of albinism
The system for classifying types of albinism is based primarily on which mutated gene caused the disorder rather than how it’s manifested. Nonetheless, most types of albinism have some features that distinguish them from each other. Types of albinism include:

*Oculocutaneous albinism.
Oculocutaneous albinism is caused by a mutation in one of four genes. These mutations result in signs and symptoms related to vision (ocular) and those related to skin (cutaneous), hair and iris color.

Oculocutaneous albinism 1 is caused by a mutation in a gene on chromosome 11. Most people with this type of albinism have milky white skin, white hair and blue eyes at birth. Some people with this disorder never experience changes in pigmentation, but others begin to produce melanin during childhood and adolescence. Their hair may become a golden blond or brown. Their skin usually doesn’t change color, but it may tan somewhat. The irises may also change color and lose some of their translucence.

Oculocutaneous albinism 2
is caused by a mutation in a gene on chromosome 15. It’s more common in Sub-Saharan Africans and African-Americans than in other population groups. The hair may be yellow, auburn, ginger or red, the eyes can be blue-gray or tan, and the skin is white at birth. In people of African descent, the skin may be light brown, and in those of Asian or Northern European descent, the skin is usually white. In either case, the skin color is generally close to the family’s coloring, but little bit lighter. With sun exposure, the skin may over time develop freckles, moles or lentigines.
Oculocutaneous albinism 3 (rare cases) is caused by a gene mutation on chromosome 9 and has been primarily identified in black South Africans. People with this disorder usually have reddish-brown skin, ginger or reddish hair, and hazel or brown eyes.

Oculocutaneous albinism 4, caused by a gene mutation on chromosome 5, is a rarer form of the disorder generally presenting signs and symptoms similar to those of type 2. This type of albinism may be one of the most common forms among people of Japanese descent.

*X-linked ocular albinism.
The cause of X-linked ocular albinism, which occurs almost exclusively in males, is a gene mutation on the X chromosome. People who have ocular albinism have the developmental and functional vision problems of albinism. But skin, hair and eye color are generally in the normal range or slightly lighter than that of others in the family.

*Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare albinism disorder caused by one of at least seven mutated genes. People with this disorder have signs and symptoms like those of oculocutaneous albinism, but they also develop lung and bowel diseases and a bleeding disorder.

*Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare form of albinism caused by a mutation in a gene on chromosome 1. Signs and symptoms are also similar to those of oculocutaneous albinism. The hair is usually brown or blond with a silvery sheen, and the skin is usually creamy white to grayish. People with this syndrome have a defect with white blood cells that results in a susceptibility to infections.

Compliccations:
Complications of albinism include physical risks as well as social and emotional challenges.

*In physical terms, humans with albinism commonly have vision problems and need sun protection. But they also face social and cultural challenges (even threats) as the condition is often a source of ridicule, discrimination, or even fear and violence. Cultures around the world have developed many beliefs regarding people with albinism. This folklore ranges from harmless myth to dangerous superstitions that cost human lives. Cultural challenges can be expected to be vastly higher in areas where pale skin and light hair stand out more from the ethnic majority’s average phenotype.

*In African countries such as Tanzania  and Burundi, there has been an unprecedented rise in witchcraft-related killings of albino people in recent years. This is because albino body parts are used in potions sold by witchdoctors. Numerous authenticated incidents have occurred in Africa during the 21st Century. For example, in Tanzania, in September 2009, three men were convicted of killing a 14-year-old albino boy and severing his legs in order to sell them for witchcraft purposes.[19] Again in Tanzania and Burundi in 2010, the murder and dismemberment of a kidnapped albino child is reported from the courts, as part of a continuing problem.

*Other examples: In Zimbabwe, belief that sex with an albinistic woman will cure a man of HIV has led to rapes (and subsequent HIV infection).

*Certain ethnic groups and insular areas exhibit heightened susceptibility to albinism, presumably due to genetic factors (reinforced by cultural traditions). These include notably the Native American Kuna and Zuni nations (respectively of Panama and New Mexico); Japan, in which one particular form of albinism is unusually common; and Ukerewe Island, the population of which shows a very high incidence of albinism.

All of these factors may contribute to social isolation, poor self-esteem and stress.

Treatment :
There’s no cure for albinism, but treatments and aids can help the symptoms and reduce the risk of damage to the skin and eyes.

For the most part, treatment of the eye conditions consists of visual rehabilitation. Surgery is possible on the ocular muscles to decrease nystagmus, strabismus and common refractive errors like astigmatism. Strabismus surgery may improve the appearance of the eyes. Nystagmus-damping surgery can also be performed, to reduce the “shaking” of the eyes back and forth. The effectiveness of all these procedures varies greatly and depends on individual circumstances. More importantly, since surgery will not restore a normal RPE or foveae, surgery will not provide fine binocular vision. In the case of esotropia (the “crossed eyes” form of strabismus), surgery may help vision by expanding the visual field (the area that the eyes can see while looking at one point).

Glasses and other vision aids, large-print materials and CCTV, as well as bright but angled reading lights, can help individuals with albinism, even though their vision cannot be corrected completely. Some people with Albinism do well using bifocals (with a strong reading lens), prescription reading glasses, and/or hand-held devices such as magnifiers or monoculars (a very simple telescope). Contact lenses may be colored to block light transmission through the iris. But in case of nystagmus this is not possible, due to the irritation that is caused by the movement of the eyes. Some use bioptics, glasses which have small telescopes mounted on, in, or behind their regular lenses, so that they can look through either the regular lens or the telescope. Newer designs of bioptics use smaller light-weight lenses. Some US states allow the use of bioptic telescopes for driving motor vehicles.

Although still disputed among the experts, many ophthalmologists recommend the use of spectacles from early childhood onward to allow the eyes the best development possible.

People with Hermansky-Pudlak and Chediak-Higashi syndromes usually require regular specialized care to prevent complications.
Home Remedies & Lifestyle
You can help your child learn self-care practices that should continue into adulthood:

*Use low-vision aids, such as a hand-held magnifying glass, a monocular or a magnifier that attaches to glasses.

*Apply sunscreens with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 that protects against both UVA and UVB light.

*Avoid high-risk sun exposure, such as being outside in the middle of the day, at high altitudes and on sunny days with thin cloud cover.

*Wear protective clothing, including long-sleeved shirts, long pants and broad-rimmed hats.

*Protect your eyes by wearing dark, UV-blocking sunglasses.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/albinism1.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albinism
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/albinism/DS00941

http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/problems/medical/albinism.htm/printable

http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/problems/medical/albinism2.htm

http://www.makeupbykaty.com/freckles-i-want-more/

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Herbs & Plants

Aerva lanata

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Botanical Name :Aerva lanata Linn
Family: Amaranthaceae
Subfamily: Amaranthoideae
Genus: Aerva
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Species: A. lanata
Common Names:Cheroola, Chaya, Gorakha ganja, Kapurijadi, Cherupula, Kapur-madhura, Paunsia, Buikallan, Poolai, Pindiconda.

Vernacular Names:-
Bengali: Chaya.
Duk.: Kul -ke -jar, Khul.
Hindi:Gorakhbuti or Kapuri jadi.
Kannada: Bilesuli.
Malayalam: Cherula.
Marathi: Kapuri-madhura.
Punjabi: Bui-kaltan (flowers as sold in bazaars).
Rajasthani: Bhui.
Sanskrit: Astmabayda
Sindhi: Bhui, Jari.
Sinhalese-Pol pala.
Tamil: Sirru -pulay -vayr.
Telugu: Pinde-conda, Pindi-chetter.
Trans-Indus: Asmei, Spirke, Sasai.
Swahili: Kinongo
Akan-Asante bameha
Abure n-tanfa
Akye: munongbe
Baule akopinolé
Guere (Chiehn) ura ore, wore oré (K&B) wulo wulé (B&D)

Habitat :- Native to
Afrotropic:
Northeast Tropical Africa: Ethiopia, Somalia
East Tropical Africa: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda
West-Central Tropical Africa: Cameroon, Rwanda, Zaire
West Tropical Africa: Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Togo
South Tropical Africa: Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe
Southern Africa: South Africa – Natal, Transvaal
Western Indian Ocean: Madagascar
Arabian Peninsula: Saudi Arabia
Indomalaya:
Indian Subcontinent: India, Sri Lanka
Malesia: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines
Australasia: Queensland

Description:
A semi erect many branched under shrub grows up to 50 cm in height. Leaves are simple, alternate, short petioled, tomentose, and become smaller in the flowering twigs. Flowers are small sessile, greenish or whitish, often found in spikes. Fruits are greenish round compressed utricle, seeds kidney shaped and small.

Click to see the pictures.>...…(01)...……..(1).………(2).……

Aerva lanata  is a common weed which grows wild everywhere in plains of India. The root has a camphor like aroma. The dried flowers which look like soft spikes, are sold under the commercial name as Buikallan or Boor.

Edible Uses:
The whole plant, especially the leaves, is edible. The leaves are put into soup or eaten as a spinach or as a vegetable. The plant provides grazing for stock, game in and chickens.

Medicinal Uses:

The plant is said to be diuretic and demulcent. Its diuretic action is said to be very effective in the treatment of urethral discharges and gonorrhoea and is of value in cases of lithiasis and as an anthelmintic. A trace of alkaloid has been detected.

As per Ayurveda
Plant pacifies vitiated pitta, urinry infection, vesical calculi, cough, and boils.

Leaves
A leaf-decoction is prepared as a gargle for treating sore-throat and used in various complex treatments against guinea-worm. to wash Babies that have become unconscious during an attack of malaria or of some other disease are washed with a leaf decoction at the same time smoke from the burning plant is inhaled. The leaf-sap is also used for eye-complaints. An infusion is given to cure diarrhoea and in an unspecified manner at childbirth, and on sores.

Decoction of the flowers is said to cure stones in any part of the stomach and that of the root is diuretic and cure for kidney stones

Root
The root is used in snake-bite treatment.

Flowers
For pains in the lower part of the back leaves and flowers are reduced to ash which is rubbed into cuts on the back.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Other Uses:

Spiritual
It gives protection against evil spirits, is a good-luck talisman for hunters, and safeguards the well-being of widows.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerva_lanata
http://enchantingkerala.org/ayurveda/ayurvedic-medicinal-plants/cherula.php
http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp

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Herbs & Plants

Acalypha fruticosa

 

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Botanical Name :Acalypha fruticosa Forssk.
Famille :   Euphorbiaceae
Genus: Acalypha

Synonyms:Acalypha betulina Retz, Acalypha capitata Wall. , Acalypha chrysadenia Suess. & Friedrich, Acalypha fruticosa var. villosa Hutch, Acalypha paxiana Dinter ex Pax & K.Hoffm.

Common Names: Cinna, Birch-leaved acalypha, Chinni, Sinnimaram, Sinni, Chinniaka.

Habitat :Africa, East Tropical Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda , Northeast Tropical Africa, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan  , Southern Africa, Namibia, Asia-Temperate, Arabian Peninsula, North Yemen, Saudi Arabia Asia-Tropical, Indian Subcontinent, Sri Lanka

Description:
An aromatic shrub up to 4 m tall.Stems pubescent and greenish at first, later glabrescent and reddish-brown.Petioles 0.53 cm long.Leaf blades 27 14.5 cm, ovate to rhombic-ovate, shortly caudate-acuminate at the apex, crenate-serrate to dentate on the margin, rounded to wide-cuneate or subtruncate at the base, membranous to thinly chartaceous, sparingly or evenly yellowish-pellucid gland-dotted beneath, sparingly to evenly pubescent on both surfaces, and usually more densely so along the midrib and main nerves beneath, 5(7)-nerved from the base; lateral nerves in 24 pairs.Stipules 34 mm, narrowly lanceolate, puberulous, chestnut-brown.Plants usually monoecious.Inflorescences rarely exceeding 2 cm in length, spicate, axillary, usually androgynous with a densely congested terminal male portion and with 14 bracteate female flowers at or near the base; male bracts 1 mm long, ovate, densely white-pubescent; female bracts foliaceous, accrescent to c. 810 1015 mm, broadly ovate to reniform, crenate or repand-dentate, sparingly yellow gland-dotted and often fairly prominently ribbed on the lower surface, sparingly pubescent, 1-flowered.Male flowers subsessile; buds tetragonous-subglobose, densely pubescent or white-tomentose.Female flowers sessile; sepals 3, 1 mm long, ovate-lanceolate, ciliate; ovary 0.7 mm in diameter, 3-lobed to subglobose, smooth, yellow-glandular in the grooves, densely pubescent; styles 4 mm long, free, laciniate, pink or red.Fruits 2 3 mm, 3-lobed, yellow gland-dotted, evenly pubescent-pilose.Seeds 1.52 11.3 mm, ellipsoid-ovoid, smooth, brown, with an elliptic vulviform caruncle.

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Leaves: Ovate to rhombic-ovate, shortly caudate-acuminate at the apex, crenate-serrate to dentate on the margin . Stems: Pubescent and greenish at first, later glabrescent and reddish-brown . Flowers: Female flowers are arranged singly or up to threes in the inflorescence . Flowers: Female flowers are broadly ovate to reniform, crenate or repand-dentate, sparingly yellow, gland dotted and often fairly prominently ribbed on the lower surface . Flowers: Male flowers are ovate, densely white-pubescent . Fruits: Yellow gland-dotted, evenly pubescent-pilose, 3-lobed . Height: 0.1-2 m [5104]. Height: 1-2 m . Height: Up to 4 m tall.

Medicinal Uses:
Roots, humans, gonorrhoea: In East Africa the root is used for gonorrhoea (Bally 1937) . Leaves, humans, cholera: In Tanzania the leaves of variety villosa are used as a remedy for cholera (Brenan and Greenway 1949) . In East India and Arabia the leaves are used in cholera (Dragendorff 1898) . Roots, humans, venereal diseases (non-specified) : In central Africa venereal disease is treated with the root . Roots, humans, fever: A decoction of the root is used as a febrifuge ( Brenan and Greenway 1949) . Humans, fever: The Sukuma regard the plant as an active febrifuge . Roots, humans, venereal disease (non-specified) , oral ingestion: The Pare drink an infusion of the root for chancre (Bally 1937, 1938) . Humans, fever: The plant is said to be effective for fever.

Digestive System Disorders, leaves, humans, stomach; humans, stomach  Infections/Infestations, roots, humans, venereal diseases (non-specified); humans, fever ; leaves, humans, cholera; roots, humans, gonorrhoea; roots, humans, venereal diseases (non-specified) , oral ingestion; roots, humans, fever Inflammation, leaf juice, humans, eyes ; leaf juice, humans, eyes, inflammation, eye drops  Injuries, humans, wounds, dressings; humans, wounds Pain, humans, chest ; leaves, humans, stomach  Poisonings, humans, snake bites Respiratory System Disorders, humans, coughs Sensory System Disorders, leaves, humans, eyes, eye drops.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.prota4u.org/protav8.asp?fr=1&g=pe&p=Acalypha+fruticosa+Forssk.
http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?423292
http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp

http://plants.jstor.org/specimen/b%2010%200153973

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