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Suck This ‘Magic Hormone’ into Your Body and Transform Your Health – Takes Just 20 Minutes

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A recent study published in the journal Mechanisms of Aging and Development confirms the “anti-aging” effect of high-intensity training.

Telomere shortening occurs as you age, however the factors involved are not entirely understood as of yet. The study was conducted to determine whether age-associated telomere shortening is related to habitual endurance exercise and maximal aerobic capacity.

The results suggest there’s a direct association between reduced telomere shortening in your later years and high-intensity-type exercises.

The authors’ state:
“The results of the present study provide evidence that leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is related to regular vigorous aerobic exercise and maximal aerobic exercise capacity with aging in healthy humans.

LTL is not influenced by aerobic exercise status among young subjects, presumably because TL is intact (i.e., already normal) in sedentary healthy young adults.

However, as LTL shortens with aging it appears that maintenance of aerobic fitness, produced by chronic strenuous exercise and reflected by higher VO2max, acts to preserve LTL.

… Our results indicate that leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is preserved in healthy older adults who perform vigorous aerobic exercise and is positively related to maximal aerobic exercise capacity. This may represent a novel molecular mechanism underlying the “anti-aging” effects of maintaining high aerobic fitness.”

But that’s not all.
High-intensity interval-type training also boosts human growth hormone (HGH) production. A 2003 study published in the journal Sports Medicine found that “exercise intensity above lactate threshold and for a minimum of 10 minutes appears to elicit the greatest stimulus to the secretion of HGH.”

Resources:
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development February 2010;131(2):165-7

Sports Medicine 2003;33(8):599-613
Sports Medicine 2002;32(15):987-1004
Growth Hormone and IGF Research December 2008;18(6):455-71
Journal of Applied Physiology 2005; 98: 1985–1990
Journal of Applied Physiology 2005; 98:1983-1984

Posted by: Dr. Mercola. December 24 2010

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Exercise Health & Fitness

Exercise ‘Can Fight Ageing’

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Long-term physical activity has an anti-ageing effect at the cellular level, a German study suggests.
…..click & see

Exercise seems to stimulate a key enzyme
Researchers focused on telomeres, the protective caps on the chromosomes that keep a cell’s DNA stable but shorten with age.

They found telomeres shortened less quickly in key immune cells of athletes with a long history of endurance training.

The study, by Saarland University, appears in the journal Circulation.

In a separate study of young Swedish men, cardiovascular fitness has been linked to increased intelligence and higher educational achievement.

Telomeres are relatively short sections of specialised DNA that sit at the ends of all our chromosomes.

They have been compared to the plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces that prevent the laces from unravelling.

Each time a cell divides, its telomeres shorten and the cell becomes more susceptible to dying.

National athletes:-
The researchers measured the length of telomeres in blood samples from two groups of professional athletes and two groups of people who were healthy non-smokers, but who did not take regular exercise.

One group of professional athletes included members of the German national track and field athletics team, who had an average age of 20.

The second group was made up of middle-aged athletes who had regularly run long distances – an average of 80km a week – since their youth.

The researchers found evidence that the physical exercise of the professional athletes led to activation of an enzyme called telomerase, which helped to stabilise telomeres.

This reduced the telomere shortening in leukocytes, a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in fighting infection and disease.

The most pronounced effect was found in athletes who had been regularly endurance training for several decades.

Potency of training:

Lead researcher Dr Ulrich Laufs said: “This is direct evidence of an anti-ageing effect of physical exercise.

“Our data improves the molecular understanding of the protective effects of exercise and underlines the potency of physical training in reducing the impact of age-related disease.”

Professor Tim Spector, an expert on genetics and ageing at Kings College London, said other studies had suggested more moderate exercise had a beneficial effect on ageing.

He said: “It is still difficult to separate cause and effect from these studies – as longer telomeres may still be a marker of fitness.

“Nevertheless – this is further evidence that regular exercise may retard aging.”

Professor Kay-Tee Khaw, of the University of Cambridge, an expert on ageing, said: “The benefits of physical activity for health are well established from many large long-term population studies.

“Even moderate levels of physical activity are related to lower levels of many heart disease risk factors such as blood pressure and cholesterol and lower risk of many chronic diseases associated with ageing such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some cancers.”

 

Intelligence link…….>In the second study, published in Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, a team from the University of Gothenburg analysed data on more than 1.2 million Swedish men born from 1950-1976 who enlisted for military service at age 18.

They found that good heart health was linked to higher intelligence, better educational achievement and raised status in society.

By studying twins in the study, the researchers concluded that environmental and lifestyle factors were key, rather than genetics.

They said the findings suggested that campaigns to promote physical exercise might help to raise standards of educational achievement across the population.

Lead researcher Professor Georg Kuhn said cardiovascular exercise increased blood flow to the brain, which in turn might help forge more and stronger connections between nerve cells.

However, he said it was also possible that intelligent people tended to make more exercise.

You may Click to see:->
Mutant genes ‘key to long life’
Nobel prize for chromosome find.
Hope for test to measure ageing.
Clean living ‘slows cell ageing’.
Healthy living ‘can add 14 years’.
Vitamin D ‘may help slow ageing’.

Source: BBC News :4th .Jan.2010

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Clean Living ‘Slows Cell Ageing’

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Taking more exercise and eating the right foods may help increase levels of an enzyme vital for guarding against age-related cell damage, work suggests.
………………….CLICK & SEE
Among 24 men asked to adopt healthy lifestyle changes for a US study in The Lancet Oncology, levels of telomerase increased by 29% on average.

Telomerase repairs and lengthens telomeres, which cap and protect the ends of chromosomes housing DNA.

As people age, telomeres shorten and cells become more susceptible to dying.

It is the damage and death of cells that causes ageing and disease in people.

Several factors such as smoking, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are associated with shorter-than-average telomeres.

Professor Dean Ornish, from the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in California, and his team wanted to find out if improvements in diet and lifestyle might have the opposite effect.

They asked 30 men, all with low-risk prostate cancers, to take part in a three-month trial of comprehensive lifestyle changes.

These consisted of a diet high in fruit and vegetables, supplements of vitamins and fish oils, an exercise regimen and classes in stress management, relaxation techniques and breathing exercises.

Telomerase activity was measured at the beginning of the trial and again at the end.

Among the 24 men who had sufficient data for analysis, blood levels of telomerase increased by 29% on average.

Increases in telomerase activity were linked with decreases in “bad” LDL cholesterol and decreases in one measure of stress – intrusive thoughts.

The researchers say it is too early to tell if the boost in telomerase levels will translate to a change in telomere length.

But there is evidence to suggest that telomere shortness and low telomerase activity might be important risk factors for cancer and cardiovascular disease.

“This might be a powerful motivator for many people to beneficially change their diet and lifestyle,” they told The Lancet Oncology.

Professor Tim Spector, from King’s College London, who has been researching ageing and telomeres, said: “This work builds on what we already know.

“Lifestyle can affect your telomeres. It would be interesting to find out whether it is diet, stress or both that is important.”

“This might be a powerful motivator for many people to beneficially change their diet and lifestyle ”

The study authors

Source: BBC NEWS:15th. Sept. ’08

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Faulty Gene Causes Heart Attack Death

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A faulty gene variant that can cause heart attack mortalities also potentially opens the way for improved treatment following such attacks.
……………………………………....CLICK & SEE

“It’s been known for some time that a defective ACE2 gene is associated with high blood pressure, but our research has also clearly linked one variant of this gene to a greater likelihood of mortality after heart attack,” said lead researcher Barry Palmer of Otago University, Christchurch.

“This is particularly in middle aged males who have acute coronary syndromes, or reduced flow of blood to the heart,” he added.

Otago scientists carried out the study over three years on a large cohort of 1,075 people (males and females) recruited from hospitals. They found, after adjusting for variables such as age, that male patients are almost twice as likely to die if they had one particular (defective) variant of the ACE2 gene.

“This is the first time ever that this variant of the ACE2 gene has been identified in terms of survivability,” said Palmer. “It will be useful in terms of other research we’re doing on tailoring heart disease treatment more accurately to the patient.”

“If we can identify those people at greater risk we may be able to do more earlier on in their treatment, and it’s easy enough to identify if someone has this variant of the gene.”

Males are more prone than females to the effects of the ACE2 gene variant which is linked to reduced survival because of their chromosomal make-up. That’s because males have only one copy in each cell of the ACE2 gene on the X chromosome and none on the Y chromosome, whereas females have two X chromosomes, according to an Otago release.

This means that if a male has a defective ACE2 gene variant there is no complementary chromosome which can compensate for that ineffective gene. Females have an alternative copy of the gene on their second X chromosome which can compensate for the defective ACE2 gene, and provide normal blood pressure to the heart.

In its normal form on the X chromosome the ACE2 gene produces an enzyme which controls blood pressure by influencing hormone levels. It is only when that gene is defective that blood pressure may increase.

The research was published in the October issue of the American Heart Journal.

You may click to see:->FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLAEMIA Cardiovascular disease

Sources:
The Times Of India

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Exercise Makes You Younger By 9 Yrs

Exercise may hold the key to youth, according to a study published on Monday, which showed people who keep fit are up to nine years biologically younger than those who do not.

The study of 2,401 twins found that a sedentary lifestyle raises the risk of a range of problems from heart disease to cancer and appears to play a key role in the ageing process.

It all boils down to the length of structures called telomeres   which protect the DNA on the chromosomes, the researchers from King’s College London wrote in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Many studies have shown telomeres get shorter over time, suggesting the cells are ageing or dying. The study, which extracted a DNA sample from their volunteers, found people who exercised more each week had longer telomeres.

Exercise lowers the risk of a range of problems such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer, the researchers said.
“It is not just walking around the block. It is really working up a sweat,” said Tim Spector, a genetic epidemiologist who led the study, in a telephone interview.

The study found people who exercised vigorously 3 hours each week had longer telomeres and were biologically 9 years younger than people who did under 15 minutes. Spector’s team, who also adjusted for body weight, smoking, economic status and physical activity at work, also said moderate exercise for 1-1/2 hours each week provided a four-year advantage.’

Sources: The Times Of India