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Herbs & Plants

Veronica chamaedrys

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Botanical Name : Veronica chamaedrys
Family:    Plantaginaceae
Genus:    Veronica
Species: V. chamaedrys
Kingdom:  Plantae
Order:    Lamiales

Synonyms: Fluellin the Male. Veronique petit Chêne. Paul’s Betony. Eye of Christ. Angels’ Eyes. Cat’s Eye. Bird’s Eye. Farewell,  Teucrium officinalis.

Common Names:  Germander speedwell, Bird’s-eye speedwell,Wall Germander, Germander

Habitat :   Veronica chamaedrys is native to Europe and northern Asia. It is found on other continents as an introduced species.It grows in sunny, rather dry places on waste ground and rocky outcrops, mainly on limestone soils  Naturalized on old walls in Britain

Description:
Veronica chamaedrys is a herbaceous perennial plant with hairy stems and leaves. It can grow to 25 cm tall, but is normally about 12 cm tall. The flowers are deep blue, 8 to 12 mm wide with a zygomorphic (bilaterally-symmetrical) four-lobed corolla.This little plant has a creeping, branched root-stock, passing insensibly into the stem, which is weak and decumbent to the point where the leaves commence, and then raises itself about a foot, to carry up the flowers. The leaves are in pairs, nearly stalkless, 1/2 to 1 1/2 inches long, egg-shaped to heart-shaped, deeply furrowed by the veins, the margins coarsely toothed. On the whole length of the stem are two lines of long hairs running down between each pair of leaves, shifting from side to side wherever they arrive at a fresh pair of leaves. These hairy lines act as barriers to check the advance of unwelcome crawling insects. The leaves themselves bear jointed hairs, and the flower-stalks, calyx and capsule also have long, gland-tipped hairs. The leaves are sometimes attacked by a gall mite, Cecidomyia Veronica, and white galls like white buttons are the result on the ends of the shoots.
 CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The numerous flowers are in loose racemes, 2 to 6 inches long in the axils of the leaves, the flowers are rather close together on first expanding, but become distant after the fall of the corolla, which is 1/2 inch across, bright blue with darker lines, and a white eye in the centre, where the four petals join into the short tube. The corolla is so lightly attached that the least jarring causes it to drop, so that the plant at the slightest handling loses its bright blossom – hence, perhaps, its name Speedwell and similar local names, ‘Fare well’ and ‘Good-bye.’ The under lip of the corolla covers the upper in bud. The flower closes at night and also in rainy weather, when the brightness of the blossoms quite disappears, only the pale and pearly underside of its petals being visible.
Edible Uses : The plant is widely used in making alcoholic drinks with a bitter base, which have digestive or appetite-promoting qualities.
Medicinal Uses:

Antiinflammatory; Antirheumatic; Aperient; Aromatic; Astringent; Bitter; Carminative; Diaphoretic; Digestive; Diuretic; Stimulant;
Tonic.

Wall germander is a specific for the treatment of gout, it is also used for its diuretic properties, and as a treatment for weak stomachs and lack of appetite[9]. It has also been taken as an aid to weight loss and is a common ingredient in tonic wines. Some caution is advised when using this plant internally, it can cause liver damage[238] The whole herb is anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, aperient, aromatic, astringent, bitter, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, stimulant and tonic. It is harvested in the summer and can be dried for later use. It is used externally as an astringent infusion on the gums and also in the treatment of wounds.

Other Uses
Essential; Hedge; Hedge.

Amenable to light trimming so can be grown as a low edging border in the garden. Any trimming is best done in the spring. The plant contains 0.6% of an essential oil. Plants can be grown as a ground cover when planted about 30cm apart each way

 

 

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_chamaedrys
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/s/speger76.html

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Herbs & Plants

Teucrium scorodonia

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Botanical Name :Teucrium scorodonia
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Teucrium
Species: T. scorodonia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Synonyms: Wood Sage. Large-leaved Germander. Hind Heal. Ambroise. Garlic Sage.

Common Name: wood sage or woodland germander

Habitat: Teucrium scorodonia is  native of Europe and Morocco, found in woody and hilly situations among bushes and under hedges, where the soil is dry and stony. It is frequent in such places in most parts of Great Britain.

Description;
Teucrium scorodonia is a perennial and creeping herb. It reaches on average 30–60 centimetres (12–24 in) of height. It is a hairy shrub with erect and branched stems. The leaves are petiolate, irregularly toothed, triangular-ovate to oblong shaped, lightly wrinkled. The inflorescence is composed by one-sided (all flowers “look” at the same side) pale green or yellowish flowers bearing four stamens with reddish or violet filaments. These flowers grow in the axils of the upper leaves and are hermaphrodite, tomentose and bilabiate but lack an upper lip, as all Teucrium ones. The flowering period extends from June through August. These plants are mainly pollinated by Hymenoptera species.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
The whole plant is softly hairy or pubescent. The small labiate flowers are in onesided spike-like clusters, the corollas greenish-yellow in colour, with four stamens, which have yellow anthers, and very noticeable purple and hairy filaments. The terminal flowering spike is about as long again as those that spring laterally below it from the axils of the uppermost pair of leaves.

Cultivation: Teucrium scorodonia is generally collected in the wild state, but will thrive in any moderately good soil, and in almost any situation.

It may be increased by seeds, by cuttings, inserted in sandy soil, under a glass, in spring and summer; or by division of roots in the autumn.

Edible Uses: Condiment……..The plant resembles hops in taste and flavour. An infusion of the leaves and flowers is used as a hop substitute for flavouring beer in some areas. It is said to clear the beer more quickly than hops, but imparts too much colour to the brew

Parts Uses:The whole herb, collected in July.

Constituents: A volatile oil, some tannin and a bitter principle.
Medicinal Uses:
Alterative; Appetizer; Astringent; Carminative; Diaphoretic; Diuretic; Emmenagogue; Skin; Tonic; Vulnerary.

The herb is alterative, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue, tonic and vulnerary. It is harvested in July and can be dried for later use. The herb is often used in domestic herbal practice in the treatment of skin afflictions, diseases of the blood, fevers, colds etc. It is an appetizer of the first order and is equal to gentian root as a tonic.
Teucrium scorodonia or wood sage may be used for all infections of the upper respiratory tract, especially for colds and influenza. It may be used as a diaphoretic in all fevers. It can prove beneficial in some cases of rheumatism. There is a marked stimulation of gastric juices, thereby aiding digestion and relieving flatulent indigestion. It’s equal to gentian root as a bitter tonic. Externally wood sage will speed the healing of wounds, boils and abscesses.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gersag10.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teucrium_scorodonia

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Teucrium+scorodonia

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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Herbs & Plants

Teucrium chamaedrys

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Botanical Name : Teucrium chamaedrys
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Teucrium
Species: T. chamaedrys
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Synonyms:  Teucrium officinale – Lam.

Common Name :Wall germander

Habitat : Teucrium chamaedrys is native to Europe and the Near East. It grows in Sunny, rather dry places on waste ground and rocky outcrops, mainly on limestone soils Naturalized on old walls in Britain

Description:
Teucrium chamaedrys is a creeping evergreen perennial 6 to 18 inches tall. Its scalloped, opposite leaves are half   inch  to one & half inches  long, dark green, and shiny. In late summer, tubular flowers grow in whorls from the leaf axils

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to September, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soil. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in any moderately good soil in sun or light shade. Prefers a dry calcareous soil and a sunny position. A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to at least -29°c. Wall germander was at one time widely cultivated as a medicinal plant, though it is seldom use at present. It is a very ornamental plant, making a good edging for the border and able to be lightly clipped. The fresh leaves are bitter and pungent to the taste, when rubbed they emit a strong odour somewhat resembling garlic. This species is often confused in gardens with T. divaricatum and T. x lucidrys. It is important to ensure that you have the correct plant if using it medicinally. Cut off dead flower spikes when the plant has finished flowering in order to encourage bushy new growth. A good bee plant. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer if they are large enough. Otherwise, grow them on in a cold frame for the winter and plant them out in the following spring. Division in early spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame

Edible Uses:
The plant is widely used in making alcoholic drinks with a bitter base, which have digestive or appetite-promoting qualities

Medicinal Uses:
Antiinflammatory; Antirheumatic; Aperient; Aromatic; Astringent; Bitter; Carminative; Diaphoretic; Digestive; Diuretic; Stimulant; Tonic.

Wall germander is a specific for the treatment of gout, it is also used for its diuretic properties, and as a treatment for weak stomachs and lack of appetite. It has also been taken as an aid to weight loss and is a common ingredient in tonic wines. Some caution is advised when using this plant internally, it can cause liver damage The whole herb is anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, aperient, aromatic, astringent, bitter, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, stimulant and tonic. It is harvested in the summer and can be dried for later use. It is used externally as an astringent infusion on the gums and also in the treatment of wounds.

Other Uses
Essential; Ground cover; Hedge.

Amenable to light trimming so can be grown as a low edging border in the garden. Any trimming is best done in the spring. The plant contains 0.6% of an essential oil. Plants can be grown as a ground cover when planted about 30cm apart each way

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teucrium_chamaedrys
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Teucrium+chamaedrys

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Teucrium+chamaedrys

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Herbs & Plants

Cat Thyme

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Botanical Name  :Teucrium marum
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Teucrium
Species: T. marum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Common Name :Cat Thyme

Habitat:Cat thyme, a native of Spain and the Western Mediterranean, will live through the winter in the open, on a dry soil and in a good situation, when the frosts are not severe, though it is frequently killed in hard winters if unprotected by mats or other covering.It grows in  dry hills and bushy places.

Description:
Teucrium marum is an evergreen Shrub growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in). It has oval leaves, broader at the base, downy beneath, with uncut margins. It  is not frost tender.  It is in leaf all year. It is in flower from Jul to September, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES…..
The flowers,  are in one-sided spikes, the corollas are crimson in color.

The leaves and younger branches when fresh, on being rubbed emit a volatile, pungent, aromatic smell, which excites sneezing, but in taste they are somewhat bitter, accompanied with a sensation of heat.

Some, but not all cats prefer it to catnip and will corkscrew themselves into the plant in ecstasy.

Older plants can shrub 3 or 4 feet high if grown in a mild climate…..click & see

Cultivation :
Succeeds in any moderately good soil, preferring a dry soil and a sunny position. Does well in dry places in the rock garden[1]. Plants are not fully hardy in Britain, they can be killed in severe winters especially if the weather is wet. The bruised leaves release a pungent aroma. Cats are strongly attracted to this plant and may tear it to pieces. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer if they are large enough. Otherwise, grow them on in a cold frame for the winter and plant them out in the following spring. Division in early spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.

Medicinal Uses:

The whole herb is aromatic, deobstruent, diuretic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic and tonic. The plant is supposed to possess very active powers and has been recommended in the treatment of many diseases, being considered useful in most nervous complaints. It is used in the treatment of gallbladder and stomach problems. The root bark is considerably astringent and has been used for checking haemorrhages. A homeopathic remedy is made from the whole herb. It is said to be effectual against small thread-worms in children.

The leaves in powdered form given in wine. The powdered leaves, either alone, or mixed with other ingredients of a like nature, when taken as snuff, have been recommended as excellent for ‘disorders of the head,’ under the name of compound powder of Assarabacca, but lavender flowers are now generally substituted for Cat Thyme. The root bark is considerably astringent and has been used for checking hemorrhages.

Other Uses:
This herb is nirvana to cats. Its potent fragrance makes cats loll about in ecstasy. Forget about weak yet better known cat mint (Nepeta spp.). But despite its value as a cat pleaser, and its charming beauty, it is very little known.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teucrium_marum
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Teucrium_marum
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.arthurleej.com/p-o-m-July04.html

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Teucrium+marum