Categories
Herbs & Plants

Prunus cerasoides

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Botanical Name : Prunus cerasoides
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Cerasus
Species: P. cerasoides
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms:
*Prunus majestica Koehne
*Prunus puddum Franch.

Common Names: Wild Himalayan cherry or Sour cherry

Habitat : Prunus cerasoides is native to E. Asia – Himalayas from Himachel Pradesh to S.W. China and Burma. It grows in the forests, 1200 – 2400 metres. Forests in ravines at elevations of 700 – 3700 metres in western China.
Description:
Prunus cerasoides is a deciduous Tree growing to 30 m (98ft 5in). It has glossy, ringed bark. When the tree is not in flower, it is characterised by glossy, ringed bark and long, dentate stipules.

The tree flowers in autumn and winter. Flowers are pinkish white in color. It has ovoid yellow fruit that turns red as it ripens.

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Requires an open sunny sheltered position. Not very hardy in Britain but it succeeds outdoors in the milder areas of the country. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.
Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.

Fruit – raw or cooked. Acid and astringent, they are only occasionally eaten raw but are more often cooked. The fruit is about 15mm in diameter and contains one large seed. Gum – chewed. Obtained from the trunk, it can be employed as a substitute for gum tragacanth, see Astragalus spp. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
The fruit is astringent. The juice of the bark is applied externally to treat backaches. Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses:
Beads; Dye; Gum; Wood.

A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit. The seeds are used as beads in necklaces and rosaries. Wood – moderately hard, strong, durable, aromatic. The branches are used as walking sticks
Known Hazards: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cerasoides
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+cerasoides

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Categories
Herbs & Plants

Prunus caroliniana

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Botanical Name : Prunus caroliniana
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Species: P. caroliniana
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms: Laurocerasus caroliniana. (Mill.)Roem.

Common Names: American Cherry Laurel, Carolina laurelcherry, Laurel Cherry, Cherry laurel, or Carolina cherry

Habitat : Prunus caroliniana is native to the lowlands of Southeastern United States, from North Carolina south to Florida and westward to central Texas. The species has also escaped into the wild in a few places in California. It grows on deep, well-drained rich moist bottomlands, bluffs or streambanks.
Description:
Prunus caroliniana is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree which grows to about 5–13 meters (16–43 ft) tall, with a spread of about 6–9 meters (20–30 ft). The leaves are dark green, alternate, shiny, leathery, elliptic to oblanceolate, 5–12 cm (2–4.5 in) long, usually with an entire (smooth) margin, but occasionally serrulate (having subtle serrations), and with cuneate bases. Reproductively mature trees have entire margins, whereas immature ones often have subtle serrations. The twigs are red to grayish brown, slender, and glabrous.

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Fragrant white to cream-colored flowers are produced in racemes (stalked bunches) 5–8 cm (2–3 in) long in the late winter to early spring. The fruits are tiny black cherries about 1 cm (0.5 in) in diameter, which persist through winter and are primarily consumed by birds (February – April).
It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen in October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
Characteristics:
The leaves and branches contain high amounts of cyanogenic glycosides that break down into hydrogen cyanide when damaged, making it a potential toxic hazard to grazing livestock and children. Due to this, it is considered highly deer-resistant. When crushed, its leaves and green twigs emit a fragrance described as resembling maraschino cherries or almond extract..

Cultivation:
Landscape Uses:Pest tolerant, Screen, Standard, Street tree, Woodland garden. Requires a well-drained moisture retentive soil.   Succeeds in a hot dry position. Succeeds in light shade but fruits better in a sunny position. Thrives in a loamy soil, doing well on limestone.  Prefers some chalk in the soil but apt to become chlorotic if too much is present. Fairly wind-resistant[200]. One report says that this species is tender in most of Britain, whilst another says that it succeeds in climatic zone 7 (tolerating frosts down to about -15°c). A fast-growing but short-lived tree. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus. Special Features:North American native, Naturalizing, All or parts of this plant are poisonous, Fragrant flowers, Attractive flowers or blooms.
Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.
Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.
The fruit might be edible. It has a thick skin and a thin dry flesh[82] and is not edible. It is slightly toxic to humans. The fruit is about 13mm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses:
Dye; Hedge; Hedge; Shelterbelt; Wood.

Amenable to trimming, this plant can be grown as a screen and hedge. It can also be used in shelterbelt plantings. A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit. Wood – hard, heavy, strong, close grained. The trees are seldom large enough for the wood to be exploited commercially.

Known Hazards: The leaves and young branches of this species contain considerable quantities of hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+caroliniana
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_caroliniana

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Prunus capsica

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Botanical Name: Prunus capsica
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Prunoideae
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Cerasus
Section: Cerasus
Species :P. capsica
Kingdom : Plantae
Phylum/Division : Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales

Common Name: Siberian Apricot

Habitat : Prunus capsica is native to W. Asia – N. Iran. It grows on the woodland Garden Sunny Edge. Dry sunny slopes amongst shrubs. Forests, thickets, hill grasslands, river valleys and dry sunny slopes at elevations of 400 – 2500 metres.

Description:
Prunus capsica is a deciduous Tree. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

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Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know how hardy it will be in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of this country. This species is possibly no more than a cultivated form of P. cerasifera divaricata. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Succeeds in sun or partial shade though it fruits better in a sunny position. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.
Edible Uses:

Fruit – raw or cooked. The fruit contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.

Other Uses:.…Dye…..A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit

Known Hazards: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

Prunus canescens


http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+capsica

Categories
Healthy Tips

Herbal tea with honey and cinnamon may act as an elixir of life

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Many people love honey, and many people love cinnamon. And when used separately, each has its own healing capabilities. But when the two are mixed together and consumed, magic can happen. Okay, not really magic, but some have called this an “elixir of health and immortality”. But why is this mixture given such a high prestige? Here we will talk about just a few of the great benefits that this mixture can produce for people. The first we will discuss is digestion: honey combined with cinnamon has been shown to speed up digestion, and can help you digest some of those foods that you sometimes struggle with. Next, bad cholesterol: 3 teaspoons of cinnamon mixed with 2 tablespoons of honey and placed in green tea three times a day, and you will see your cholesterol lower in just days.(You may click to see the picture)

 

If you need to lose weight, you can benefit as well. A teaspoon each of honey and cinnamon, cooked with water, drunk twice a day, will help you to prevent fat from building up in the body. Honey and cinnamon can also help you to strengthen your immune system, preventing illnesses from both viruses and bacteria. A few other benefits include help with fatigue, reduction of joint inflammation/arthritis, and prevention of bladder infections. If you suffer from any of these ailments, or simply want to improve your health, do a little research and see if this is the right elixir for you and your needs.

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Categories
Herbs & Plants

Millettia reticulata

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Botanical Name :Millettia reticulata
Family :Fabaceae
Genus: Millettia
Species: reticulata
Common Name: Evergreen Wisteria,  Ji Xue Teng

Habitat : Millettia reticulata  is native to   E. Asia – S. China.  It grows on damp shady places. Thickets on slopes and in valleys at elevations of 100 – 950 metres.

Description:

Millettia reticulata is a deciduous Climber growing to 5 m (16ft 5in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 8. It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to November. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.It can fix Nitrogen.
Its leathery, dark green leaves are made irrelevant when the red-violet, pea-shaped flowers of the evergreen wisteria appear in spring and summer. A woody vine that has twining, rambling, and shrub-like qualities, it is evergreen only in the warmest of regions, being a native of southern China and Taiwan. Its compound leaves are made up of seven to thirteen dark green, leathery, long, oval and pointed leaflets. Anytime from spring to fall, finger-like, spiked clusters of flowers jet outward from the leafy stems. Each blossom is pea-flower shaped, ranging from a red-violet to purple, with a yellow throat. The flowers are mildly fragrant, reminiscent of cedar or camphor, possibly a bit malodorous to some. Bees pollinate them, eventually yielding long, hard, awkwardly formed seedpods by late fall. Repeated flowering can occur if spent flowers and young pods are pruned off.

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Grow evergreen wisteria in full to partial sun in a rich, well-drained acidic or neutral soil. It needs a sturdy support to climb, for example, a broad trellis, arbor, or mortared stone wall. Without support, the vine becomes a sprawling, haphazard groundcover. In areas with cool, frosty winters the leaves drop off and stems may die back. Mulching the root crown over the winter helps ensure the vine’s return in spring. The plant can look quite ratty when deciduous, and is particularly annoying in spring as you wait for the new leaves.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in full sun in a fertile moisture-retentive but well-drained soil. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c and down to about -15°c when given the protection of a warm sunny wall. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby.
Propagation:
Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and sow in a greenhouse in spring. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Layering in spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with the leaves removed, July/August in moist sand in a frame

Medicinal Uses:
Medicinal propertiesantianemic hypotensive   anti-inflammatory   gynecologic

In Chinese herbal medicine, pain is often thought to be due to poor or obstructed blood flow.  In this tradition, ji xue teng is classified as an herb that invigorates the blood, and is mainly used to treat menstrual problems.  Ji xue teng is used to relieve menstrual pain or an irregular or absent cycle, especially where this may be due to blood deficiency such as anemia.  It is also prescribed for certain types of arthritis pain, as well as for numbness of the hands and feet.  Limited investigation indicates that ji xue teng may be anti-inflammatory and may lower blood pressure.  A decoction is used in the treatment of stomach aches, breathlessness, anemia in women, menstrual irregularities, vaginal discharge (bloody discharge and leukorrhea), numbness and paralysis, backache and pain in the knees, seminal emission, gonorrhea and stomach ache.  The plant is used as a tonic to induce the growth of red blood cells.  The plant contains the antitumor compound rotenone.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_IJK.htm
http://www.crescentbloom.com/Plants/Specimen/MI/Millettia%20reticulata.htm
http://www.learn2grow.com/plants/millettia-reticulata/
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Millettia_reticulata_-_Villa_Taranto_(Verbania)_-_DSC03727.JPG
http://plantfinder.sunset.com/sunset/plant-details.jsp;jsessionid=4480AF3819EAEBA7175464241110C55E?id=1919

http://www.plantsofperfection.com/Plant_descriptions/Millettia_reticulata.html

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Millettia+reticulata

 

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