Tag Archives: Uttar Pradesh

Aconitum balfourii

Botanical Name :Aconitum balfourii
Family :Ranunculaceae
Subfamily :Trollioideae
Genus :Aconitum
Tribe :Delphinieae
Order :Ranunculales
Synonyms :A.atrox
Common Name :Vatsnabha, Monk’s hood, Midhavis, Meetha-tellia, Banwa.

Habitat: E. Asia – Himalayas from Nepal to Tibet at an elevation of 2200 – 4000 metres. Found in the upper subalpine areas in open positions on rocky slopes.This species has a restricted global distribution occuring in the Himalayan region across India and Nepal between an altitude range of 3000-4000 m. Within India, it has been recorded in Uttar Pradesh (Garhwal and Kumaon range).

click to see the map of it’s availability


Description:

Herbs perennial or annual , sometimes subshrubs or herbaceous or woody vines . Leaves basal and cauline, alternate, rarely opposite or whorled , simple or variously compound , palmately nerved, rarely penninerved , with or without stipules. Inflorescence a simple or compound monochasium, dichasium, simple or compound raceme, or flowers solitary. Flowers bisexual , sometimes unisexual , actinomorphic , rarely zygomorphic, hypogynous. Sepals 3–6 or more, free , petaloid or sepaloid , imbricate or sometimes valvate in bud. Petals present or absent, 2–8 or more, free, usually with nectaries. Stamens numerous , rarely few, free; filaments linear or filiform ; anthers latrorse , introrse , or extrorse ; sometimes some sterile stamens becoming staminodes. Carpels numerous or few, rarely 1, free, rarely connate to various degrees ; ovary with 1 to many ovules. Fruit follicles or achenes, rarely capsules or berries . Seeds small, with abundant endosperm and minute embryo.

click to see the pictures…....(01)......(1).……..(2)..…….…(3).……….(4).….…..

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:Aconitum balfourii     hrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. Grows well in open woodlands. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year

Medicinal Uses:
Analgesic;  AntiinflammatoryAntirheumaticVermifuge. Used in Ayurveda, Folk, Tibetian, Unani and Sidha

The tuber is used in Tibetan medicine where it is considered to have an acrid and sweet taste with a heating potency – it is also very poisonous. The root is analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic and vermifuge. It dries up serous fluids and is used in the treatment of all types of pain and inflammation from gout or arthritis, all disorders due to worms or micro-organisms, amnesia, loss of bodily heat, leprosy and paralysis.

Known Hazards : The whole plant is highly toxic – simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aconitum%20balfourii
http://envis.frlht.org/junclist.php?txtbtname=Drosera+indica+L.&gesp=44%7CAconitum+balfourii+STAPF&emailid=&Join=Join
http://envis.frlht.org.in/junclist.php?txtbtname=&gesp=52%7CAconitum+heterophyllum+WALL.+EX+ROYLE
http://zipcodezoo.com/Plants/A/Aconitum_reclinatum/

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Latakasturi

Botanical Name : Abelmoscnus moschatus  Medic
Family :Malvaceae
Genus : Abelmoschus

Species : moschatus

Kingdom: Plantae

Division : Magnolophyta

Class :Magnoliopsida

order : Malvales

Common Names:
•English : Musk mallow, Ambrette seed Plant
•Hindi : Latakasturi, Maskdana
•Kannada : Kadukasturi
•Malayalam : Latakasuri Kattukasturi, Kasturiveta
•Sanskrit : Latakasturika
•Tamil : Vattrilaikkasturi, Kattukkasturi
•Telugu : Kasturibendavittu

Habitat :
This species is native to the old world tropics, globally distributed in the Paleotropics. Within India, it is found throughout Peninsular India and in Himalayan foothills. It is cultivated in Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh & Bangladesh.

Description:
An erect hirsute or hispid annual herb, 60 – 180 cm in height; leaves simple, of varying shapes, usually palmately 3-7 lobed, lobes narrow-acute or oblong-ovate, crenate, serrate or irregularly toothed, hairy on both surfaces: flowers large, yellow with purple centre; fruits fulvous-hairy, capsular: seeds many, subreniform, black or grayish brown, scented.

You may click to see the pictures of  Latakasturi

Chemical Constituents:
-D-glucoside, myricetin b-Sitosterol and its b and its glucoside obtained from leaves and petals; dry fruit husk yielded only -sitosterol b

Medicinal Uses:
Used In Ayurveda, Folk and Unani for treating different diseases like the following:.
*Tastelessness
*Mouth related ailments
*Indigestion
*Loss of appetite
*Diarrhea
*Cough, cold and asthma
*Dysurea
*Gonorrhea
*Decreased sperm count
*Erectile dysfunction
*Eyes related ailments

Powder of seeds is being used in ailments related to oral cavity, digestion and diarrhea. It is also used in heart related problems, respiratory troubles and asthma. It is used in urine related problems and diseases like gonorrhea. It works as aphrodisiac agent also. Powder is also being used in eye related troubles

Lata kasturi is kapha and pitta suppressant. It helps in purification of the mouth and improves taste of the mouth. It improves digestive activities in the body. It is effective in diarrhea. It helps in heart muscles toning. Respiration system is also checked by it and helps in expelling out the extra amount of mucus in the tract. It also helps in checking out the urinary tract and its related ailments. It is widely used as aphrodisiac agents it improves sperm counts and erectile dysfunction.

According to ayurveda it contains
•Gunna (properties) – ruksh (dry), tikshan (sharp) and laghu (light)
•Rasa (taste) – tickt (bitter), katu (pungent) and madhur (sweet)
•Virya (potency) – sheet (cold)

You may click to see :
Abelmoschus moschatus (Malvaceae), an aromatic plant, suitable for medical or food uses to improve insulin sensitivity.:

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.ayushveda.com/herbs/abelmoschus-moschatus.htm
http://envis.frlht.org.in/botanical_search.php?txtbtname=&gesp=7%7CAbelmoschus+moschatus+MEDIK.
http://vaniindia.org.whbus12.onlyfordemo.com/herbal/plantdir.asp
http://www.ishanherbotechorganic.com/herbsbybotanical.html
http://plants.jstor.org/visual/pdig00001725

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Abelia Triflora

 

Botanical Name:Abelia triflora
Family:
Caprifoliaceae
Genus:
Abelia
Species :
Abelia triflora
United :
Plantae
Division :
Magnoliophyta
Order :
Dipsacales

Synonyms: Zabelia triflora – (Wall.)Makino.

Habitat:E. Asia – N.W. HimalayasDry scrub and rocky slopes in calcareous soils, 1200 – 4200 metres in Uttar Pradesh.

Description:
It is a perennial decidious Shrub .It grows to a height of 4m and 3m in width. It has oval foliage that is green. It produces flowers during mid summer that are tubular in shape and white and pink in colour.
It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower in June.  The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs).
.You may click to. see the pictures of Abelia Triflora.

Large shrub or small tree, vigorous and erect in habit, with deeply ridged bark and deciduous, ovate, dark green leaves, to 3in (8cm) long. Small, very fragrant, pink-tinged white flowers, 1/2 in (1.5cm) long, with 5-lobed, bronze-red, narrowly segmented calyces, are produced in threes from the upper leaf axils, in clusters to 2in (5cm) across, in summer. N.W. Himalayas.

Cultivation:
Requires a well-drained open loamy soil11 in a warm, sheltered sunny positionRH245. Plants are best grown in semi-shade219. They are intolerant of water-loggingRHand of dry soils219. Succeeds in any soil but new growth is less vigorous in dry soils202. One report says that the plant likes a soil with a high chalk content245, though another says that chlorosis occurs on very alkaline soils202. This species is hardy to about -15°c184, it grows well in the open at Kew11. A fairly slow-growing plant, it is shy to flower in British gardens unless placed against a sunny wall219. It flowers on wood that is 2 – 3 years old or older182. Another report says that the plant flowers on the new wood219, whilst another says that it flowers on terminal clusters245. Any pruning is best done immediately after flowering by thinning out the old wood.182219. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungusRH, Closely related to A buddleioides and A. umbellata182. The flowers are wonderfully scented182, with the fragrance of vanilla245.

Propagation:-
Seed – we have no specific information for this plant, but suggest sowing the seed in early spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 -10cm with a slight heel, July in pots of sandy soil in a frame11. Takes 3 – 4 weeks. Very easy, a good percentage of the cuttings root78. Cuttings of mature wood, 7 – 10cm with a heel if possible, November in a cold frame. High percentage78. Layering young shoots.

Medicinal Uses: Nothing known.

Other Uses:-
Wood.

Wood – hard, close and even-grained. Used for walking sticks.

Scented Plants
Flowers: Fresh
The flowers are wonderfully scented, with the fragrance of vanilla.

It is notable for its striking scent. A relatively unusual abelia but one of the most beautiful with extremely scented flowers.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Abelia+triflora
http://www.gardenology.org/wiki/Abelia_triflora
http://www.greenfingers.com/gardenbase/plant/view.asp?id=29
http://www.google.co.in/imgres?imgurl=http://www.esveld.nl/plantdias/63/63177.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.esveld.nl/htmldiaen/a/abtrif.htm&h=700&w=453&sz=198&tbnid=ZOAChRZiuTLINM:&tbnh=140&tbnw=91&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpictures%2Bof%2BAbelia%2Btriflora%2Bplant&hl=en&usg=__qHHOiiZnEH4P03WCHlDUwhe7AK0=&ei=kYsrS-td0YeQBfSl8e8I&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=3&ct=image&ved=0CBEQ9QEwAg

 

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Tulsi to The Envournmental Rescue

….TULSI->.
Will This Wonderful Herb Save the Taj Mahal From Environmental Pollution?

Tulsi, commonly called “sacred” or “holy basil,” is a principle herb of Ayurveda, India‘s ancient holistic health system. In India, the Tulsi herb has been widely known for its health-promoting properties — for body, mind, and spirit — for over 5,000 years.

What is Tulsi?
In India the Tulsi herb is worshipped as a sacred plant. It is a part of Indian households, typically grown in earthen pots in the family home or garden. It is also an important part of India’s holistic health system and because of its potential health benefits, it has been for centuries.

Tulsi is rich in antioxidants and contains hundreds of beneficial compounds known as phytochemicals. These compounds possess potential adaptogenic properties, which means they may help your body adapt to and resist stress, as well as immune-enhancing properties that may help promote your general health.

It’s because of these numerous and wide-ranging benefits that I now recommend Tulsi tea as a delicious and healthy alternative to coffee. But there was something else that really drew me to one company in particular, Organic India.

This company, which manufactures Original Tulsi Tea Mix and Holy Basil Capsules, is committed to helping preserve and enrich the environment, and their latest endeavor with the Taj Mahal is evidence of that.

How Can Tulsi Help the Taj Mahal?
The Taj Mahal, the 17th century monument that is now revered as the finest example of Muslim art in India, is being constantly bombarded by air pollution. In fact, its white marble walls are now turning yellow, the result of airborne particles that are being deposited there.

Among the main culprits are automobiles and industry, which release high levels of sulfur dioxide emissions. When sulfur dioxide combines with oxygen and moisture, it contributes to a destructive fungus referred to as “marble cancer,” which corrodes the marble.

Now, a joint exercise being undertaken by the Uttar Pradesh Forest Department and Organic India will plant 1 million Tulsi saplings near the Taj Mahal in an effort to protect it from this environmental pollution.

Why Tulsi?
Organic India’s CEO Krishan Gupta explains:
“It is one of the best plants which purifies the environment. Its cleansing action is due to its property to release high amounts of oxygen, which minimizes the adverse impact of industrial and refinery emission.”

Organic India has committed to providing 1 million Tulsi saplings to plant near the Taj Mahal and in the surrounding city, this year.

Already, saplings have been distributed free of charge in the city by forest officials, and local people and schools were encouraged to participate in the plantation drive.

This is just the type of solution I like most: simple and natural, yet extremely effective and powerful.

Forest officials believe Tulsi will be able to absorb harmful gasses from the air and serve to insulate the area from environmental pollution. Plus, because Tulsi has such esteemed religious significance in India, they are confident that people in the area will care for the plants.

You may click to know more about Organic India

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

Reuters.com May 15, 2007
Unesco.org July 2000
Decan Herald February 4, 2009

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Pathar Chur (Coleus Barbatus Mainmul)

Botanical Name: Coleus barbatus  Mainmul
Family: mint family (Lamiaceae)
Common Name: Coleus, Gundeer, Pakhan bed, Juntiyana, Coleus barbatus Benth
Trade Name :  Pathar chur

Habitat:Growing wild on the Indian plains and the lower Himalayas on sun-exposed arid and semi-arid hill slopes of Uttar Pradesh (India) where it thrives from Simla eastward to Sikkim and Bhutan, the Deccan Plateau, the Eastern Ghats, the Eastern Plateau and the rainshadow regions of the Western Ghats in India. It has also been cultivated as an ornamental plant around the world and its root is used as a spice in Thailand, Myanmar and throughout Southeastern Asia. Makandi is one of 150 Coleus species commonly cultivated, but among a very few of these the roots (and to a lesser extent, the stems) of C. forskohlii are used for therapeutic purposes. In 1973, researchers first isolated the diterpene Forskolin from its roots, making it the only plant source thus far known for the substance.

Description:
It is a perennial, branched, aromatic herb. The entire plant is aromatic (whether fresh or dried). Members of the genus have square stems, branched, and the nodes are often hairy. The pale blue corolla is bilabiate, the lower lobes are elongated and concave, and it grows to a height of 30 cm to 62 cm. The roots are thick, tuberous, fasiculated, up to 20 cm long and 0.5-2.5 cm thick, and are conical, fusiform, straight and strongly aromatic. Leaves appear when the plant becomes pubescent, and are narrowed into petioles. Flowers vary from a very showy bluish to pale lavender. Racemes are perfect, the calyx is fine toothed and deflexed in the front. The plant possesses four parted ovaries. The leaves and tubers have quite different odors, the latter being reminiscent of ginger.
click to see the picture...(01)....(1)...…(2).…...(3).…(4).….…………
Cultivation : It grows well in red sandy loam soil. Plants grow well in hot,humid climate and tropical and sub tropical situation under irrigation.

Propagation : Seeds, Roots

Click for:->  More Details

Chemical Constituents : Forskolin

Medicinal Uses: This Herb decreases the blood pressure, cough, heart diseases etc
Coleus barbatus (C. forskohlii) is used medicinally in Africa, Arabia, and Brazil. The root tubers of the plant are prepared and eaten as a condiment in India. Other Indian Coleus spp. are used in traditional Ayurvedic healing. Chemical studies of alcoholic extracts of the tubers of C. barbatus led to isolation of the labdane diterpene forskolin (coleonol), which has become an important research tool in studying the roles of the enzyme adenylate cyclase and cyclic-AMP in cellular physiology. The compound may eventually become a useful drug in treating hypertension, glaucoma, asthma, and certain cancers. This article summarizes the investigations ofC. barbatus.

Click to see:-> MORE USES :

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.springerlink.com/content/r770360k71767484/
http://apmab.ap.nic.in/products.php?&start=10#
http://www.holisticseek.com/articles.php?te_mode=view&te_key=98

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