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Yoga

Yoga Helps In Increasing Your Height Too

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In trying to increase your desired height, have you done anything and everything just to attain it?   Have tried all the pills who promised to increase your height in no time. You have seen all the herbs and medicines’ TV commercials that will increase your height. Well, maybe you have not tried everything. There is a way to increase your height that is very effective that people always forget. Yoga.

There are 4 famous yoga routines that helps in gaining the desired height you’ve been dreaming of:-

Trikona-asana (Triangle pose)..click to see

You start at a standing position with your feet kept apart. Twist your right foot in the outward direction and raise your hands on your side to reach a ninety degrees angles from your waist. Twisting your chest for you to be able to touch your right foot with your right arm. You need to rotate starting from your waist and point your left hand in an upward position at the same time. Do not forget to exhale after you have done the routine and going back to the original position and repeating same steps starting with your left hand. After performing this routine, your full body will be stretched.

Marjar-asana (Cat Stretch)…click to see

Start with your hands, knees and your palms flat on the floor. Take a deep breath. While stretching your neck and face upward, lower you stomach going to the floor. Keep in this position for a couple of seconds. Exhale and do the same routine in reverse. Doing the stretching of your spinal cord routine regularly can increase your height.

Karnapid-asana…click to see

This exercise can be done only after doing the stretching exercise. You need to lie down and raise your feet to 90 degrees angle. You need to lower both legs in the direction of your head so it can both land on the sides of your head.

Bhujang-asana (Cobra Pose)...click to see

Lying on your stomach keeping the palms of your hand flat on the floor and start lifting your shoulders and head off the floor. Then raising your upper body, utilizing your arms for support. Lower down your forehead on the floor and back to the original position. This will help stretch your vertebra not only to gain height but also improve your flexibility.

Source:Yoga.com

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Spinal Stenosis

Vertebral column.
Image via Wikipedia

Definition
Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the lumbar (back) or cervical (neck) spinal canal, which causes compression of the nerve roots.This can cause weakness in your extremities as narrowing often results in pressure on the spinal cord and/or nerves. Spinal stenosis can occur in a variety of ways in the spine. Most cases of spinal stenosis occur in the lower back (lumbar spine) and will affect the sciatic nerve, which runs along the back of the leg.

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The most commonly referred to types of this condition are: lumbar spinal stenosis, occurring in the lower back, and cervical spinal stenosis which occurs in the neck. As mentioned previously, the condition more commonly occurs in the lower back.

Causes
Spinal stenosis mainly affects middle-aged or elderly people. It may be caused by osteoarthritis or Paget’s disease or by an injury that causes pressure on the nerve roots or the spinal cord itself.

The three major causes of spinal stenosis are:

Aging – With age, the body’s ligaments (tough connective tissues between the bones in the spine) can thicken. Spurs (small growths) may develop on the bones and into the spinal canal. The cushioning discs between the vertebrae may begin to deteriorate. The facet joints (flat surfaces on each vertebra that form the spinal column) also may begin to thicken. Aging, coupled with secondary changes, is the most common cause of spinal stenosis. Heredity – if the spinal canal is too small at birth, symptoms of spinal stenosis may show in a relatively young person. Structural deformities of the involved vertebrae can cause narrowing of the spinal canal.

Tumors of the spine – Abnormal growths of soft tissue that may affect the spinal canal directly by inflammation or by growth of tissue into the canal. Tissue growth may lead to bone resorption (bone loss due to over activity of certain bone cells) or displacement of bone and the eventual collapse of the supporting framework of the spinal column.

Trauma – accidents and injuries may either dislocate the spine and the spinal canal or cause burst fractures that produce fragments of bone that penetrate the canal.

Paget’s disease of bone – This chronic (long-term) disorder usually results in enlarged and deformed bones. The disease can affect any bone of the body, but is often found in the spine.
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Blood supply – The blood supply that feeds healthy nerve tissue may be diverted to the area of involved bone.

Fluorosis – An excessive level of fluoride in the body. It may result from chronic inhalation of industrial dusts or gases contaminated with fluorides, prolonged ingestion of water containing large amounts of fluorides, or accidental ingestion of fluoride-containing insecticides. The condition may lead to calcified spinal ligaments or softened bones and to degenerative conditions like spinal stenosis.

Symptoms

* Back pain that spreads to the legs
* Difficulty or imbalance when walking
* Leg pain
* Neck pain
* Numbness in the buttocks, thighs, or calves that is worse with standing, walking, or exercise
* Pain in the buttocks, thighs, or calves that is worse with walking or exercise
* Weakness of the legs

Spinal narrowing doesn’t always cause problems. But if the narrowed areas compress the spinal cord or spinal nerves, you’re likely to develop signs and symptoms. These often start gradually and grow worse over time. The most common spinal stenosis symptoms include:

*Pain or cramping in your legs. Compressed nerves in your lower (lumbar) spine can lead to a condition called pseudoclaudication, false claudication or neurogenic intermittent claudication, which causes pain or cramping in your legs when you stand for long periods of time or when you walk. The discomfort usually eases when you bend forward or sit down, but it persists if you continue to stand upright.

Another type of intermittent claudication (vascular claudication) occurs when there’s a narrowing or blockage in the arteries in your legs.

Although both types of claudication cause similar symptoms, they differ in two important ways: Vascular claudication becomes worse when you walk uphill and improves when you stand still. Pseudoclaudication is usually worse when going downhill and gets better when you lean forward or sit down.

*Radiating back and hip pain. A herniated disk can narrow your spinal canal and compress nerves in your lumbar spine, leading to pain that starts in your hip or buttocks and extends down the back of your leg. The pain is worse when you’re sitting and generally affects only one side.

You may also experience numbness, weakness or tingling in your leg or foot. For some people, the radiating pain is a minor annoyance, but for others, it can be debilitating.

* Pain in your neck and shoulders. This is likely to occur when the nerves in your neck (cervical spine) are compressed. The pain may occur only occasionally or it may be chronic, and it sometimes can extend into your arm or hand. In addition, the spinal cord is sometimes compressed, which can result in lower extremity weakness and difficulty walking. You also may experience headaches, a loss of sensation or muscle weakness.

* Loss of balance. Pressure on the cervical spinal cord can affect the nerves that control your balance, resulting in clumsiness or a tendency to fall.

* Loss of bowel or bladder function (cauda equina syndrome). In severe cases, nerves to your bladder or bowel may be affected, leading to partial or complete urinary or fecal incontinence. If you experience either of these problems, seek medical care right away.

Risk factors

Age is the main known risk factor for spinal stenosis. Your risk of this condition increases after age 50.

Also at risk are people with skeletal fluorosis, a sometimes crippling bone disease caused by high levels of fluoride in the body. Although the disease is rare in the United States, several million people worldwide have severe skeletal fluorosis.

Diagnosis
Spinal stenosis can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms are often intermittent and because they resemble those of many age-related conditions. To help diagnose spinal stenosis and rule out other disorders, your doctor will ask about your medical history and perform a physical exam that may include checking your peripheral pulses, range of motion and leg reflexes.

You’re also likely to have one or more of the following tests:

* Spinal X-ray. Although an X-ray isn’t likely to confirm that you have spinal stenosis, it can help rule out problems that cause similar symptoms, including a fracture, bone tumor or inherited defect.
* Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In many cases, this is the imaging test of choice for diagnosing spinal stenosis. Instead of X-rays, an MRI uses a powerful magnet and radio waves to produce cross-sectional images of your back. The test can detect damage to your disks and ligaments, as well as the presence of tumors.
* Computerized tomography (CT) scan. This test uses a narrow beam of radiation to produce detailed, cross-sectional images of your body, including the shape and size of your spinal canal. Because you receive more radiation from a CT scan than from a regular X-ray, you should avoid this test if you’re pregnant.
* CT myelogram. This may be the most sensitive test for detecting spinal stenosis, but because it poses more risks than either MRI or CT, it may not be your doctor’s first choice. If you’re contemplating surgery, however, your doctor may recommend a CT myelogram to assess the severity of the stenosis. In a myelogram, a contrast dye is injected in your spinal column. The dye then circulates around your spinal cord and spinal nerves. A myelogram can show herniated disks, bone spurs and tumors.
* Bone scan. In this test, a small amount of a radioactive material that attaches to bone is injected into a vein in your arm. The material emits waves of radiation that are detected by a gamma camera. The camera then produces images of your bones. In a sense, a bone scan is the opposite of a standard X-ray, in which radiation passes through your body to create an image on film. A bone scan can detect a number of bone disorders, but often can’t distinguish among them. For that reason, it’s usually performed with other tests.
* Other diagnostic procedures
. Sometimes your doctor may inject you with a spinal nerve block or epidural steroids. If your symptoms improve after the injection, spinal stenosis is likely the cause of your discomfort. The problem with this approach is that a negative finding doesn’t mean you don’t have spinal stenosis.

Treatment
Generally, conservative management is encouraged. This involves the use of anti-inflammatory medications, other pain relievers, and possibly steroid injections. If the pain is persistent and does not respond to these measures, surgery is considered to relieve the pressure on the nerves.

Surgery is performed on the neck or lower back, depending on the site of the nerve compression.

The recommended treatment for spinal stenosis is generally open back surgery with high risks, hospital stays and lengthy recuperation time. Laser-assisted surgical procedures can correct the causes of spinal stenosis and relieve painful symptoms. These procedures are called a Foraminotomy or a Laminotomy. These laser spine procedures will remove the portion of the disc or bone spur that is pressing against a nerve causing the symptoms of spinal stenosis. By removing or shrinking the disc with the laser and removing any bone spurs, we can decompress the spinal cord or nerve root that is being impinged. At this point, excess disc material is removed and the symptoms of spinal stenosis typically disappear

Complications of spinal stenosis may include:

* Loss of feeling. Depending on which nerves are compressed, spinal stenosis may cause a loss of feeling in your arms, hands, feet or legs. As a result, cuts or wounds may become seriously infected because you’re not aware of them.
* Loss of bladder or bowel control. In addition, spinal stenosis sometimes interferes with bowel or bladder function — a problem that can affect your quality of life.
* Degenerative changes. Although treatment can relieve symptoms of spinal stenosis, it doesn’t stop degenerative changes. Some of these changes, such as muscle atrophy, may be permanent, even after the pressure is relieved.

Other Complications:Injury can occur to the legs or feet due to lack of sensation. Infections may get worse because pain related to them may not be felt. Changes caused by nerve compression may be permanent, even if the pressure is relieved.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of spinal stenosis.

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Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000441.htm#Definition
http://www.laserspineinstitute.com/back_problems/spinal_stenosis/
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/spinal-stenosis/

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Ailmemts & Remedies

Banish Back Pain

Most back pain can be treated without surgery……CLICK & SEE

Your spine truly is a marvel of engineering, a strong yet flexible column that supports your head and pro­tects the delicate cord carrying nerves from the brain to the rest of your body.

The spine’s complexity is also the reason back problems are so common. Eight out of 10 Americans will experience lower-back pain at some point, and back pain is the single largest cause of workers’ compensation claims. The costs—in medical treatment and time lost—add up to more than $50 billion annually.

Most back pain will ease with proper diagnosis and treatment. Experts estimate that less than 2 percent of patients with chronic back pain need surgery. That option should be used only as a last resort.

Back pain falls into two categories: acute and chronic. Acute back injuries include tears to the capsule of the discs that cushion the upper vertebrae; hernias, which affect the gelatinous center of the discs; and sprains, which stretch the ligaments connecting the vertebrae. Avoid activities that involve lifting, bending, or twisting. Gentle activities like walking can help speed healing and reduce swelling around an injury. Analgesic medications such as acetaminophen are safe for short-term use. Acute back pain almost always disappears within several weeks.

Chronic back pain is the kind that lasts longer than three months. Most cases are caused by improper alignment of the vertebrae or pelvis, which puts pressure on the nerves. This may cause stiffness or pain in the lower back or pain that radiates into the buttocks or back of the legs (sciatica).

Here are some common causes of chronic pain, and simple strategies to help.

Obesity, especially abdominal fat, which pulls the pelvis and lumbar spine forward and downward. The obvious solution: Lose weight.

Poor posture, especially during prolonged sitting, such as working at a desk or driving. To correct the problem, stay conscious of your posture. Change the way you stand, sit, or walk. You may need guidance from a physical therapist or exercise physiologist.
Degeneration of normal structures such as ligaments, discs, and bones of the spine. This is common among smokers but also can occur as a result of chronic inflammation from arthritis. If you smoke, quitting is critical for your overall health and can go far in preventing long-term degeneration of the back.
For many conditions, it’s helpful to do daily back exercises that stretch key muscles and strengthen the abdominal core.

You may click to see->Natural Cure For Back Pain

Written by Dr. Mark Liponis, PARADE Magazine

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

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Diagnonistic Test

Back X-Rays (Spine X-Rays)

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Alternative Names:Vertebral radiography; X-ray – spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films

Definition:
Doctors have used x-rays for over a century to see inside the body in order to diagnose a variety of problems, including cancer, fractures, and pneumonia. During this test, you usually stand in front of a photographic plate while a machine sends x-rays, a type of radiation, through your body. Originally, a photograph of internal structures was produced on film; nowadays, the image created by the x-rays goes directly into a computer. Dense structures, such as bone, appear white on the x-ray films because they absorb many of the x-ray beams and block them from reaching the plate. Hollow body parts, such as lungs, appear dark because x-rays pass through them. (In some other countries, like the United Kingdom, the colors are reversed, and dense structures are black.)

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Vertebral radiography; X-ray – spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films. Doctors use back x-rays to examine the vertebrae in the spine for fractures, arthritis, or spine deformities such as scoliosis, as well as for signs of infection or cancer. X-rays can be taken separately for the three areas of the spine: the cervical spine (neck), thoracic spine (middle back), and lumbar spine (lower back). Occasionally, doctors x-ray the pelvis to help diagnose the cause of back pain.
How do you prepare for the test?
You have to remove all clothing, undergarments, and jewelry from your upper body. You may be asked to wear a hospital gown.
Inform the health care provider if you are pregnant.

How the Test is Performed

The test is performed in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider’s office by an x-ray technician. You will lie on the x-ray table and assume various positions. If the x-ray is to determine an injury, care will be taken to prevent further injury.

The x-ray machine will be positioned over the thoracic area of the spine. You will hold your breath as the picture is taken, so that the picture will not be blurry. Usually 2 or 3 views are needed.

What happens when the test is performed?
You either stand or lie down while a technician takes the x-rays. He or she positions you against the photographic plate (which looks like a large board) to get the clearest pictures. A front view and a side view are usually taken.

For cervical spine x-rays, the technician tells you to open your mouth as wide as you can before taking some of the pictures; this is done to avoid having your teeth block the view of the bones at the top of your spine.

The technician leaves the room or stands behind a screen while controlling the x-ray camera. To avoid a blurred image, he or she tells you to remain as still as possible, including holding your breath, before taking each picture.
Th test causes no discomfort. The table may be cold.

Why the Test is Performed?
The x-ray helps evaluate bone injuries, disease of the bone, tumors of the bone, or cartilage loss.

What risks are there from the test?
There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most experts feel that the risk is low compared with the benefits as The amount of radiation from x-ray tests is too small. Pregnant women and children are more sensitive to the risks of the x-ray as the radiation may be harmful to a developing fetus.

Must you do anything special after the test is over?
Nothing.

How long is it before the result of the test is known?
Although digital images are often available immediately, it may take additional time for a doctor to examine them. You’ll probably get the results later in the day.

Considerations:
The x-ray will not detect problems in the muscles, nerves, and other soft tissues, because they can’t be seen well on an x-ray.

Resources:
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diagnostic-tests/back-x-rays.htm
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003806.htm

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Diagnonistic Test

Computed Tomography (CT Scan) for Back Problems

The prototype CT scanner
Image via Wikipedia

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Definition:
Computed tomography (CT) scan, also called computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan, is used to create cross-sectional images of structures in the body. In this procedure, x-rays are taken from many different angles and processed through a computer to produce a three-dimensional (3-D) image called a tomogram.

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CT scans are pictures taken by a specialized x-ray machine. The machine circles your body and scans an area from every angle within that circle. The machine measures how much the x-ray beams change as they pass through your body. It then relays that information to a computer, which generates a collection of black-and-white pictures, each showing a slightly different “slice” or cross-section of your internal organs. Because these “slices” are spaced only about a quarter-inch apart, they give a very good representation of your internal organs and other structures. Doctors use CT scans to evaluate all major parts of the body, including the abdomen, back, chest, and head.

A CT scan is not a very common test to have done for back problems. It does a better job showing the abdominal internal organs than showing details of the bones in the spine. But some back pain is caused by problems in these internal organs, such as the pancreas or the kidney. The CT scan is an excellent way to examine these organs. Also, the CT scan can be combined with a test called a “myelogram” (discussed separately) to give a clear view of the spinal cord and places where the vertebral bones might be pinching it.

Why It Is Done
A CT scan of the spine is done to:

*Look at the bones of the spine (vertebrae).

*Find problems of the spine, such as tumors, fractures, deformities, infection, or narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis).

*Find a herniated disc of the spine.

*Check to see if osteoporosis has caused compression fractures.

*Check on problems of the spine that have been present since birth (congenital).

*Look at problems seen during a standard X-ray test.

*Check how well spinal surgery or therapy is working for a spine problem.

How do you prepare for the test?
If you are having an abdominal CT scan, you might have to fast 2–4 hours before your test. You also may have to drink a large quantity of oral contrast, a fluid that will show up on the CT scan and help define the lining of some internal organs. Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to x-ray contrast dyes, may be pregnant, or have diabetes and take insulin. Insulin can cause hypoglycemia after missing a meal.

What happens when the test is performed?
The test is done in the radiology department of a hospital or in a diagnostic clinic. You wear a hospital gown and lie on your back on a table that can slide back and forth through the donut-shaped CT machine.

During the test, you will lie on a table that is attached to the CT scanner, which is a large doughnut-shaped machine. The CT scanner sends X-rays through the body. Each rotation of the scanner takes a second and provides a picture of a thin slice of the organ or area being studied. One part of the scanning machine can tilt to follow the curve of your spine. All of the pictures are saved as a group on a computer. They also can be printed.

In some cases, a dye (contrast material) may be put in a vein (IV) in your arm or into the spinal canal (intrathecally). The dye make structures and organs easier to see on the CT pictures. The dye may be used to check blood flow and to look for tumors, areas of inflammation, or nerve damage.

The technologist moves the table with a remote control to enable the CT machine to scan your body from all of the desired angles. You will be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds each time a new level is scanned. The technologist usually works the controls from an adjoining room, watching through a window and sometimes speaking to you through a microphone. A CT scan takes about 30–45 minutes. Although it’s not painful, you might find it uncomfortable if you don’t like to lie still for extended periods.

How It Feels
You will not have pain during the scan. The table you lie on may feel hard and the room may be cool. It may be hard to lie still during the test.

Some people feel nervous inside the CT scanner.

If a medicine to help you relax (sedative) or a dye (contrast material) is used, an IV is usually put in your hand or arm. You may feel a quick sting or pinch when the IV is started. The dye may make you feel warm and flushed and give you a metallic taste in your mouth. Some people feel sick to their stomach or get a headache. Tell the technologist or your doctor how you are feeling.

Risk Factors:

The chance of a CT scan causing a problem is small. The contrast dye used in the test can damage your kidneys, especially if they are already impaired by disease.However, some newer dyes are less likely to cause kidney injuries. If kidney damage does occur, this is usually temporary, although in some rare cases it becomes permanent. If you are allergic to the dye used in the procedure, you may get a rash or your blood pressure may drop enough to make you feel faint until you get treatment. As with x-rays, there is a small exposure to radiation. The amount of radiation from a CT scan is greater than that from regular x-rays, but it’s still too small to be likely to cause harm unless you’re pregnant.
If you have diabetes or take metformin (Glucophage), the dye may cause problems. Your doctor will tell you when to stop taking metformin and when to start taking it again after the test so you will not have problems.You may have nausea or vomiting after the test.

There is a small chance of an infection at the needle site on your spine or bleeding into the space around the spinal cord.Intrathecal injections may cause a headache. On rare occasions, seizures may occur after an injection of intrathecal contrast material.

There is a slight chance of developing cancer from having tests that use radiation. The chance is higher in children or people who have many radiation tests. If you are concerned about this risk, talk to your doctor about the amount of radiation this test may give you or your child and confirm the test is needed.

Must you do anything special after the test is over?
Nothing.

Results
A computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pictures of the spine and vertebrae in the neck (cervical spine), upper back (thoracic spine), or lower back (lumbosacral spine).

The radiologist may discuss the CT scan with you right after the test. However, complete results usually are ready for your doctor in 1 to 2 days.

If you face any problem After the test is over
Call 911 or other emergency services immediately if you have a seizure.

Call your doctor immediately if you:

*Have pain, weakness, or numbness in your legs.
*Have a severe headache.
*Have a headache that lasts more than 24 hours.
*Feel extremely irritable.
*Have problems urinating or having a bowel movement.
*Develop a fever.

What Affects the Test
The following may stop you from having the test or may change the test results:

*Pregnancy. CT scans are not usually done during pregnancy.

*Barium and bismuth used for another test. These substances show up on a CT scan. If a CT scan of the lower back is needed, it should be done before any tests that use barium, such as a barium enema.

*Metal objects in the body. These items, such as surgical clips or metal in joint replacements, may prevent a clear view of the body area.

*You are not able to lie still during the test.

What To Think About
*Sometimes your CT test results may be different than those from other types of X-ray tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound scans because the CT scan provides a different view.

*CT results are often compared to positron emission tomography (PET) results to help find cancer. Some new scanners do both scans at the same time.

*MRI may give more information than a CT scan about the spinal discs and spinal cord. For more information, see the medical test Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

*When a CT scan of the spine is done with a myelogram, it is called a CT myelogram. An MRI of the spine is often done in place of a CT myelogram. For more information, see the medical test Myelogram.

Resources:
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diagnostic-tests/ct-scan-for-back-problems.htm
http://www.neurologychannel.com/diagnostictests/CTscan.shtml
http://health.yahoo.com/nervous-diagnosis/computed-tomography-ct-scan-of-the-spine/healthwise–tu6220.html

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