Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Coccydynia

Definition:
Coccydynia is a medical term meaning pain in the coccyx or tailbone area, usually brought on by sitting too abruptly.
We humans have evolved biologically so much that we tend to forget that we were once animals and had a tail. That is, till we suddenly develop a pain deep down in the cleft between the buttocks, making it difficult to abruptly shift positions, from sitting to standing or getting up after lying down. This pain is called coccydynia.

That last bone in the vertebral column is called a coccyx. It actually is a vestigial tail, which has shrunk over generations. About 2.7 per cent of patients who see a doctor for “backache” actually had pain in the tailbone. It is more likely to occur in physically active youngsters and adults over the age of 40. Women, with their wide pelvis, are more prone to coccodynia.

Coccydynia occurs in the lowest part of the spine, the coccyx, which represents a vestigial tail, or in other words the “tail bone”. The name coccyx is derived from the Greek word for cuckoo due to its beak like appearance. The coccyx itself is made up of 3 to 5 vertebrae, some of which may be fused together. The ventral side of the coccyx is slightly concave whereas the dorsal aspect is slightly convex. Both of these sides have transverse grooves that show where the vestigial coccygeal units had previously fused. The coccyx attaches the sacrum, from the dorsal grooves with the attachment being either a symphysis or as a true synovial joint, and also to the gluteus maximus muscle, the coccygeal muscle, and the anococcygeal ligament.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES:

Symptoms:
Pain and local tenderness at the tailbone are the major symptoms of coccydynia. This can lead to difficulty sitting or leaning against the buttocks. Along with the pain with sitting, there is typically exquisite tenderness at the tailbone area. Coccydynia is also known as coccygodynia, coccygeal pain, coccyx pain, or coccalgia.

Causes:
One way of classifying coccydynia is whether the onset was traumatic versus non-traumatic. In many cases the exact cause is unknown and is referred to as idiopathic coccydynia.

The coccyx is prone to injury. Acute dislocations, sprains and fractures can occur. Usually there is a history of having fallen abruptly, on a staircase, the side of the swimming pool or some other hard surface. It can also occur while cycling or rowing. Chronic injury can occur if work or academics involves sitting for prolonged periods on hard surfaces like a wooden bench or a chair without cushions. In women, the coccyx can be injured during childbirth, especially if labour is prolonged. Overweight and obese men and women are more likely to develop problems with the coccyx.

There are common pathophysiological ways that a person may develop coccydynia. The two main causes for this condition are sudden impact due to fall, and coccydynia caused by childbirth pressure in women. Other ways that coccydynia develops are partial dislocation of the sacrococcygeal synchondrosis that can possibly result in abnormal movement of the coccyx from excessive sitting, and repetitive trauma of the surrounding ligaments and muscles, resulting in inflammation of tissues and pain.

Coccydynia is a fairly common injury which can often result from falls, particularly in leisure activities such as cycling and skateboarding. Coccydynia is often reported following a fall or after childbirth. In some cases, persistent pressure from activities like bicycling may cause the onset of coccyx pain. Coccydynia due to these causes usually is not permanent, but it may become very persistent and chronic if not controlled. Coccydynia may also be caused by sitting improperly thereby straining the coccyx.

Rarely, coccydynia is due to the undiagnosed presence of a sacrococcygeal teratoma or other tumor in the vicinity of the coccyx. In these cases, appropriate treatment usually involves surgery and/or chemotherapy.
Diagnosis:
A number of different conditions can cause pain in the general area of the coccyx, but not all involve the coccyx and the muscles attached to it. The first task of diagnosis is to determine whether the pain is related to the coccyx. Physical rectal examination, high resolution x-rays and MRI scans can rule out various causes unrelated to the coccyx, such as Tarlov cysts and pain referred from higher up the spine. Note that, contrary to most anatomical textbooks, most coccyxes consist of several segments: ‘fractured coccyx’ is often diagnosed when the coccyx is in fact normal or just dislocated at an intercoccygeal joint.

A simple test to determine whether the coccyx is involved is injection of local anesthetic into the area. If the pain relates to the coccyx, this should produce immediate relief.

If the anesthetic test proves positive, then a dynamic (sit/stand) x-ray or MRI scan may show whether the coccyx dislocates when the patient sits.

Use of dynamic x-rays on 208 patients who gave positive results with the anesthetic test showed:

* 31% Not possible to identify the cause of pain
* 27% Hypermobility (excessive flexing of the coccyx forwards and upwards when sitting)
* 22% Posterior luxation (partial dislocation of the coccyx backwards when sitting)
* 14% Spicule (bony spur) on the coccyx
* 5% Anterior luxation (partial dislocation of the coccyx forwards when sitting)

This study found that the pattern of lesions was different depending on the obesity of the patients: obese patients were most likely to have posterior luxation of the coccyx, while thin patients were most likely to have coccygeal spicules.

Angle of incidence:
Sagittal coccygeal movement is measured using the angle of incidence—or the angle at which the coccyx strikes the seat when an individual sits down. A smaller angle indicates the coccyx being more parallel to the seat, resulting in flexion (or “normal” movement) of the coccyx. A larger angle indicates the coccyx being more perpendicular to the seat, causing posterior subluxation (or “backward” movement) of the coccyx. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURE : Stand to Sit Coccyx

Treatment:
Once coccydynia has been diagnosed, conservative treatment can make the pain disappear in 8-12 weeks. This involves sitting in a basin of hot water (sitz bath) for 10-15 minutes at least twice a day. A donut shaped cushion makes sitting during work easier. Inflatable rubber cushions are available which can be carried around. When seated on chairs or in the toilet, try to lean slightly forwards.

Stretches can be done for that area. The two common ones are the kneeling stretch, when you kneel on one leg keeping the other bent at a right angle. After 30 seconds switch sides. The other stretch involves lying down, bending the knees, crossing the legs at the ankle and then pulling the legs towards you with your arms.
You may click & see : BACK PAIN REMEDY.. 

Since sitting on the affected area may aggravate the condition, a cushion with a cutout at the back under the coccyx is recommended. If there is tailbone pain with bowel movements, then stool softeners and increased fiber in the diet may help. For prolonged cases, anti-inflammatory medications such as NSAIDS(non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs) or pain-relieving drugs may be prescribed. The use of anti-depressants such as Elavil (amitriptyline) may help alleviate constant pain. Tailbone pain physicians specializing in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at New Jersey Medical School have published that sometimes even just a single local nerve block injection at the ganglion impar can give 100% relief of coccydynia when performed under fluoroscopic guidance.

Additionally if the pain is caused by a malignment of the coccyx, manipulation by a chiropractor, osteopathic physician (D.O.) or physical therapist can offer relief.

In rare cases, surgery to remove the coccyx (coccygectomy) may be required. Typically, surgery is reserved for patients with cancer (malignancy) or those whose tailbone pain has failed to respond to non-surgical treatment (such as medications by mouth, use of seat cushions, and medications given by local injections done under fluoroscopic guidance, as noted above.

Prevention:
Body positioning and alignment is significant for producing less stress in the coccyx region. Bad posture can influence coccyx pain. People may not realize that they are over stressing their coccyx while doing daily activities. Pain in the coccyx can be caused from many incidents like falling, horseback riding, or even sitting on hard surfaces for a long period of time. The main focus is to prevent coccyx pain from occurring, by correcting everyday activities that contribute to tailbone pain.

Proper equipment used to preventing coccyx pain:
There is no definite way to fully prevent coccyx pain because an accident can occur at any given time. However, people who are obese are at a higher risk for developing coccyx pain. Carrying excessive weight contributes to more stress on the coccyx while sitting down causing increased chances of pain.  Prevention of carrying excessive weight gain can help reduce the tension and pressure on the coccyx. In other words the coccyx for obese people may be more posteriorly outward when they are sitting down.  Avoidance of contact sports like basketball, football, and or hockey can decrease the risks of coccyx pain, because it can help reduce the chances of falling. Another method is proper safety equipment for sports is to prevent coccyx pain. For example, there are hockey pants that provide extra cushion that protect the thigh, coccyx, and buttocks. These results will lead to less falls that can cause trauma to the coccyx.

Stretches & strengthening exercises for prevention:
A kneeling groin stretch can help prevent coccyx pain from occurring after long periods of sitting. The adductor magnus is involved in the kneeling groin stretch, and when it is tight it can contribute to tailbone pain, so stretching can help prevent tailbone pain. Other stretches like piriformis stretch, and hands to feet stretch, can relieve stress off the muscles around the coccyx, after sitting for a long time. These release tension built up around the muscles in the coccyx.
Every part of our body (even the coccyx) needs looking after.

*While cycling on a stationery bike or on the road, make sure the cycle seat is soft and comfortable. Special “cycling innerwear” is available with padding and should be used.

*Do not run on slippery surfaces like the edges of the swimming pool.

*Wear footwear that is rubber soled or has a “grip”, not smooth leather.

*Maintain ideal body weight. This can be calculated as height in metre squared X 23.

*Walk and sit with the correct posture. If you feel you are slouching, stand with both shoulders touching the wall and balance a book on your head.

*Do not sit on hard surfaces for prolonged periods of time.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccydynia
http://www.medicinenet.com/coccydynia/article.htm
http://www.telegraphindia.com/1160201/jsp/knowhow/story_66774.jsp

Advertisements
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Lumbar Spondylosis

Definition:
Lumbar Spondylosis is a condition associated with degenerative changes in the intervertebral discs and facet joints. Spondylosis, also known as spinal osteoarthritis, can affect the lumbar, thoracic, and/or the cervical regions of the spine. Although aging is the primary cause, the location and rate of degeneration is individual. As the lumbar discs and associated ligaments undergo aging, the disc spaces frequently narrow. Thickening of the ligaments that surround the disc and those that surround the facet joints develops. These ligamentous thickening may eventually become calcified. Compromise of the spinal canal or of the openings through which the spinal nerves leave the spinal canal can occur.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Lumbar spondylosis encompasses lumbar disc bulges, herniations, facet joint degeneration, and vertebral bony overgrowths (osteophytes). Degenerative changes, including osteophyte formation, increase with age but are often asymptomatic. Disc herniation is symptomatic when it causes nerve root compression and spinal stenosis. Common symptoms include low back pain, sciatica, and restriction in back movement. Treatment is usually conservative, although surgery is indicated for spinal cord compression or intractable pain. Relapse is common, with patients experiencing episodic back pain.

Symptoms:
Symptoms of lumbar spondylosis follow those associated with each of the various aspects of the disorder: disc herniation, sciatica, spinal stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, and degenerative scoliosis. Pain associated with disc degeneration may be felt locally in the back or at a distance away. This is called referred pain, as the pain is not felt at its site of origin. Lower back arthritis may be felt as pain in the buttock, hips, groin, and thighs. As with spinal stenosis or disc herniation in the lumbar region, it is important to be aware of any bowel or bladder incontinence, or numbness in the perianal area. These signs and symptoms could represent an important massive nerve compression needing surgical intervention (cauda equina syndrome).

Causes:
Spondylosis is mainly caused by ageing. As people age, certain biological and chemical changes cause tissues throughout the body to degenerate. In the spine, the vertebrae (spinal bones) and intervertebral discs degenerate with ageing. the intervertebral discs are cushion like structures that act as shock absorbers between the vertebral bones.

One of the structures that form the discs is known as the annulus fibrosus. The annulus fibrosus is made up of the 60 or more tough circular bands of collagen fiber (called lamellae). Collagen is a type of inelastic fiber. Collagen fibers, along with water and proteoglycans (types of large molecules made of a protein and at least one carbohydrate chain) help to form the soft, gel-like center part of each disk. This soft, center part is known as the nucleus pulposus and is surrounded by the annulus fibrosus.

The degenerative effects of ageing can cause the fibers of the discs to weaken, causing wear and tear. Constant wear and tear and injury to the joints of the vertebrae causes inflammation in the joints. Degeneration of the discs leads to the formation of mineral deposits within the discs. The water content of the center of the disc decreases with age and as a result the discs become hard, stiff, and decreased in size. This, in turn, results in strain on all the surrounding joints and tissues, causing the sensation of stiffness. With less water in the center of the discs, they have decreased shock absorbing qualities. An increased risk of disc herniation also results, which is when the disc abnormally protrudes from its normal position.

Each vertebral body contains four joints that act as hinges. These hinges are known as facet joints or zygapophyseal joints. The job of the facet joins is to allow the spinal column to flex, extend, and rotate. The bones of the facet joints are covered with cartilage (a type of flexible tissue) known as end plates. The job of the end plates is to attach the disks to the vertebrae and to supply nutrients to the disc. When the facet joints degenerate, the size of the end plates can decrease and stiffen. Movement can stimulate pain fibers in the facet joints and annulus fibrosus. Furthermore, the vertebral bone underneath the end plates can become thick and hard.

Degenerative disease can cause ligaments to lose their strength. A ligament is a tough band of tissue that attaches to joint bones. In the spine, ligaments connect spinal structures such as vertebrae and prevent them from moving too much. In degenerative spondylosis, one of the main ligaments (known as the ligamentum flavum) can thicken or buckle, making it weaken.

Knobby, abnormal bone growths (known as bone spurs or osteophytes) can form in the vertebrae. These changes can also cause osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints that is made worse by stress. In more severe cases, these bones spurs can compress nerves coming out of the spinal cord and/or decreased blood supply to the vertebrae. Areas of the body supplied by these nerves may become painful or develop loss of sensation and function.

Carrying around excessive weight can cause lumbar spondylosis. Spending much of the day seated can also be a contributing factor. An injury or trauma to the back can also contribute, as can genetic factors.

The main Risk Factors:
• Age: As a person ages the healing ability of the body decreases and developing arthritis at that time can make the disease progress much faster. Persons over 40 years of age are more prone to developing lumbar spondylosis.

• Obesity: Overweight puts excess load on the joints as the lumbar region carries most of the body’s weight, making a person prone to lumbar spondylosis.

• Sitting for prolonged periods: Sitting in one position for prolonged time which puts pressure on the lumbar vertebrae.

• Prior injury: Trauma makes a person more susceptible to developing lumbar spondylosis.

• Heredity or Family history
Diagnosis:
Physical Examination:
A thorough physical examination reveals much about the patient’s health and general fitness. The physical part of the exam includes a review of the patient’s medical and family history. Often laboratory tests such as complete blood count and urinalysis are ordered. The physical exam may include:

*Palpation (exam by touch) determines spinal abnormalities, areas of tenderness, and muscle spasm.

*Range of Motion measures the degree to which a patient can perform movement of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and spinal rotation.

*A neurologic evaluation assesses the patient’s symptoms including pain, numbness, paresthesias (e.g. tingling), extremity sensation and motor function, muscle spasm, weakness, and bowel/bladder changes. Particular attention may be given to the extremities. Either a CT Scan or MRI study may be required if there is evidence of neurologic dysfunction.

X-rays and Other Tests:
Radiographs (X-rays) may indicate loss of vertebral disc height and the presence of osteophytes, but is not as useful as a CT Scan or MRI. A CT Scan may help reveal bony changes sometimes associated with spondylosis. An MRI is a sensitive imaging tool capable of revealing disc, ligament, and nerve abnormalities. Discography seeks to reproduce the patient’s symptoms to identify the anatomical source of pain. Facet blocks work in a similar manner. Both are considered controversial.

The physician compares the patient’s symptoms to the findings to formulate a diagnosis and treatment plan. The results from the examination provide a baseline from which the physician can monitor and measure the patient’s progress.

Treatment:
Each patient is treated differently for arthritis depending on their individual condition. In the early stages lifestyle modifications or medicines are used for treatment and surgery is needed only if these measures are ineffective.

Yoga:
A few yoga poses and sequences can help lumbar spondylosis. Sun salutations, also known as Surya Namaskar A and B, are good for back strengthening and flexibility. The cobra pose, or Bhjangasana, stretches the lower back. The locust pose, or Shalabhasana, strengthens the lower back because it requires lifting one’s upper and lower body off the ground from a prone position on the floor. Meditation & pranayam 

Exercises:
Physical therapy is often prescribed to relieve problems caused by lumbar spondylosis. Back extensions are used on patients who can tolerate them. The patient lies face down on her stomach and then slowly lifts only her upper body off the floor. The arms may be placed palms down under her chest to take some strain off the back muscles. If lying down is too painful, this exercise can also be done against a wall. The patient puts her hands against a wall, standing about a foot away, and bends back, using a combination of lower back muscles and arms.

Stretches to Avoid:
Lying on the back and bringing the knees into the chest is an example of a common lower back stretch that flexes the spine. This is not recommended for people with lumbar spondylosis. Bending down to touch one’s toes from a standing position is also not recommended. Reaching for the toes while sitting can be problematic, too.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.ehow.com/about_5039006_lumbar-spondylosis-exercises.html
http://www.physiotherapy-treatment.com/lumbar-spondylosis.html

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Lhermitte’s phenomenon

Alternative Name: Barber Chair phenomenon

Definition:

Lhermitte’s phenomenon  is an electrical sensation that runs down the back and into the limbs. In many patients, it is elicited by bending the head forward. It can also be evoked when a practitioner pounds on the posterior cervical spine while the neck is flexed; caused by involvement of the posterior columns

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The Lhermitte’s sign is a symptom rather than a sign as it describes a subjective sensation rather than an objective finding. To add more confusion, it is not attributed to its discoverer. It was first described by Pierre Marie and Chatelin in 1917. Jean Lhermitte did not publish his first report until 1920. However, in 1924 he did publish the seminal article on the subject which resulted in it becoming well known

It’s usually triggered by flexing the neck – that is, bending your head down, chin towards chest. The sensation is short-lived, usually no more than a second.

How often the symptom occurs, and what other symptoms develop along with it, depends on the underlying cause, of which there are several.

Causes:
L’hermitte’s phenomenon is a sign that something may be damaging the spinal cord (especially in the part of it that’s composed of white matter, at the back of the cord). This damage is usually in the neck or region of the spine known as the cervical spine. But the symptom is very non-specific and says nothing about exactly where in the spinal cord the problem is, or what is damaging it.

The most common cause is arthritis of the small joints of the vertebra in that part of the spine, also known as cervical spondylosis. This can cause abnormal pressure on the spinal cord or the nerves coming out of it.

Other causes include:

•Multiple sclerosis
•Vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anaemia)
•Tumours
•Compression of the discs in the cervical spine following trauma
•Radiotherapy to the neck

But in many cases a specific cause for Lhermitte’s phenomenon can’t be found.

Treatment:
It’s important that L’hermitte’s phenomenon is investigated by a specialist to pick up and treat any identifiable cause if possible, and limit or prevent further damage. But in many cases the tests (which may include X-ray of the cervical spine, MRI scans of the brain and cervical spinal cord, lumbar puncture and nerve signal tests known as visual evoked potentials) all come back negative.

When this happens, you should keep an eye on the problem and ask your doctor to repeat the tests if necessary or if symptoms worsen.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lhermitte’s_sign
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/lhermittes.shtml

http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.cfm/fuseaction/show/pageid/755

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Illu_vertebral_column.jpg

Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies

Kyphosis

Alternative Names: Scheuermann’s disease; Roundback; Hunchback; Postural kyphosis

Definition:
Kyphosis is a curving of the spine that causes a bowing or rounding of the back, which leads to a hunchback or slouching posture.

click to see the picture

Some rounding is normal, but the term “kyphosis” usually refers to an exaggerated rounding, more than 50 degrees. This deformity is also called round back or hunchback.

click to see the picture

With kyphosis, your spine may look normal, or you may develop a hump. Kyphosis can occur as a result of developmental problems; degenerative diseases, such as arthritis of the spine; osteoporosis with compression fractures of the vertebrae; or trauma to the spine. It can affect all ages.

In the sense of a deformity, it is the pathological curving of the spine, where parts of the spinal column lose some or all of their lordotic profile. This causes a bowing of the back, seen as a slouching back and breathing difficulties. Severe cases can cause great discomfort and even lead to death.

Causes:

Our spine (vertebral column) is composed of bones (vertebrae), which are held together by tough, fibrous bands (ligaments). The vertebral column consists of seven neck (cervical) vertebrae, 12 middle back (thoracic) vertebrae and five lower back (lumbar) vertebrae. Lumbar vertebrae are the largest, and they carry most of your body’s weight. The sacrum, containing five fused vertebrae, is below the lumbar vertebrae. The last three tiny vertebrae, also fused together, are called the tailbone (coccyx).

Kyphosis is a forward rounding of the vertebrae in your thoracic spine. The vertebrae in your thoracic spine connect to your ribs.

Causes of kyphosis depend on the different types of kyphosis.
click to see

.
Types of kyphosis in children and adolescents
:
For children or adolescents, the most common types include:

*Postural kyphosis. This type mainly becomes apparent in adolescence. The onset of postural kyphosis generally is slow. It’s more common in girls. Poor posture or slouching may cause stretching of the spinal ligaments and abnormal formation of the bones of the spine (vertebrae). Postural kyphosis often is accompanied by an exaggerated inward curve (hyperlordosis) in the lower (lumbar) spine. Hyperlordosis is the body’s way of compensating for the exaggerated outward curve in the upper spine.

*Scheuermann’s kyphosis.
Like postural kyphosis, Scheuermann’s kyphosis typically appears in adolescence, often between ages 10 and 15, while the bones are still growing. Also called Scheuermann disease, it’s slightly more common in boys. Scheuermann’s kyphosis may deform the vertebrae so that they appear wedge shaped, rather than rectangular, on X-rays. There may be another finding, known as Schmorl’s nodes, on the affected vertebrae. These nodes are the result of the cushion (disk) between the vertebrae pushing through bone at the bottom and top of a vertebra (end plates).

The cause of Scheuermann’s kyphosis is unknown, but it tends to run in families. Some people with this type of kyphosis also have scoliosis, a spinal deformity that causes a side-to-side curve. Adults who developed Scheuermann’s during childhood may experience increased pain as they get older.

*Congenital kyphosis
. A malformation of the spinal column during fetal development causes kyphosis in some infants. Several vertebrae may be fused together or the bones may not form properly. This type of kyphosis may worsen as the child grows. In some cases, congenital kyphosis eventually leads to paralysis of the lower body (paraplegia).

.
Causes in adults
:
Disorders that may cause a curvature of the spine in adults, resulting in kyphosis, include:

*Osteoporosis,
a bone-thinning disease that’s associated with fractures of the vertebrae, which cause compression of the spine and contribute to kyphosis
*Degenerative arthritis of the spine, which can cause deterioration of the bones and disks of the spine
*Ankylosing spondylitis, an inflammatory arthritis that affects the spine and nearby joints
*Connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, that may affect the connective tissue’s ability to hold joints in their proper position
*Tuberculosis and other infections of the spine, which can result in destruction of joints
*Cancer or benign tumors that impinge on bones of the spine and force them out of position
*Spina bifida, a birth defect in which part of the spine doesn’t form completely, and which causes defects of the spinal cord and vertebrae
*Conditions that cause paralysis, such as cerebral palsy and polio, and that stiffen the bones of the spine

Symptoms:
•Difficulty breathing (in severe cases)
•Fatigue
•Mild back pain
•Round back appearance
•Tenderness and stiffness in the spine


Diagnosis:

TestsPhysical examination by Your doctor confirms the abnormal curve of the spine. Your doctor will record a history of your condition and conduct a physical exam. The  physical  exam  may include the following:

*Forward bend tes
t. Your doctor asks you to bend forward from the waist while he or she views the spine from the side. With kyphosis, the rounding of the upper back may become more obvious in this position. In postural kyphosis, the deformity corrects itself when you lie on your back.
*Neurological functions test. Although neurological changes accompanying kyphosis are rare, your doctor may check for them by looking for weakness, changes in sensation or paralysis below the site of the kyphosis.
*Spinal imaging tests. Your doctor may take an X-ray to confirm the kyphosis, determine the degree of curvature and detect any deformity of the vertebrae, which helps identify the type of kyphosis. For example, the appearance of wedge-shaped vertebrae or other features on X-ray differentiates between postural kyphosis and Scheuermann’s kyphosis. In older adults, X-rays may show arthritic changes in the spine, which can contribute to an increase in pain. If your doctor suspects a tumor or infection, he or she may request an MRI of your spine.
*Pulmonary function tests. Your doctor may also use breathing tests to assess any breathing difficulty caused by the kyphosis.

The doctor will also look for any nervous system (neurological) changes (weakness, paralysis, or changes in sensation) below the curve.


Other tests may include:

•Spine x-ray
•Pulmonary function tests (if kyphosis affects breathing)
•MRI (if there may be a tumor, infection, or neurological symptoms)

Treatment:

Kyphosis treatment depends on the cause of the condition and the signs and symptoms that are present.

Less serious cases

In some cases, less aggressive types of treatment are appropriate:

*Postural kyphosis. This type of kyphosis doesn’t progress and may improve on its own. Exercises to strengthen back muscles, training in using correct posture and sleeping on a firm bed may help. Pain relievers may help ease discomfort if exercise and physical therapies aren’t fully effective.
*Structural kyphosis. For kyphosis caused by spinal abnormalities, treatment typically depends on your age and sex, the severity of your symptoms and how rigid the curve in your spine is. With Scheuermann’s kyphosis, monitoring for progression of the curvature may be all that’s recommended if you have no symptoms. Anti-inflammatory medications may help relieve pain. General conditioning exercises and physical therapy may help alleviate symptoms.
*Osteoporosis-related kyphosis. Multiple compression fractures in people who have low bone density can lead to abnormal curvature of the spine. If no pain or other complications are present, treatment for the kyphosis may not be necessary. But your doctor may recommend treatment of the osteoporosis to prevent further fractures and worsening of the kyphosis.
More serious cases
More severe cases of kyphosis require more aggressive treatment. The primary approaches are bracing and, as a last resort, surgery. With children and adolescents, the sooner treatment begins, the more effective it may be in halting the deformity.

When bracing is necessary

If your teenager is still growing and has moderate to severe kyphosis, your doctor may recommend bracing. Wearing a brace may slow or prevent further progression of the curvature and may even provide some correction.

There are several types of braces for children who have kyphosis. Your doctor can help you decide which brace would be most effective for your child.

Children who wear braces usually have few restrictions and can participate in most activities. Although a brace may feel uncomfortable and awkward at first, it must be worn as prescribed to be effective. Once the bones are fully grown, your child can be weaned off the brace according to your doctor’s instructions.

There are different types of braces for treating kyphosis in adults, varying from postural training devices to rigid body jackets. The goal of bracing in adults is typically to control pain.

When surgery is necessary

Spinal surgery carries many risks, so your doctor may recommend surgery only if you or your child has any of the following:

*Severe curvature of the spine that doesn’t respond to other treatment measures
*Kyphosis that continues to worsen
*Debilitating pain that doesn’t respond to medication
*Resulting neurological problems, such as paralysis
*Kyphosis related to a tumor or infection
Surgery also may be recommended for an infant with congenital kyphosis, in order to straighten the spine.

The goal of surgery is to reduce the degree of curvature. This is commonly done by fusing or joining the affected vertebrae. Doctors typically perform the surgery through incisions in the back, during general anesthetic.

Fusing the vertebrae involves connecting two or more of them with pieces of bone taken from the pelvis. Eventually, the vertebrae fuse with the bone pieces to prevent further progression of the curvature. Doctors attach metal rods, hooks, screws or wires to the spine to hold the vertebrae together while the bones fuse, which may take several months. Doctors leave the metal in the body to help support the fused area even after the bones have fused.

A drawback of spinal fusion is that it stops growth in that area of the spine. A child’s ultimate height isn’t affected greatly because the leg bones and the unaffected portion of the spine continue to grow normally.

The complication rate for spinal surgery is relatively high. Complications include bleeding, infection, pain, nerve damage, arthritis and disk degeneration. If the surgery fails to correct the problem, a second surgery may be needed.

Other procedures
Procedures called vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty have been developed recently to treat vertebral fractures. These procedures involve injecting a type of inert cement into the affected vertebrae. They can be effective in controlling pain associated with compression .

Coping & Support:
Adolescence is a time when young people are struggling with physical and emotional changes. Having a noticeable spinal deformity or wearing a brace can make this challenging time even more difficult.

Make sure your child has caring people to turn to, including supportive family and friends, or even a professional counselor, if necessary. Consider joining a support group for parents and kids with kyphosis or other spinal deformities to help you and your child connect with others facing similar challenges.

Prognosis:
Adolescents with Scheuermann’s disease tend to do well even if they need surgery, and the disease stops once they stop growing. If the kyphosis is due to degenerative joint disease or multiple compression fractures, surgery is needed to correct the defect and improve pain.


Possible Complications

•Decreased lung capacity
•Disabling back pain
•Neurological symptoms including leg weakness or paralysis
•Round back deformity

Prevention:

Treating and preventing osteoporosis can prevent many cases of kyphosis in the elderly. Early diagnosis and bracing of Scheuermann’s disease can reduce the need for surgery, but there is no way to prevent the disease.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyphosis
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/kyphosis/DS00681
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/9561.htm
http://www.spineuniverse.com/conditions/kyphosis/kyphosis-scheuermanns-disease
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001240.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/backcurves1.shtml

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Exercise

A Proper Downward-facing Dog

[amazon_link asins=’144947876X,0473385589,1633221466,B01I8BHIWU,1449484778,B076ZDL9LD’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9888ff7e-bec1-11e7-8b1e-49a575e6371d’]

STEP-1.

Push back on your feet and straighten your legs as you raise your hips.


STEP-2.

Focus on feeling an evenness over both hands. Then slowly shift your weight onto your left leg. Raise your right leg up as high as you can without twisting your shoulders and hips. Keep the front of your body facing the floor.

If you practice yoga, you’re familiar with downward-facing dog. It’s a traditional pose that requires strength and energy in your arms and shoulders, extension of the spine, and power and stamina in your legs.

From a kneeling position, sit back on your heels. Take your arms to the floor and walk your hands as far forward as possible, keeping them shoulder-width apart. Now come up to all fours, moving your feet hip-width apart. Push back on your feet and straighten your legs as you raise your hips. Lower your head between your upper arms and move your chest toward your thighs, maintaining a straight spine. Lower your heels to the floor as you lift your sitting bones toward the ceiling. Pause for 10 to 20 seconds. Release down to the start position or continue to the more advanced variation.

Focus on feeling an evenness over both hands. Then slowly shift your weight onto your left leg. Raise your right leg up as high as you can without twisting your shoulders and hips. Keep the front of your body facing the floor. Pause for two to three breaths, lower your right leg, shift your weight over it and raise your left leg. Pause for two to three breaths. Lower your leg, bend your knees to all fours and return to the start position.

Source: : Los Angeles Times

Enhanced by Zemanta