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Pausinystalia johimbe

Botanical Name :Pausinystalia johimbe
Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Pausinystalia
Species: P. yohimbe
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms: Coryanthe yohimbe

Common Names:Yohimbe , johimbe, yumbina

Habitat :Pausinystalia johimbe is native to Africa specifically  west Africa.

Description:
Pausinystalia johimbe is an evergreen tree grows to a height of 30m, having fissured bark grey brown in colour and often spoted with lichen.The interior sides of the fissures are typically redder than the outer bark. The erect stems branch heavely with ovate or elliptical leaves roughly 10cm in length.The wiged seeds are delicate and paper thin.

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Chemical Constituents:Ajmaline, corynantheine, corynanthene, quebrachin, tannins, yohimbine

In addition to yohimbine, Yohimbe also contains 55 other alkaloids. Yohimbine accounts for 1-20% of its total alkaloid content. Among the others is corynanthine, an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor blocker. Hence, the use of yohimbe extract in sufficient dosages may provide concomitant alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors blockade and thus may better enhance erections than yohimbine alone.

Medicinal Uses:
The bark of this West African tree may be used as best natural bet for reversing sexual dysfunction, though at the cost of several side effects. Until the advent of Viagra, the most commonly prescribed drug for erection problems was a pharmaceutical isolation of yohimbe’s’ active phytochemical, yohimbine. Called “herbal viagra” by the February 1999 edition of Environmental Nutrition, yohimbe’s power comes from a combination of alkaloids. Alkaloids are organic plant substances that have strong medicinal properties and are frequently used as drugs.

The terms yohimbine, yohimbine hydrochloride, and yohimbe bark extract are related but different. Yohimbe refers to the herb. Yohimbine refers to the active chemical found not only in yohimbe but also in Indian snakewood, periwinkle, quebracho, and niando. For a significant number of men who try it, yohimbe lives up to its reputation as a sexual performance enhancer.

While Yohimbe herb is often thought of for male erectile dysfunction support, most people don’t realize that yohimbe is also effective in women. This herb increases blood flow to the genitals of both males and females giving women an enhanced sensation and engorgement of genital organs. However, keep the dose low to prevent the yohimbe side effects.

Yohimbe is also sold as a muscle building natural version of anabolic steroids. However, it’s action is apparently unrelated to the body’s production of testosterone, which means it probably is of little value in building bigger muscles.

The only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medicine for impotence is yohimbine – an alkaloid isolated from the bark of the yohimbe tree (Pausinystalia yohimbe) native to tropical West Africa. Yohimbine hydrochloride increases libido, but its primary action is to increase blood flow to erectile tissue. Contrary to a popular misconception, yohimbine has no effects on testosterone levels.  When used alone, yohimbine is successful in 34-43 percent of cases.

Side Effects::
Not recommended if one has severe kidney or liver disease. Not to be taken if any one is currently on blood thinning medication, and it is not recommended to be taken for extended periods of time. Side effects can include anxiety, dizziness, rapid heart rate, insomnia, and nausea. Extremely high doses can cause hallucinations and cause muscular dysfunction – do not exceed recommend dosage by doctor. The herb contains compounds capable of elevating and also lowering blood pressure to a possibly dangerous level.

A recent study examined recreational erectile dysfunction medication use among young men. Since its introduction to the consumer market in 1998, Viagra and other oral erectile dysfunction medications (EDMs), with their promise of four-hour long erections, have become an increasingly popular drug of abuse. Viagra and other oral EDMs are unfortunately associated with increased sexual risk behaviors in young men, yet they may also negatively impact sexual function. By affecting confidence, a healthy young man may lose belief in his ability to attain an erection without pharmacological aid.

The researchers worked with a sample population comprised of 1,207 sexually active men recruited from undergraduate institutions within the U.S. Participants completed an online survey assessing frequency of EDM use, as well as levels of sexual function and levels of confidence in ability to gain and maintain erection. Recreational users reported lower erectile confidence and lower overall satisfaction compared with nonusers. Researchers believe their results underscore the possibility that recreational use of EDMs among healthy young men may lead to dysfunction.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pausinystalia_yohimbe
http://www.globinmed.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=83409:pausinystal/
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail295.php

http://www.medicaldaily.com/discover-male-enhancement-through-4-natural-libido-boosters-246699

.http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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Watermelon Yields Viagra-like fects

Watermelons contain an ingredient called citrulline that can trigger production of a compound that helps relax the body’s blood vessels, similar to what happens when a man takes Viagra, said scientists in Texas, one of the nation‘s top producers of the seedless variety.

Found in the flesh and rind of watermelons, citrulline reacts with the body’s enzymes when consumed in large quantities and is changed into arginine, an amino acid that benefits the heart and the circulatory and immune systems.

“Arginine boosts nitric oxide, which relaxes blood vessels, the same basic effect that Viagra has, to treat erectile dysfunction and maybe even prevent it,” said Bhimu Patil, a researcher and director of Texas A&M’s Fruit and Vegetable Improvement Center. “Watermelon may not be as organ-specific as Viagra, but it’s a great way to relax blood vessels without any drug side effects.”

Todd Wehner, who studies watermelon breeding at North Carolina State University, said anyone taking Viagra shouldn’t expect the same result from watermelon.

“It sounds like it would be an effect that would be interesting but not a substitute for any medical treatment,” Wehner said.

The nitric oxide can also help with angina, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular problems, according to the study, which was paid for by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

More citrulline — about 60 percent — is found in watermelon rind than in the flesh, Patil said, but that can vary. But scientists may be able to find ways to boost the concentrations in the flesh, he said.

Citrulline is found in all colors of watermelon and is highest in the yellow-fleshed types, said Penelope Perkins-Veazie, a USDA researcher in Lane, Okla.

She said Patil’s research is valid, but with a caveat: One would need to eat about six cups of watermelon to get enough citrulline to boost the body’s arginine level.

“The problem you have when you eat a lot of watermelon is you tend to run to the bathroom more,” Perkins-Veazie said.

Watermelon is a diuretic and was a homeopathic treatment for kidney patients before dialysis became widespread.

Another issue is the amount of sugar that much watermelon would spill into the bloodstream — a jolt that could cause cramping, Perkins-Veazie said.

Patil said he would like to do future studies on how to reduce the sugar content in watermelon.

The relationship between citrulline and arginine might also prove helpful to those who are obese or suffer from type-2 diabetes. The beneficial effects — among them the ability to relax blood vessels, much like Viagra does — are beginning to be revealed in research.
Citrulline is present in other curcubits, like cucumbers and cantaloupe, at very low levels, and in the milk protein casein. The highest concentrations of citrulline are found in walnut seedlings, Perkins-Veazie said.

“But they’re bitter and most people don’t want to eat them,” she said.

Sources: Los Angeles Times July 3,’08

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