Tag Archives: Yin and yang

Dendrobium hancockii

Botanical Name : Dendrobium hancockii
Family:Orchid
Genus: Dendrobium
Species: hancockii

Common Name : Shih Hu

Habitat :Origin: China

Description:
Plants look like a cluster of miniature 26″ bamboo canes with branching reddish purple stems, grass-like 1″ leaves, 1-1/2″ brilliant golden/yellow flowers with a velvet orange lip appear at random during winter and spring, overall a charming oriental appearance with beautiful flowers, easy grower

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Winter,Spring Blooming Bright to Full Sun; 2750-3750 Footcandles (midday shade required) Warm,Intermediate to Cool;45°F min. to 98°F max.(tolerant of extremes,favoring warm)

Medicinal Uses:
Shih hu is the Chinese dendrobium orchid, a famous chi tonic of the sages.  It is cooling and mildly sweet and salty, restoring bodily fluids and alleviating fatigue.  Large golden stems are dried and simmered with licorice or ginger to restore sexual vigor.  This Chinese kidney yin tonic affects the lower back, knees and sexual vigor. To the Chinese, the kidneys rule the bone, bone marrow, memory, hearing and brain function. The kidneys store ancestral chi and heredity, as well as having both yin and yang properties, restoring fluids and enhancing vitality. The stem is used to treats fever, cough, thirst

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.clanorchids.com/pages/dends/denhancockii.html
http://www.andysorchids.com/pictureframe.asp?pic=images/Species/3462med.jpg&PicId=3462&PicNam=Dendrobium – hancockii
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

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Cistanche salsa

Botanical Name:Cistanche salsa
Family: Orobanchaceae
Genus: Cistanche
Order: Lamiales
Species: Cistanche salsa

Common Name: Broomrape

Habitat : Grows in Samarian desert, Judean desert and Dead Sea valley, Negev hills and Eilat, Aravah, Valley

Description:

Cistanche is a worldwide genus of holoparasitic desert plants in the family Orobanchaceae. They lack chlorophyll and obtain nutrients and water from the host plants whose roots they parasitize…..CLICK  &  SEE  THE  PICTURES

Growing in arid climates, cistanche is a parasitic plant that connects to the conductive system of a host, extracting water and nutrients from the roots of the host plant. Cistanche is native to the Taklimakan desert region of in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region northwest China where it grows on host desert plants tamarix and haloxylon ammodendron.

Cistanche salsa is a parasite on the roots of Kalidium (CLIVK & SEE ) as well as on species of Halostachys, Halocnermum, or Salicornia. The stubby rhizome of Cistanche is attached to the fine roots of the host plants (CLICK & SEE). The stems of cistanche are sliced to produce the pharmacy materials (CLICK & SEE).

You may click to see more pictures:

Medicinal Uses:

Along with other members of the genus, Cistanche deserticola is the primary source of the Chinese herbal medicine cistanche (Chinese:, pinyin ròuc?ngróng). The main sources of cistanche are Cistanche salsa and Cistanche deserticola, although it may also be obtained from Cistanche tubulosa, Cistanche sinensis, and Cistanche ambigua. The drug, known in Chinese as suosuo dayun, is collected in spring before sprouting, by slicing the stems of the plant. Cistanche deserticola has been placed on CITES Appendix 2, a list of endangered species not banned from trade but requiring monitoring. With increased consumption of cistanche, the population of the species has decreased and its area of distribution has shrunk. Aside from over-collection or indiscriminate collection, an important factor in the diminished supply of cistanche is a loss of the saxaul host, Haloxylon ammodendron, which is widely used for firewood.

Cistanche has been used as a medicine for about 1800 years and is recorded in the Shennong Bencao Jing and Bencao Gangmu as a tonic. Most of the medicinal claims have never been evaluated through clinical testing, and those claims that have been examined under controlled medical study are not supported.
This herb has long been renowned in China as a potent sexual tonic for both men and women. Yang Kui-gei (Precious Concubine), the pampered and notoriously seductive consort to the elegant Tang dynasty emperor Ming Huang, is said to have used this herb daily as a sexual tonic.  Most women use it primarily to promote healthy ovulation and enhance fertility, while men enjoy it mainly to strengthen their sexual organs and increase sexual vitality.  It is particularly recommended as a cure and preventive for excess loss of semen due to involuntary ejaculation, a condition that Chinese physicians regard as a grave threat to male health and longevity.  Ancient Chinese almanacs sometimes refer to it as the Magic Medicine of Eternal Youth and Immortality.

The stems of cistanche are sliced to produce the pharmacy materials. Modern use of cistanche in Chinese herbalism is to treat yang deficiency that contributes to fertility problems (including impotence and female infertility) and reproductive system disorders such as profuse menstrual bleeding or leukorrhea. Additionally, it is used for coldness of the lower back and legs that leads to pain (e.g., lumbago) or weakness (e.g., muscle flaccidity). As a secondary property, cistanche is a mild laxative for dry stool.
The fleshy stem is prepared for medicine by cleaning it and then soaking it in wine, after which the central fingers are removed.  It is then salted and dried in the sun.

Cistanche is salty. It mainly treats the five taxations and seven damages, supplements the center, eliminates cold and heat and pain in the penis, nourishes the five viscera, strengthens yin, and boosts essence qi. In females, it makes pregnancy possible and treats concretions and conglomerations. Protracted taking may make the body light.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Cistanche_salsa
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cistanche
http://www.wildflowers.co.il/english/plant.asp?ID=618

http://www.itmonline.org/arts/cistanche.htm

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Ba Ji Tian

Botanical Name :Morinda officinalis
Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Morinda
Species: M. officinalis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms:   Ba Ji Tian? Bajitian? Indianmulberry (root)? Medicinal indian mulberry? Medicinal Indianmulberry Root? Medicinal Indionmulberry Root? morinda (root)? Morinda officinalis? Morinda Root? Morindae Radix? Radix Morindae? Radix Morindae Officinalis Root

Part Used : Root

Habitat :Ba Ji Tian is  native to Australia and Malaysia, although it is now used in China, India and other parts of Asia. It grows  in  sparse or dense forests and thickets on mountains, also cultivated; 100-500 m. Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan.

Description:

Morinda officinalis  is a herbaceous  vine.  Lianas; branches surrounded at base by persistent leafless stipules, when young strigillose, hirtellous, or pilose, becoming glabrescent and scabrous, angled, brown or bluish black. Leaves opposite; petiole 4-11 mm, densely puberulent, strigillose, hirtellous, or hirsute to glabrescent; blade drying papery, on both surfaces brown to yellow-brown, shiny to matte adaxially, matte abaxially, ovate-oblong, obovate-oblong, or elliptic, 6-13 × 3-6 cm, adaxially sparsely strigillose, hirtellous, or hirsute to glabrescent, abaxially glabrous or sparsely hirtellous along principal veins, base obtuse, rounded, cuneate, or acute, apex acute, obtuse, or rounded and abruptly mucronulate; secondary veins (4 or)5-7 pairs, with small pilosulous domatia; stipules fused into a spathe or tube, 3-5 mm, membranous, puberulent to hirtellous, truncate, on each side 2-denticulate. Inflorescence terminal; peduncles 1-7 or 15-25, umbellate or fasciculate, 0.1-1 cm, densely hirtellous to strigillose, as a group usually subtended by 1 or 2 stipuliform bracts; heads 1 per peduncle, subglobose to hemispherical, 5-7 mm in diam., 1-3- or 4-10-flowered. Flowers fused for ca. half of hypanthium, biology not noted. Calyx puberulent to glabrous; limb 1-1.5 mm, lobed for ca. 1/2; lobes 2-4, triangular, sometimes markedly unequal on an individual flower, obtuse to acute. Corolla white, campanulate or urceolate, outside puberulent, hirtellous, or glabrescent; tube 3-4 mm, inside densely villosulous from middle of tube to throat; lobes (2-)4, lanceolate or narrowly oblong, 3-4 mm, apically thickened and rostrate. Drupecetum globose to oblate, 5-11 mm in diam. Drupes fully fused, red, subglobose, 4-5 mm. Fl. May-Jul, fr. Oct-Nov.

You may click to see the picture

Also known as noni, morinda is a wandering plant  It resembles a mulberry bush, with large, triangular leaves and green berries.

Benefits of taking Morinda officinalis(bajitian) extract supplements:

1 , Improve sexual performance:

Morinda only contained in the “Shen Nong grass by”, as a top grade, ancient herbal medicine has the record, is a traditional medicine for kidney yang. Morinda officinalis extract in China and the Far East culture was used to enhance sexual performance have a long history, commonly used to enhance the strength of male and female sexual function, can improve the deficiency weak impotence, premature ejaculation, female palace cold infertility, menstrual reconcile sex and so on.

In one study, 35 -bit by the lack of erection, premature ejaculation problems in men and 30 -bit infertility and frigidity issues of women in an open clinical trial to accept 250-300mg Morinda officinalis extract treatment and continued three months . As a result of the treatment of more than 90 % of patients admitted substantial improvement in their symptoms.

2 , Strengthen the tendons and bones, expel cold and dampness:

when the liver and kidney dysfunction, manifested as weakness, fatigue and lassitude cold pain; accompanied by joint pain or chronic rheumatism, weakness, joint pain, cold, easy fatigue and pale tongue . Morinda effective in the treatment of liver and kidney dysfunction.

3 , Enhance immunity, resistance to disease invasion:

Experimental results show officinalis polysaccharides can increase the juvenile thymus weight, significantly increased macrophage phagocytic percentage, and can significantly improve the mouse P-JFC formation. Description Morinda polysaccharide with adrenocorticotropic hormone and with enhanced physical role. Can enhance human immunity, reduce diseases.

4 , Anti-aging, Anti-fatigue, Anti-depressants:

found: Morinda officinalis extract can significantly increase the aging mouse brain tissue glucose content; make aging rat model of brain tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione over oxidase (GSH? Px) levels increased, increased activity, reduce lipid peroxidation (LPo) content, slow brain aging.

Morinda officinalis extract can significantly prolong the mice continued to swim in the water time and improve exercise capacity in the hanging line, but also reduce the mice under hypoxia oxygen consumption, increasing the duration of hypoxia. Morinda that can enhance the body reserves, increased fatigue resistance, improve the body’s stress in the hypoxic stimulation, compensatory ability.

Study found that extracts from Morinda isolated five monomers ( succinate and Nice sugar 4 months inulin-type oligosaccharides single body ) were fart with antidepressant activity.

5 , Enhance learning and memory:

Morinda extract can significantly improve the D -galactose-induced spatial learning and memory decline in aging rats, especially in space exploration process to highlight that Morinda officinalis extract can enhance learning and memory.

 

Main function: Herb for Yang Deficiency (Yang Tonic)

Thermal qual.: Warm
Taste :Spicy, sweet
Functions:
*Tonifies Kidney Yang
*Dispels Wind/Cold/Wetness
*Used for Kidney Deficiency with muscular and skeletal atrophy
*Regulates Qi Stagnation pain in legs

Cautions:
*Contraindicated in Yin Deficiency Heat,
*Contraindicated in difficult urination and in constipation

Toxicity: Relatively safe for long term use

Phyto-chemicals:   Morindone, rubichloric acid, morindadiol, sitosterol

Western Properties:   Anti-baccterial, hypotensive, adreno-cortical stimulant, anti-depressant, aphrodisiac, androgenic, cerebral restorative, urogenital astringent, analgesic, musculosceletal restorative, anti-rheumatic, interferon inducent

Notes: Used for lack of libido, impotence, infertility, painful knees/legs, arthritis, fatigue, musculosceletal atrophy.
This plant has historically been used as a natural sweetener and medicinal herb in its native Mexico and parts of Central America. It was used by the Aztecs and introduced to the Spanish when they arrived.

The sweet taste is caused by a sesquiterpene compound called hernandulcin, which was discovered in 1985 and named for Francisco Hernández, the Spanish physician who first described the plant in the sixteenth century.

Other  Medicinal  Uses:
In Belize, this is a favorite remedy for bronchitis and dry, hacking coughs. Fresh plant material is boiled, and the patient holds his head over the pot. The warm mixture is then strained and sipped slowly. For toothaches, the flowers are chewed or placed directly on the gum.  The drug is used as a stimulating expectorant, the tincture, in doses of ½  to 1 fluid drachm, is given as a respiratory sedative in coughs. It acts as an alterative on the mucous membrane.  Lippiol, in doses of 4 1/2 grains, causes warmth, flushing, diaphoresis and drowsiness.  Indications: Persistent dry hard resonant or ringing bronchial cough. Useful in chronic bronchitis, having a soothing and sedative effect to the mucous surface of the post-nasal region and bronchial tubes, soothing and relieving irritability, of these surfaces, and is a valuable expectorant in these conditions. Its action is limited to the air passages.

Other Uses: Culinary, Fragrant

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://www.herbalists.on.ca/resources/freeman/MORINDA.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morinda_officinalis
http://tcm.health-info.org/Herbology.Materia.Medica/bajitian-properties.htm
Dr. Shen's Chinese Herbs

http://www.nutragreenbio.com/product/morinda-officinalis-bajitian-extract

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