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Herbs & Plants

Geranium viscosissimum

Botanical Name: Geranium viscosissimum
Family: Geraniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Geraniales
Genus: Geranium
Species: G. viscosissimum

Synonyms: Geranium attenuilobum G.N. & F.F. Jones

Common Names: Sticky Geranium, Sticky purple geranium

Habitat: Geranium viscosissimum is natiive to western N. America – British Columbia to N. California, east to Alberta. It grows on the open woods and meadows. Plentiful in medium-dry to moist or even wet soils of open woods, roadsides, creek banks and meadows to an altitude of 2,700 metres.

Description:
Geranium viscosissimum is a large, clumped 0.5–3 feet (0.15–0.91 m) tall perennial wild geranium. The stem, leaves, and flower stalks are covered with sticky hairs. The right-green leaves are dissected, many-toothed, and deeply-lobed.

Its bloom period is April to September, depending on elevation and latitude. It has 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) saucer-shaped pink flowers with reddish-purple lines on the petals. They occur in an open cluster near the top of strong, branching 1–2 feet (0.30–0.61 m) flower stalks.

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Cultivation:
Succeeds in any good soil in sun or partial shade. Plants are hardy to about -25°c. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits. This species is closely related to G. nervosum.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Edible Uses:
Flowers – added to salads or used as a garnish. Leaves – raw or cooked. Not choice.

Medicinal Uses:
The whole plant is astringent, salve and styptic. An infusion of the leaves, plus a sweat bath with the leaves, is used as a treatment for colds. It is used as a gargle in the treatment of sore throats. An infusion of the leaves or the roots is used as a wash for sore eyes. A poultice of the leaves or roots has been applied to cuts, sores etc

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geranium_viscosissimum
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium+viscosissimum

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Herbs & Plants

Geranium pratense

Botanical name: Geranium pratense
Family: Geraniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Geraniales
Genus: Geranium
Species: G. pratense

Common Names: Meadow Crane’s Bill, Meadow geranium, Geranium

Habitat: Geranium pratense is native to much of Europe and Asia, but is cultivated and naturalized elsewhere

Description:
Geranium pratense is a herbiculas perennial plant, growing to 1.2 m (4ft) at a fast rate. The leaves are deeply divided into 7-9 lobes and 3-6 inch wide . It is in flower from June to September and the flowers are pale blue, although getting paler into the centre. The flowers have 5 petals, which sometimes have veins. The stamens have pink-purple stalks with dark purple anthers. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.

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Cultivation:
Tolerates a wide range of soil types. There are many named varieties, selected for their ornamental value. Plants can be naturalized in meadows. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is used as a vulnerary. The root is used in Tibetan medicine where it is said to have an acrid, sweet flavour plus a cooling potency. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge, it is used in the treatment of fevers from influenza, inflammation of the lungs, pain and swellings of the limbs.

Other Uses: Landscape Uses:Alpine garden, Border. Succeeds in any moderately fertile retentive soil in a sunny position. Attractive foliage, Not North American native, Naturalizing, Suitable for cut flowers.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geranium_pratense
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium+pratense

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Herbs & Plants

Geranium molle

Botanical Name: Geranium molle
Family: Geraniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Geraniales
Genus: Geranium
Species: G. molle

Synonyms:
*Geranium luganense Chenevard
*Geranium abortivum De Not. ex Ces.
*Geranium brutium [b] micranthum N.Terracc.
*Geranium brutium Gasp.
*Geranium calabrum Ten.
*Geranium leiocaulon Ledeb.

Common Names: Dove’s-foot Crane’s-bill or Dovesfoot Geranium

Habitat: Geranium molle is native to Britain, Europe to the Himalayas. It grows on the dry grassland, dunes, waste places and cultivated ground.

Description:
Geranium molle is a small annual plant reaching on average 5–30 centimetres (2.0–11.8 in) in height. It is a very branched plant, quite hairy, with several ascending stems. The leaves are palmate, cut 5 to 9 times. The basal leaves are arranged in a rosette, the upper ones are sessile, rounded and hairy, with a long petiole of about 5–12 millimetres (0.20–0.47 in). The flowers are pinkish-purple, 8–12 mm in diameter, with very jagged petals. It blooms from April to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite and mainly pollinated by Hymenoptera. Fruits are glabrous, usually with 6-9 transverse ridges.

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Cultivation: Succeeds in any moderately fertile retentive soil in a sunny position. Tolerates a wide range of soil types[200]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Medicinal Uses: The plant is considered to be anodyne, astringent and vulnerary.
It is found by experience to be good for wind cholic, as also to expel the stone and gravel in the kidneys. The decoction thereof in wine, is an excellent good cure for those that have inward wounds or bruises, both to stay the bleeding, to dissolve and expel the congealed blood, and to heal the parts, as also to cleanse and heal outward sores, ulcers and fistulas; and for green wounds, many do only bruise the herb, and apply it to the places, and it heals them quickly. The same decoction in wine fomented to any place pained with the gout, or to joint-aches, or pains of the sinews, gives much ease. The powder or decoction of the herb sinews, gives much ease. The powder or decoction of the herb taken for some time together, is found by experience to be good for ruptures and burstings in people, either young or old.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geranium_molle
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium+molle
https://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Dovesfoot%20Geranium.html

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Herbs & Plants

Geranium macrorrhizum

Botanical Name: Geranium macrorrhizum
Family: Geraniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Geraniales
Genus: Geranium
Species: G. macrorrhizum

Common Names: Bigroot geranium, Bulgarian geranium, and Rock crane’s-bill.

Habitat: Geranium macrorrhizum ios native to C. Europe. A garden escape in Britain in S. Devon. It grows in the limestone rocks, screes, in woods and scrub to 2100 metres. Shady places, especially in mountains.

Description:
Geranium macrorrhizum is a perenniial flowering plant , growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.6 m (2ft) at a fast rate. It has five-lobed (palmate) leaves that are aromatic when crushed, with pale pink flowers. It is in flower from June to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.

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Cultivation:
Easily grown in dry or moist situations, in sun or light shade[187, 200]. Succeeds even in deep shade. Tolerates a wide range of soil types, succeeding in any moderately fertile retentive soil. Calcicole. Established plants are drought resistant. A very ornamental plant, there are many named varieties. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Very easy, virtually every bit of a divided plant, whether it has roots or not, will grow away and produce roots[190]. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is used for medical purposes in the traditional herbal medicine since it possesses high antimicrobial properties. Essential oil is prepared from it so it is also used in aromatherapy. In Bulgaria an oil is extracted from this plant, the name of which in Bulgarian means ‘the healthy one’. In addition to essential oil, it contains flavonoids, sesquiterpenes, phenolic acids, pigments, vitamins, and mineral salts. A major component of essential oil is the sesquiterpene ketone germacrone.

Other Uses:
It is cultivated as an ornamental plant in temperate regions, where it is used as a flowering groundcover, with named cultivars selected for flower colors from white through pink to magenta. The cultivars ‘Ingwersen’s Variety’ (pale pink) and ‘White-ness’ have gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.

The very aromatic leaves have been used in the past as a source of geranium oil. They are used in pot-pourri and perfumery. A good dense ground cover plant. A very effective weed smotherer. Plants grow rampantly, rooting as they spread[208]. They should be spaced about 60cm apart each way.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geranium_macrorrhizum
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium+macrorrhizum

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Herbs & Plants

Geranium lucidum

Botanical Name: Geranium lucidum
Family: Geraniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Geraniales
Genus: Geranium
Species: G. lucidum

Synonyms: Geranium laevigatum

Common Names: Shining geranium, Shiny geranium,

Habitat: Geranium lucidum is native to Britain, Europe and N. Africa to the Himalayas. It grows on the shady rocks, walls and hedgebanks, on calcareous soils.

Description:
Geranium lucidum is an annual plant with stems up to 35 cm (14 in) long, brittle, fleshy, hairless and often red. Leaves round or kidney-shaped and glossy, palmately-lobed or divided bluntly to about two-thirds of their depth, sometimes with short hairs on the upper surface. Flowers with parts in fives, with sharply keeled sepals and bright pink, rounded petals, some 10 mm (0.4 in) in diameter, the 8 to 10 mm (0.3 to 0.4 in) petals having long bases and flat blades. These are born in pairs from May to August. The fruits are beaked capsules, ridged and slightly hairy, at least on the edges, and splitting open into five parts. The seeds are smooth. The whole plant has a tendency to turn red.

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Cultivation:
Succeeds in any moderately fertile retentive soil in a sunny position. Most members of this genus tolerate a wide range of soil types, though this species is said to require a calcareous soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits.

Medicinal Uses: The plant is diuretic and astringent.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geranium_lucidum
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Geranium+lucidum