Categories
Herbs & Plants

Umbrella Plant

Botanical Name: Darmera peltata
Family: Saxifragaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Saxifragales
Genus: Darmera
Species: D. peltata

Synonyms:
*Peltiphyllum peltatum
*Saxifraga peltata Torr. ex Benth.

Common Names:Umbrella Plant, Indian rhubarb.

Habitat:Umbrella Plant is native to mountain streamsides in woodland in the western United States (southwestern Oregon to northwestern California) It grows on the banks of mountain streams below 1800 metres. By or in cold mountain stream.

Description:
Umbrella Plant is a slowly spreading rhizomatous perennial plant, growing to 2 m (6 ft 7 in) tall by 1 m (3 ft 3 in) wide.In late spring the flowers emerge before the leaves, with rounded cymes of numerous five-petalled white to bright pink flowers (measuring up to 1.5 cm across each) borne on flower stems up to 2m long. The leaves are peltate, rounded, deeply lobed, coarsely toothed, conspicuously veined and dark green, also on stems up to 2m in height. The leaves turn red in autumn.

In gardens, Darmera peltata flourishes in pond margins and bog gardens, where it forms an imposing umbrella-like clump. It is suited to smaller gardens where there is no room for Gunnera manicata or Gunnera tinctoria, distantly related plants that are somewhat similar in appearance, but much larger.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation& Propagation:
Seed – surface sow as soon as it is ripe or in early spring in a cold frame. Keep the soil very moist. The seed usually germinates in 1 – 3 months at 15°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring[31]. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Edible Uses:
Young, tender leaves edible raw. Peltiphyllum peltatum, Indian rhubarb. Peeled leafstalk edible raw or cooked. … Its leaves are used similar to a bay leaf for flavoring although the flavor is different than a bay leaf.

Medicinal Uses: Not known yet.

Other Use:
Can be grown as a ground cover plant in a sunny position. Plants should be spaced about 60cm apart each way. Useful as a soil stabilizer for marshy land or muddy banks.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darmera
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Darmera+peltata

Advertisements
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Ulex gallii

Botanical Name: Ulex gallii
Family: Fabaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Fabales
Genus: Ulex
Species: U. gallii

Synonyms: Furze. Broom. Whin. Prickly Broom. Ruffet. Frey. Goss.

Common Names: Western gorse or Dwarf furze

Habitat: Ulex gallii is native to the Atlantic coasts of western Europe: southern Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, the Isle of Man, western France and the northern coast of Spain.

Description:
Ulex gallii is usually 10 to 50 centimetres (4 to 20 in) tall although it may grow up to 2 metres (7 ft). The stems are modified into spines, mostly about 1 centimetre (0.4 in) long, but with some regularly spaced recurved spines of about 3 centimetres (1 in). Like other members of the genus Ulex it has trifoliate leaves as a seedling, but later the leaves are reduced to small scales or spines. The stems are green, and almost wholly replace the leaves as the plant’s functioning photosynthetic organs.

The flowers are yellow, 1 to 2 centimetres (0.4 to 0.8 in) long, with the typical pea-flower structure; they are produced principally in the late summer and autumn, rarely before July. The fruit is a legume (pod), partly enclosed by the pale brown remnants of the flower.

Like many species of gorse, it can grow as a fire-climax plant, which readily catches fire but re-grows from the roots after the fire; the seeds are also adapted to germinate after slight scorching by fire.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation:
Ulex gallii is similarly capable of growing in a range of soil moisture conditions and is present growing in moist profiles where soil conditions are often maintained by some impedance to drainage in brown earths or podzolic profiles with an argillic B horizon or impervious iron?pan.This hardy plant will grow in very poor, sandy soils and acidic peat. It must have decent drainage and plenty of sun. It will grow well in exposed coastal sites, but its shape will be flattened by the wind. Mature plants are extremely drought hardy.

Edible Uses:
The bright yellow flowers can be eaten raw and can be made into a tea. The buds can be pickled and used like capers. Gorse is a useful wild food as it flowers continually all year round. Issues: Do not eat flowers in very large quantities on a regular basis as they contain slightly toxic alkaloids.
Only the flowers and flower buds are considered edible and in small quantities. The peas and pods are toxic.

Medicinal Uses:
Flowers Gorse has never played much of a role in herbal medicine, though its flowers have been used in the treatment of jaundice and as a treatment for scarlet fever in children. Seeds Said to be astringent and has been used in the treatment of diarrhoea and stones.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulex_gallii
https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gorgol31.html

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Urn Plant

Botanical Name: Aechmea fasciata
Family: Bromeliaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Poales
Genus: Aechmea
Subgenus: Aechmea subg. Platyaechmea
Species:A. fasciata

Common Names: Urn Plant, Aechmea, Silver Vase PlantUrn, Vase Plant

Habitat:Urn Plant is native to Brazil. This plant is probably the best known species in this genus, and it is often grown as a houseplant in temperate areas.

Description:
Grow in bright but filtered light as a house plant. Indoor perennial herb . The plant grows slowly, reaching 30–90 cm (12–35 in) in height, with a spread of up to 60 cm (24 in). It has elliptic–oval-shaped leaves 45–90 cm (18–35 in) long and arranged in a basal rosette pattern. They like to have moisture in the cup-like space of the whorl of leaves. Do not overwater in the winter and remove dead leaves as necessary to maintain a quality appearance. It does die after flowering but often produces pups that can be transplanted. If you would like to try to force the plant to flower place a cut apple near the plant and cover with a plastic bag for a few weeks. Keep the plant out of direct sunlight. The ethylene released from the apple should induce flowering.

In its native habitat, it will grow in the ground or in trees without taking any nourishment from the tree. This is a stemless plant that typically grows 1-3′ tall in a basal rosette of stiff, arching, broad, strap-shaped, elliptic-oval, silvery-green leaves which resemble an urn. Leaf margins have black spines. An urn plant shoot blooms only once and then dies. But the bloom is spectacular.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Uses:
It is air-feeder, collecting nourishment from water and decaying mater in the upturned cup of their leaves. Aechmea fasciata do not really use their roots other than for anchoring. Aechmea fasciata have adapted to their environment and are always arranged in a rosette, shaped to capture and hold the water.

Garden Uses:
Good flowering houseplant.

Known Hazards: Aechmea fasciata is listed in the FDA Poisonous Plant Database under the section for “Skin irritating substances in plants” and is known to cause contact dermititis, phytophoto dermatitis, and contact allergy.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aechmea_fasciata
https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/aechmea/
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=b647

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Ursinia calenduliflora

Botanical Name: Ursinia calenduliflora
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Ursinia
Type species: Ursinia paradoxa

Synonyms:
*Sphenogyne R.Br.
*Ursiniopsis E.Phillips
*Chronobasis DC. ex Benth. & Hook.f.

Common Names: Namaqua parachute daisy, Springbok rock-ursinia; Bergmagriet, Berggousblom (Afrikaans).

Habitat:Ursinia calenduliflora is native to Richtersveld Mountains to Springbok and the Kamiesberg Mountains.It grows in sandy soil on rocky slopes in Namaqualand, the semi-desert region in the Northern Cape that is well known for its spectacular displays of spring flowers.

Description:
Ursinia calenduliflora is an annual herb, up to 350 mm high, with finely dissected, fresh green, hairless leaves. The flower is a large, bright orange-yellow daisy, up to 50 mm in diameter, and a single flower is produced at the tip of a long, thin flower stalk. The ray florets are sterile and orange or occasionally yellow, with a purple spot at the base. The disc florets are hermaphrodite (contain male and female reproductive structures) and are yellow. There are two different flower forms, one with a dark ring of purple spots around the yellow centre and one with no dark ring.

Flowers are produced from mid- winter to spring, (July to September), depending on the weather; in a year with good and early rains, they will start flowering in July, and if the rain persists, they could continue flowering into late spring, however, in years with little rain, the flowers will be fewer and will be produced over a shorter period. The involucral bracts are free and occur in many, densely overlapping rows, and have conspicuous membranous tips.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Uses:
Ursinia calenduliflora is not used in traditional medicine, nor is it widely grown in gardens. It is easy and rewarding to grow and a colourful bedding plant for spring display.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ursinia
http://pza.sanbi.org/ursinia-calenduliflora

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Epiphyllum xypetalum

Botanical Name: Epiphyllum xypetalum
Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Epiphyllum
Species: E. oxypetalum

Synonyms:
*Cactus oxypetalus Moc. & Sessé ex DC.
*Cereus latifrons Zucc.
*Cereus oxypetalus DC.
*Epiphyllum acuminatum K.Schum.
*Epiphyllum grande (Lem.) Britton & Rose

Common Names: Dutchman’s pipe cactus or Queen/princess of the nigh
Orchid cactus, Jungle cactus, Night blooming cereus, Dutchman’s Pipe • Hindi: Nishagandhi • Marathi: Brahma kamal • Urdu: Gul-e bakawali • Mizo: Bethlehempar

Vernacular Names:
In India, it is called Iruludavare in Kannada, meaning ‘night lotus’. Brahma Kamalam in Sanskrit, named after the Hindu god of creation, Lord Brahma. It is believed that the wishes of people who pray to God while the flower is blooming will be fulfilled. Also it is called Gulebakavali in Ancient Tamil. It is called Kadupul flower in Sri Lanka (Sri Lanka’s native blossom)

The Chinese chengyu (four character idiom) use this flower to describe someone who has an impressive but very brief moment of glory, like a “flash in a pan,” since an Epiphyllum oxypetalum plant might bloom only once a year over a few days. Therefore, someone described as is generally understood to be a person who shows off or unexpectedly gains some achievement and is thought to be an exception or only lucky. The flower also has a rich history in Japan, where it is known as the (Gekka Bijin) or “Beauty under the Moon”. In Sri Lanka it is called “Kadupul” which means the flower from heaven. In Indonesia it is called “Wijaya Kusuma” which means “Flower of Triumph”.

Habitat: Epiphyllum oxypetalum is native to Southern Mexico and to extensive areas of South America. It is widely cultivated, escapes from cultivation in tropical areas especially in the southeast Asia, and has become naturalised in China.

Description:
Epiphyllum xypetalum is a shrub growing on trees, freely branched, 2-6 m tall, with aerial roots. Old stems and basal extension shoots round, to 2 m or more, woody; branches numerous, dark green, laterally flattened, leaflike, lanceshaped to oblong-lanceshaped, 15-100 × 5-12 cm, hairless, base wedge-shaped, narrowed, or stalked, margin wavy to deeply rounded toothed, tip pointed to tapering; midrib 2-6 mm wide, stout. Areoles small, spineless.

The flower blooms at night, since the flowers are predominantly pollinated by bats and large moths. They have large white star-like flowers to help their pollinators locate the blossoms by moon or star light, and many have very lovely fragrances. Pure white flowers, the size of a dinner plate, open as soon as the sun goes down and stay open all night, closing in the morning.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Flowers nocturnal, fragrant, funnel-shaped, 25-30 × 10-27 cm. Receptacle tube 13-18 cm, base green, 4-9 mm in diameter, slightly angled, with triangular to lanceshaped scales 3-10 mm. Sepaloids often recurved, pale green or pinkish red, linear to inverted-lanceshaped. Petaloids white, inverted-lanceshaped to obovate, 7-10 × 3-4.5 cm. Filaments white, 2.5-5 mm; anthers cream, 3-3.5 mm. Style white, 20-22 cm; stigmas 15-20, cream, narrowly linear, 1.6-1.8 mm. Fruit rare, purplish red, oblong, about 16 × 5.7 cm. Seed 2-2.5 × about 1.5 mm. Fl. Jun-Oct.

Cultivation:
Epiphyllum oxypetalum is an easily cultivated, fast growing Epiphyllum. It flowers in late spring through late summer; large specimens can produce several crops of flowers in one season. This is the most commonly grown of the Epiphyllum species.

it usually takes at least three years before you will begin to get flowers. A cutting takes time to grow new branches. Buds will appear in the notches (areoles) along the branches. A plant that is already rooted and growing will usually bloom in less than three years.

Edible Uses:
The fruit of Epiphyllum oxypetalum is edible, very similar to the pitaya fruit from the closely related genus Hylocereus, though not so large, being only 3–4 cm long.

Medicinal Uses:
The indigenous peoples of America have used the night blooming cereus as a topical remedy for rheumatism and itchy rashes, as well as an internal herbal remedy for worms, cystitis and fever.

The Native American tribe Death Valley Shoshone called this plant “pain in the heart”, and used it to treat angina-like pains. Several other tribes of Native Americans use the stem to treat diabetes.

Epiphyllum oxypetalum is used in homeopathy and recommended for urinary tract infections, for heart conditions such as the crushing pain of angina and for spasmodic pain and haemorrhage.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphyllum_oxypetalum
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Orchid%20Cactus.html