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Herbs & Plants

Daucus pusillus

Botanical Name: Daucus pusillus
Family: Apiaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales
Genus: Daucus
Species: D. pusillus

Synonyms:
*Babiron pusillum Raf.
*Daucus brevifolius Raf.
*Daucus hispidifolius Clos
*Daucus montevidensis Link ex Spreng.
*Daucus scaber Larrañaga
*Daucus scaber Nutt.
*Daucus scadiophylus Raf.

Common Names: American wild carrot and Rattle-snake-weed. Latin name means “little carrot”, or “tiny carrot”

Habitat: Daucus pusillus is native to Western N. America. It grows on the barrens, plains and dry hills. Streambanks, roadsides and waste areas in Texas.

Description:
Daucus pusillus is an annual/ binnial herb, growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in). The herb grows erect, slender stem, usually single stem, short stiff hairs, bristly.Leaves are green; petiole long up to 6 inches, margins pinnatisect, 3 or 4 times. Flower are white; flowers on tip of slender stem surrounded by supporting structure of bracts, an involucre, fruit is oblong. Flowering Season is March to May, blooms later in California; April to June.
The seeds ripen from August to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Flies, beetles. The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

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Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Propagation:
Through Seeds – sow August/September or April in situ. The seed germinates better if it is cold stratified, therefore the autumn sowing is liable to be more successful.

Edible Uses: Roots are edible -eaten raw or cooked.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is antipruritic, blood purifier and febrifuge. A decoction has been used to treat colds, itches, fevers and snakebites. A poultice of the chewed plant has been applied to snakebites.

Known Hazards: Skin contact with the sap is said to cause photo-sensitivity and/or dermatitis in some people.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daucus_pusillus
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Daucus+pusillus

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Datura quercifolia

Botanical Name: Datura quercifolia
Family: Solanaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Solanales
Genus: Datura
Species: D. quercifolia

Synonyms:

Common Names: Oak-leaved thorn-apple, Oak Leaf Datura, Chinese thorn-apple

Habitat:Datura quercifolia is native to Mexico and the Southwestern United States -( Arizona to Mexico). It grows equally well in dry and moist soils and requires full sun. It contains a mix of alkaloids that are poisonous and can be potentially lethal when ingested.

Description:
Datura quercifolia is an annual herb, growing to 1.5 m (5ft)
It can assume both a prostrate and an upright bushy habit, with bushier forms reaching up to 3 ft. in height. It produces green seed capsules armed with long sharp spines, which, like those of some Datura species, open by four equal valves. The funnel-shaped flowers are white and pale violet tipped with five short triangular teeth and are less than 2 in. long.

The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs).
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil.

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Cultivation:
Prefers a rich light sandy soil and an open sunny position. Grows best in a fertile calcareous soil. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c. This species is extremely susceptible to the various viruses that afflict the potato family (Solanaceae), it can act as a centre of infection so should not be grown near potatoes or tomatoes. Closely related to D. stramonium.

Propagation:
Through seeds -Sow the seed in individual pots in early spring in a greenhouse. Put 3 or 4 seeds in each pot and thin if necessary to the best plant. The seed usually germinates in 3 – 6 weeks at 15°c. Plant out in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Especially in areas with hot summers, it is worthwhile trying a sowing outdoors in situ in mid to late spring.

Ediable Uses:
Fruits are edible – ground up and mixed with clay ( the clay probably has a neutralizing effect on the toxins). A very toxic plant, its use cannot be recommended. The fruit is about 7cm long and 6cm wide. A stupefying beverage is made from the leaves and roots.

Medicinal Uses:
The whole plant is narcotic. It has been used in the past to deaden pain, treat insomnia etc, but any use of this plant should only be carried out under the supervision of a qualified practitioner since the difference between the medicinal dose and a toxic dose is very small.

Other Uses:
Unlike Datura inoxia Datura quercifolia does not have much ornamental value. Datura species are extremely susceptible to the various viruses that afflict the potato family (Solanaceae), it can act as a centre of infection so should not be grown near potatoes or tomatoes.

Known Hazards: All parts of Datura plants contain dangerous levels of poison and may be fatal if ingested by humans or other animals, including livestock and pets. In some places it is prohibited to buy, sell or cultivate Datura plants.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datura_quercifolia
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Datura+quercifolia

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Datisca cannabina

Botanical Name: Datisca cannabina
Family: Datiscaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Cucurbitales
Genus: Datisca
Species: D. cannabina

Synonyms:
*Cannabina laevis Moench
*Datisca glabra Stokes
*Datisca nepalensis D.Don

Common Names: False hemp, Acalbir, Akalbir

Habitat: Datisca cannabina is native to the Aegean Islands, Crete, Cyprus, Anatolia, the Levant, the Transcaucasus, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the western Himalayas and Nepal. It grows on the banks of streams in rich alluvial soils.

Description:
Datisca cannabina is an erect, herbaceous perennial plant producing a clump of unbranched, arching stems from a somewhat woody base; it can grow around 1.8 m (6ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower in September, and the seeds ripen in October. The species is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required). The plant is not self-fertile.The plant is harvested from the wild for local use as a medicine and as a dyestuff.

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Cultivation:
Requires a good deep soil and a sunny position. Plants can be grown in quite coarse grass, which can be cut annually in the autumn. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c. Give the roots protection from winter frosts by mulching them. At one time this plant was commonly cultivated as a dye plant, but with the advent of chemical dyes it has fallen into disuse. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Propagation:
Through Seeds – sow spring in a greenhouse, only just covering the seed. Germination usually takes place within 1 – 3 weeks at 18°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in the spring. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Edible Uses: Not Known.

Medicinal Uses:
The leaves and flowering stems are bitter, diuretic, febrifuge and purgative. The root is used as a sedative in the treatment of rheumatism. It is also applied to carious teeth.

Other Uses: A yellow dye is obtained from the leaves, root and stems.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datisca_cannabina
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Datisca+cannabina

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Dalea candida oligophylla

Botanical Name: Dalea candida oligophylla
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Fabales
Genus: Dalea
Species:D. candida

Synonyms: Petalostemon oligophyllum

Common Name: White Prairie Clover

Habitat: Dalea candida oligophylla is native to Central N. America – southwards from Canada.It grows on dry desert and alluvial soils to 2000 metres. Prairies and open wods on sandy, clayey and rocky soils.

Description:
Dalea candida oligophylla is a perennial herb growing erect to a maximum height around 1 meter (3 ft 3 in), its taproot growing up to 5 or 6 feet (1.5 or 1.8 m) deep. The alternately arranged leaves are each composed of several narrow, gland-dotted, light green leaflets. The inflorescence is a dense cylindrical spike of flowers at the tip of each stem or stem branch. The spike is packed with the pointed green calyces of sepals, the lower ones bearing corollas of white petals and the higher ones blooming later. The fruit is a green oval legume pod containing one seed.

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Cultivation:
Requires a well-drained soil in full sun. A deep-rooted plant, it prefers a sandy loam with added leaf mould. This species is well-suited to informal and naturalistic plantings, especially as part of a collection of native species. We are not sure how hardy this plant is in Britain, but judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. Plants are monocarpic, living for a number of years without flowering and then dying after flowering. The stems, leaves and flowers are dotted with glands, making the plant look blistered. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby.

Propagation:
Through seed – pre-soak for 12 hours in warm water and sow in early spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer

Edible Uses:
Roots are edible -eaten raw or chewed for its pleasant sweet flavour. The root can be dried, ground into a powder and stored for later use. Leaves – cooked. The peeled stems have been used as a food. A tea-like beverage is made from the dried leaves.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is a strong emetic. A poultice of the plant has been used to treat wounds.Among the Ramah Navajo, the candida variety is used for stomachache and as a “life medicine”, especially for fever. A compound decoction is used to treat “snake infection” in sheep.

Other Uses:
An infusion of the roots has been used as a hair wash to prevent the hair from falling out. The plant has been used for making light brooms.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalea_candida_var._oligophylla
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalea_candida
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Dalea+candida+oligophylla

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Consolida regalis

Botanical Name: Consolida regalis
Family: Ranunculaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales
Genus: Consolida
Species: C. regalis

Synonyms:
*Delphinium consolida L.
*Consolida arvensis Opiz
*Consolida regalis subsp.
*Consolida segetum Schur
*Delphidium consolida (L.) Raf.
*Delphinium consolida L.
*Delphinium consolida subsp.
*Delphinium diffusum Stokes
*Delphinium divaricatum Dulac
*Delphinium segetum Lam.
*Delphinium versicolor Salisb

Common Names: Forking larkspur, Rocket-larkspur, Field larkspur, Larkspur and Royal knight’s-spur

Habitat: Consolida regalis is native to S. Europe. A rare casual in Britain.It grows in the cornfields and waste places, usually on sandy or chalky soils, avoiding shade in Britain.

Description:
Consolida regalis is an annual/biennial herb,L growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). The stem is erect, hairy and very branched at the top. The roots grow into the soil up to a depth of 50 centimetres (20 in), so the plant can survive long periods of drought. The leaves are alternately arranged. The inflorescence is a cluster with five to eight hermaphrodite flowers. The flowers are dark blue or purple with five sepals. The upper sepal is prolonged in a spur of 15–18 millimetres (0.59–0.71 in) long, pointing toward the back. There are eight to ten stamens. The flowering period extends from May through August.

It is in flower from June to July, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). The plant is self-fertile.
It is noted for attracting wildlife.

The flowers are pollinated by hymenoptera and lepidoptera. The seeds ripen from June through September. All plant parts are poisonous in large doses, especially the seeds, that contain up to 1.4% of alkaloids.

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Cultivation:
An easily grown plant, it prefers a sunny position in a well-drained soil. Plants succeeded when growing in a dry shady position in the hot dry summer of 1989. A very ornamental plant. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes. Other reports say that it is a good companion for wheat. A good bee plant. Plants resent root disturbance and should not be transplanted.

Propagation:
Through Seeds- best sown as soon as it is ripe in situ. It can also be autumn sown in areas with mild winters, otherwise sow in succession from spring to early summer. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks.

Edible Uses: Not known.

Medicinal Uses:
Larkspur was at one time used internally in the treatment of a range of diseases, but its only certain action is a violent purgative and nowadays it is only occasionally used in folk medicine. It is of value, however, when used externally, to kill skin parasites. The plant should be used with caution, see the notes above on toxicity. The seed is anthelmintic, mildly diuretic, hypnotic, purgative and vasodilator. It has been used internally in the treatment of spasmodic asthma and dropsy. The flowers or the whole plant are mildly diuretic and hypotensive. The expressed juice of the leaves has been considered an effective application to bleeding piles. A conserve made from the flowers has been seen as a good remedy for children when subject to violent purging. The juice of the flowers has also been used as a treatment for colic.

Other Uses:
A strong tincture of the fresh seed is used externally to kill lice and nits in the head and pubic hair. It is also effective against aphids and thrips. A good blue ink is obtained from the expressed juice of the petals together with a little alum. It is made from the leaves according to another report. It is also used as a dye and is green when mixed with alum.

Known Hazards: All parts of the plant are poisonous in large doses. The seed is especially toxic

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consolida_regalis
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Consolida+regalis

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