Categories
Herbs & Plants

Anthericum ramosum

Botanical Name: Anthericum ramosum
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales
Genus: Anthericum
Species: A. ramosum

Synonyms: Phalangites ramosus (L.) Bubani

Common Names: Anthericum ramosum or Branched St Bernard’s-lily

Habitat: Anthericum ramosum is present in most of Europe, being more common in southern countries, and is widespread in Central Asia and Russia. These plants grow in sunny areas and calcareous soils, on semiarid grasslands, slopes and forest edges. In the Alps they can be found at an altitude of 0–1,600 metres (0–5,249 ft) above sea level.

Description:
Anthericum ramosum reaches on average a height of 30–70 centimetres (12–28 in). The grass-like leaves are 50 centimetres (20 in) long and 2–6 millimetres (0.08–0.2 in) wide and are generally much shorter than the inflorescence. It has an erect, paniculate inflorescence. The flower spikes are branched (hence the Latin name ramosus), unlike Anthericum liliago. The six tepals are white, 10–13 millimetres (0.4–0.5 in) long, as are the six stamens. The flower is scentless and pure white, the anthers are bright yellow. The flowering period extends from June through August. The capsular fruit is spherical to three-faced. The flowers are pollinated by hymenopterans, while seed are distributed by the wind.

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Cultivation: Ideally grow in soil that is moist but well-drained in summer and well-drained over winter. Full sun is essential

Propagation: Propagate by seed sown in pots in a cold frame in spring or autumn or propagate by division in spring

Garden Uses:
St. Bernard’s lily is a versatile plant with many uses in a home garden. Its flowers open in sequence on tall, graceful stalks, making it a good choice for the middle of a mixed flower border, where it provides interest for a month or more. The plant also tends to naturalize and spread slowly, and does well in a naturalized setting on a hillside or in a meadow. Tolerant of poor, rocky soil, it’s also useful in a gravel bed or border. St. Bernard’s lily also produces attractive brown fruit capsules after its flowers fade, adding visual interest that can last until early winter.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthericum_ramosum
https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/1339/Anthericum-ramosum/Details

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Categories
Herbs & Plants

American ash

Botanical Name:Fraxinus americana
Family: Oleaceae
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Genus: Fraxinus
Section: Fraxinus sect. Melioides
Species: F. americana

Common Names: American ash or White ash

Habitat:
American ash is native to eastern and central North America. It is found in mesophytic hardwood forests from Nova Scotia west to Minnesota, south to northern Florida, and southwest to eastern Texas. Isolated populations have also been found in western Texas, Wyoming, and Colorado, and the species is reportedly naturalized in Hawaii. It grows on rich upland to lowland woods. Usually found in association with other hardwood trees in well-drained soils on slopes.

Description:

American ash is a deciduous Tree growing to 25 m (82ft) by 15 m (49ft) at a fast rate.
It is in flower from April to May, and the seeds ripen in September. The species is dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required). and is pollinated by Wind. The plant is not self-fertile.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.

It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

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Cultivation:
Landscape Uses:Firewood, Aggressive surface roots possible, Pollard, Street tree. Prefers a deep loamy soil, even if it is on the heavy side. Most members of this genus are gross feeders and require a rich soil. Succeeds in exposed positions and in alkaline soils. Tolerates atmospheric pollution. Young plants tolerate forest shade. One of the most valuable hardwood timber trees in N. America, saplings grow slowly at first, but the growth rate speeds up over the next 50 years. This species is planted on a small scale, mainly in E. Europe, as a timber tree. It has the potential as a forestry tree in Britain, succeeding under conditions that are too dry or frosty for the native ash, F. excelsior. A very ornamental tree, it is often confused in cultivation with F. pennsylvanica. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Male trees usually flower heavily each year, but female trees only flower heavily every 2 – 3 years. Special Features: North American native, Attracts butterflies, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.

Propagation:
The seed is best harvested green – as soon as it is fully developed but before it has fully dried on the tree – and can then be sown immediately in a cold frame. It usually germinates in the spring. Stored seed requires a period of cold stratification and is best sown as soon as possible in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions or a nursery bed in late spring or early summer of the following year. If you have sufficient seed then it is possible to sow it directly into an outdoor seedbed, preferably in the autumn. Grow the seedlings on in the seedbed for 2 years before transplanting either to their permanent positions or to nursery beds.

Medicinal Uses:
The bark is astringent, emmenagogue and a bitter tonic. An infusion is used to promote menstruation. It has also been used as a wash to treat skin sores, itches and vermin on the scalp. The inner bark is diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic and strongly laxative. It is used as a tea to remove bile from the intestines, as a tonic after childbirth and to relieve stomach cramps and fevers. It is chewed and applied as a poultice to sores. The leaves are used to soothe the itching caused by mosquito bites and bee stings. The seeds are thought to be aphrodisiac.

Other Uses:
The leaves are said to repel rattlesnakes and have been worn on the feet of people travelling in rattlesnake country. There are some doubts over the efficacy of this. A yellow dye is obtained from the bark. Wood – strong, hard, heavy, tough, elastic, close grained, moderately durable. It weighs 41lb per cubic foot, seasons well, takes a good polish and is shock resistant. One of the most valuable of the North American timbers, it is much used for tool handles, hockey sticks, baseball bats, the interior of buildings, musical instruments, furniture, woodenware etc. As a fuel it is comparable in quality to such excellent species as oak (Quercus spp) and hickory (Carya spp).

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraxinus_americana
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Fraxinus+americana

Categories
Herbs & Plants (Spices)

Amaranth

Botanical Name: Amaranthus
Family: Amaranthaceae
Subfamily:Amaranthoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Amaranthus

Synonyms:
*Amaranthus abyssinicus L.H.Bailey
*Amaranthus alopecurus Hochst. ex A.Br. & C.D.Bouché
*Amaranthus cararu Moq.
*Amaranthus caudatus subsp. mantegazzianus (Pass.) Hanelt
*Amaranthus caudatus subsp. saueri V.Jehlík

Common Name: Amaranth.
Amaranth possess various vernacular names such as Hindi: Lal sag, Thotakura Chaulai; Marathi: Shavrani math, Rajgira; Tamil: Punkirai; Telegu: Chilaka thotakoora etc. It is also known as Amaranthus hypochondriacus, Amaranthus frumentaceus, Amaranto, Chua, Amaranthus leucocarpus, Red Cockscomb, Velvet Flower.

Habitat: Amarnath is native to Central America and South America, it is also cultivated in the countries having warm climate.

Description:
Amaranth is an annual, large and bushy plant usually about 90-130 cm high. It has oblong-lanceolate pointed green leaves normally arranged alternately in 2-4 inches long. The stems are erect branched. The plant yields flowers at summer or autumn (August and October) which is pink or white in color. The seeds are yellow, white, red, brown, pink, or black in a spherical or flattened lenticular shape. It prefers the warm climate and thrives in well-drained soils. As the plant is annual, it has got the lifespan of one year.

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Food Uses:
The younger greens and small varieties are consumed as salad and older greens are used as a substitute for spinach. Amaranth is added as an ingredient in pasta, bread, instant drinks, baby’s food, etc. It could be added to soups or stews and also taken as a cereal for breakfast. Popped Amaranth is added to bread, tofu or meat. Amaranth flour could be mixed with wheat flour to make bread or other foods. The seed could be cooked or roasted like germ vegetables.

Nutritional Value:
In 98 grams of Amaranth, 9.35 grams of protein is found along with 45.98 grams of Carbohydrate and 5.2 grams of fiber. This grain is rich in various minerals and vitamins such as thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, panthothenic acid, calcium, folate, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, manganese, zinc and potassium. It also possess huge amount of lysine, which is not oftenly found in other grains.

Health Benefits:
Amaranth is rich in antioxidants, , proteins, vitamins and minerals which make it the healthy food by preventing the chronic diseases, enhancing immune system, stimulating repair and growth, lowering inflammation and blood pressure, lessening varicose veins, and promoting the strength of bones and others. It could be consumed either as a leaf vegetable, grain flour or a cereal grain.

Medicinal Uses:
This herb is used by the practitioners to obstruct bleeding. Amaranth is used as an astringent and as treatment for diarrhea, mouth ulcers and excessive menstrual flow. Gargling with this herb assist to alleviate the pharynx tenderness and assist the mouth ulcer treatment. This herb if used externally helps to cure vaginal discharges, nose bleeding and other abrasions. Amaranth greens are used to enhance eyesight.

Known Hazards:
Raw Amaranth possesses some toxic or undesirable components so; Amaranth should be consumed by cooking. Children are intolerant to lysinuric protein which may cause stomach pain and diarrhea. Lysine increases the absorption of calcium in the body which leads to the damage causing amount of calcium in the body. So one should avoid huge intake of calcium and lysine at the same time. Pregnant or breast feeding women should avoid Amaranth in order to be in the safe side.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/amaranth/

Categories
Fish

Coley fish

Binomial name: Pollachius virens
Family: Gadidae
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Gadiformes
Genus: Pollachius
Species: P. virens

Common Name : Coley

Other names: Boston blue (separate from bluefish), Coalfish/coley, and Saithe in the UK, the young fish are called podleys in Scotland and northern England.

Habitat: Coley fish is found in Loch Etive, North Sea. It is common in the northern parts of the Northern Atlantic, including the Bay of Biscay and Palmas Altas Campus. Adults can typically live up to 16–20 years and grow to 100–120 cm but individuals up to 130 cm (51 in) and weigh up to 32 kg (71 lb) have been caught. Juveniles tend to be found close to shore, particularly in rocky areas, and tend to move out into deeper waters as they grow. The current IGFA All-Tackle World Record is 22.7 kg (50 lb) which was caught at Saltstraumen in Norway

Description:
This species can be separated from P. pollachius by looking at the relative lengths of the upper and lower jaws. P. pollachius has a longer underslung lower jaw while P. virens has approximately equal upper and lower jaw lengths. This gives a very different profile to the head. In general, P. pollachius is a brown or golden colour with a dark back while P. virens is bright silver with a very dark green back. P. virens generally appears to have relatively smaller eyes. The lateral line of P. pollachius has a noticeable kink over the pectoral fins while that of P. virens is straighter.

The flesh of coalfish (P. virens) is darkly coloured (hence the common name) while that of P. pollachius is similar to other members of the cod family. This dark colour in the fresh uncooked flesh may have led to the undeserved reputation of this fish as poor for eating.

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A Coley belongs to the same family as cod and haddock, although it’s considered inferior. Generally speaking, coley is a good choice, as stocks are currently healthy and most are harvested sustainably.

Coley is one of the least expensive fish in the cod family and is a great sustainable substitute for cod or haddock in many recipes. Coley has a distinctive coal-coloured skin with a thick white line running laterally along its body; the belly fades to pale silv

Food Uses:
Coalfish is edible and has commercial value, although it is considerably less valuable than premium whitefish such as cod and haddock. To achieve a salmon-like orange color, it can be salted and smoked. In Germany, the fish is commonly sold as Seelachs (literally ‘sea salmon’), although it is not closely related to any salmon.

While a great deal of saithe consumed in Europe are caught in British waters, it is not a popular fish with consumers there. Most of the British saithe catch is thus exported to France, where it is widely eaten.

It is delicious, healthy, and much cheaper alternative to cod. Coley stocks are thought to be in good shape around the UK and fish are caught using low by-catch nets. Coley is one of the top choices for sustainable British fish. Hake: Hake has a similar light flesh to cod, but is much more flavourful.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollachius_virens

Categories
Fish

Capelin Fish

Binomial name: Mallotus villosus
Family: Osmeridae
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Osmeriformes
Genus: Mallotus
Species: M. villosus

Common Names: Capelin or Caplin

Habitat:
Capelin have a circumpolar distribution throughout the arctic and subarctic regions of the world. In the northwestern Atlantic, they range from western Greenland and Hudson Bay in the north to Maine in the south and are most abundant around Newfoundland. Since the early 1990s, they have been observed in greater numbers in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and on the Scotian Shelf. In the eastern Atlantic, they are found from the Barents Sea to the coast of Norway, as well as in Icelandic coastal waters. In the Pacific, their range stretches from the Juan de Fuca Strait north along Alaska and across the Bering Sea to Siberia. From there, their range extends south, around Japan and toward Korea. Some stocks of capelin spend the bulk of their lives offshore, moving inshore only to spawn on beaches, while other stocks live their entire lives offshore, spawning on the bottom in deep water such as in the Barents Sea, in Icelandic waters, and on the Southeast Shoal of the Grand Bank.

Description:
Capelin are small, slender fish that closely resemble smelt. They have a pointed snout with a slightly protruding lower jaw, a large dorsal fin and a small adipose fin behind it. They are silvery under their lateral line and green or olive-green above it, and their underside is silvery-white. During the spawning season, capelin exhibit sexual dimorphism, which means the head and back of males become darker; their pectoral, pelvic and anal fins are well-developed compared to females; and males have ‘spawning ridges’ consisting of a row of elongated scales just above the lateral line on either side of the body. Mature capelin are generally between 13 and 20 centimetres long, with the largest male found in Newfoundland waters at 25 centimetres long. Mature capelin can weigh as much as 40 and 45 grams, and rarely live longer than five years.

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Food Uses:
Caplin fish is eaten in varius ways.Fried or rosted caplin is very tasty.

Possible health benefits of eating caplin;

  1. A rich source of high-quality protein
  2. A good source of selenium, a mineral that acts as a powerful antioxidant in your body

3.Omega-3 fats are polyunsaturated fats with many powerful health benefits.

4.Because capelin is a small forage fish, it tends to be much lower in mercury than larger fish like mackerel and swordfish.

Other Uses:
Commercially, capelin is used for fish meal and oil industry products, but is also appreciated as food. The flesh is agreeable in flavor, resembling herring. Capelin roe (masago) is considered a high-value product.

Known Hazards: Since it is a seafood , those who are allergic to fish and shellfish should avoid it.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capelin
https://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/species-especes/profiles-profils/capelin-capelan-eng.html
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/masago#downsides