Few Health Quaries & Answers

Excessive Sweating:

Q:I suffer from hyperhidrosis; my underarms as well as palms and soles sweat excessively.

Ans: :Hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating affects 3 per cent of the population. It usually starts in the teenage years and can affect the underarms, whole body, palms or soles. Investigations are needed to rule out diseases and endocrine problems. Treatment of the specific disorder cures the condition. If no reason is found, then bathing twice a day and applying anti-perspirants may help. Other alternative treatments are anticholinergic medication, iontophoresis (an electrical procedure), injections of botox, lasers or surgery.

Stroke recovery:-

Q:My mother had a stroke, following which she has weakness of the left side of her body. Will she recover?

Ans: :Recovery from a stroke can start quickly during the first few months and then continue for two to three years. It is best to have proper physiotherapy in the initial days as qualified therapists can electrically stimulate muscles and nerves. This helps prevent stiffness and contractures. In addition, exercises for strength, mobility training, range of motion and balance are important. Any factors responsible for the stroke should also be aggressively treated.

It is important to maintain a positive attitude and encourage your mother.

Patella move:-

Q: I was dancing when I developed a sudden pain in the right knee. I could not walk. The doctor took an X-ray and said my patella is dislocated. Is it serious?

Ans: The patella is a small bone in front of the knee, which lies in a groove on the thigh bone (femur). Dislocation can be complete or partial. It occurs when the patella shifts from this position.

As soon as the injury occurs, rest the knee, and apply ice every 10-15 minutes till the pain reduces. After that you may need a knee brace to hold the patella in position. The quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh are probably weak. Physical therapy is needed to strengthen these and hold the patella in position, otherwise the chance of recurrence is high.

Phone pain:-

Q: I have neck pain a lot of the time but never on Sundays, my weekly off. I spend a lot of time on the cellphone at work.

Ans: :Sometimes, when you need to multitask, you may bend your neck and balance the cellphone at a very awkward angle. Also, people often look downwards at the cell phone. Take a two-minute break every half hour to stretch the neck and shoulder. Jog for 30 minutes in the fresh air every morning. Apply a capsaicin containing ointment to the neck when it hurts and then apply ice. Take a mild painkiller such as metacin to relieve the pain.

Craving sweets:-

Q:I crave chocolate, ladoos and sometimes chips. Once I start eating them, I cannot stop till I feel sick.

Ans:Don’t buy those snacks. If they are not there in your fridge, you are unlikely to actually go out and purchase them. Drink a glass of water when you feel the craving. Check if the cravings occur when you are anxious or depressed. That is the body’s way of building up mood elevating chemicals. Talk to a friend or relative instead.

Resources: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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Frankincense

Other Names: Olibanum, Hebrew: levona], Arabic: al-lub?n.

Description:
Frankincense is an aromatic resin used in incense and perfumes, obtained from trees of the genus Boswellia in the family Burseraceae, particularly Boswellia sacra (syn: B. bhaw-dajiana), B. carterii33, B. frereana, B. serrata (B. thurifera, Indian frankincense), and B. papyrifera. The English word is derived from Old French “franc encens” (i.e., high quality incense)

There are four main species of Boswellia that produce true frankincense. Resin from each of the four is available in various grades. The grades depend on the time of harvesting; the resin is hand-sorted for quality.

Frankincense is tapped from the scraggy but hardy trees by slashing the bark, which is called striping, and allowing the exuded resin to bleed out and harden. These hardened resins are called tears. There are several species and varieties of frankincense trees, each producing a slightly different type of resin. Differences in soil and climate create even more diversity of the resin, even within the same species. Boswellia sacra trees are considered unusual for their ability to grow in environments so unforgiving that they sometimes grow out of solid rock. The initial means of attachment to the rock is unknown, but is accomplished by a bulbous disk-like swelling of the trunk. This growth prevents it from being ripped from the rock during violent storms. This feature is slight or absent in trees grown in rocky soil or gravel. The trees start producing resin when they are about eight to 10 years old. Tapping is done two to three times a year with the final taps producing the best tears due to their higher aromatic terpene, sesquiterpene and diterpene content. Generally speaking, the more opaque resins are the best quality. Fine resin is produced in Somalia, from which the Roman Catholic Church purchases most of its stock.

 

Chemical constituents:
These are some of the chemical compounds present in frankincense:

* “Acid resin (56 %), soluble in alcohol and having the formula C20H32O4”

*Gum (similar to gum arabic) 30–36%

*3-Acetyl-beta-boswellic acid (Boswellia sacra)

*Alpha-boswellic acid (Boswellia sacra)

*4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (Boswellia sacra)

*Incensole acetate, C21H34O3[38]

*Phellandrene

*(+)-cis- and (+)-trans-olibanic acids

 

Medicinal Uses:
Frankincense resin is edible and is used in traditional medicines in Africa and Asia for digestion and healthy skin. For internal consumption, it is recommended that frankincense be translucent, with no black or brown impurities. It is often light yellow with a (very) slight greenish tint. It is often chewed like gum, but it is stickier.

In Ayurvedic medicine frankincense (Boswellia serrata), commonly referred to in India as “dhoop,” has been used for hundreds of years for treating arthritis, healing wounds, strengthening the female hormone system and purifying the air. The use of frankincense in Ayurveda is called “dhoopan”. In Somali, Ethiopian, Arabian, and Indian cultures, it is suggested that burning frankincense daily in the house brings good health.

Frankincense oil can also be used for relief from stings such as scorpion stings.

 

Other Uses:
Frankincense is used in perfumery and aromatherapy. It is also an ingredient that is sometimes used in skincare. The essential oil is obtained by steam distillation of the dry resin. Some of the smells of the frankincense smoke are products of pyrolysis.

Frankincense is used in many Christian churches including the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Catholic churches. According to the Biblical text of Matthew 2:11, gold, frankincense, and myrrh were among the gifts to Jesus by the biblical magi “from out of the East.” Christian and Islamic Abrahamic faiths have all used frankincense mixed with oils to anoint newborn infants, initiates and members entering into new phases of their spiritual lives.

Conversely, the spread of Christianity depressed the market for frankincense during the 4th century AD. Desertification made the caravan routes across the Rub’ al Khali or “Empty Quarter” of the Arabian Peninsula more difficult. Additionally, increased raiding by the Parthians in the Near East caused the frankincense trade to dry up after A.D. 300.

The essential oil of frankincense is produced by steam distillation of the tree resin. The oil’s chemical components are 75% monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, monoterpenoles, sesquiterpenols and ketones. It has a good balsamic sweet fragrance, while the Indian frankincense oil has a very fresh smell. Contrary to what some commercial entities claim, steam or hydro distilled frankincense oils do not contain boswellic acids (triterpenoids), although may be present in trace quantities in the solvent extracted products. The chemistry of the essential oil is mainly monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, such as alpha-pinene, Limonene, alpha-Thujene, and beta-Pinene with small amounts of diterpenoid components being the upper limit in terms of molecular weight.

Perfume.
Olibanum is characterised by a balsamic-spicy, slightly lemon, fragrance of incense, with a conifer-like undertone. It is used in the perfume, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

In several Indian cooking frankincenseis used to give a special flavour.

CLICK & SEE THE DIFFFERENT USES OF FRANKINCENSE : 

 

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankincense

Trichodesma Indicum

Botanical Name: Trichodesma Indicum
Family: Boraginaceae
Subfamily: Boraginoideae
Genus: Trichodesma
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Boraginales

Common Names: Indian Borage • Hindi: Chhota Kalpa • Gujarati: Undhanphuli • Kannada: Katte tume soppu • Tamil: Kallutaitumapi • Telugu: Guvvagutti • Marathi: Chota Kalpa • Sanskrit: Adhapuspi

Names in different languages:
Hindi name- Andhahuli, Chotta kulpha , Hetmundiya, Ondhaphuli, Ratmandiya.
English name -Indian Borage
Gujarati name – Undhaphuli
Kannada name – Athomukhi , Kattetumbesoppu
Kashmiri name- Nilakrai, Ratisurkh
Malayalam name- Kilukkamtumpa
Marathi name – Chhotaphulya, Lahanakalpa, Pathari, Gaoza.
Punjabi name -Andusi, Kallributi, Nilakrai, Ratmandi.
Sindhi name- Goazaban
Tamil name- Kiluttaitumpai, Kallutaitumpai.
Telugu name- Guvvagatti.

Sanskrit Synonyms:
Andhaka Because of covering of flowers the flower seems to be absent.
Andha pushpaka Flower is opposed by leaf.
Avak pushpi Flower does not move when wind blows as it is covered by leaves.
Adhah pushpi Flowers which face downwards.
Adhoh mukha – Which face downwards
Amara pushpika Flowers are beautiful
Gandha pushpika Flowers having fragrance
Dhenu jihva Leaves resemble the tongue of cow
Romalu Leaves are hairy
Vashyanga Flower is under control of leaf
Shayalu- That which is always sleeping or not seen
Shata pushpa- That which has hundred flowers

Habitat : It is found throughout India, on roadsides and stony dry wastelands, upto 1,500 m.

Description: This is an erect, spreading, branched, annual herb, about 50 centimeters in height, with hairs springing from tubercles. It is a plant bearing bluish white colored flowers in the month August and which fruits in October. The leaves are stalkless, opposite, lanceolate, 2 to 8 centimeters long, pointed at the tip, and heart-shaped at the base. The flowers occur singly in the axils of the leaves. The sepal tube (calyx) is green, hairy, and 1 to 13 centimeters long, with pointed lobes. The flower tube is pale blue, with the limb about 1.5 centimeters in diameter, and the petals pointed. The fruit is ellipsoid, and is enclosed by the calyx. The nutlets are about 5 millimeters long, and rough on the inner surface.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Chemical constituents:
The seed of the plant contains Linoleic acid, Oleic acid, Palmatic acid and stearic acid. The leaves contains Hexaconase, Ethylhexacosanoate, Ethylester and 21, 24- hexacosadienoic acid.

Ayurvedic Properties:
*Rasa (Taste) – Katu (Pungent), Tikta (Bitter)
*Guna (Qualities) – Laghu (Light for digestion)
*Veerya (Potency) – Ushna (Hot)
*Vipaka – – Katu (Undergoes Pungent taste after digestion)
*Karma (Actions) – Kaphavata shamaka (reduces vitiated kapha and vata dosha)

Medicinal uses: In herbal medicine jargon, it is thermogenic, emollient, alexeteric, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, carminative, constipating, diuretic, depurative, ophthalmic, febrifuge and pectoral. This herb is also used in arthralgia, inflammations, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, dysentery, strangury, skin diseases and dysmenorrhoea.

The herb is used for the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, dysmenorrhea, snake poisoning and localized swelling.

 

Known Hazards: The plant is acrid, bitter in taste. No known adverse effect is reported after the use of this herb.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

 

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichodesma
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Indian%20Borage.html

Trichodesma indicum: Benefits, Remedies, Research, Side Effects

Few Health Problems & Solutions

 

Hair Loosing Problem:-
__________________________

Q: I am a 23-year-old man and I am losing hair from the top of my head. I can already glimpse my scalp between the hairs. I need help!

A: Most men lose their hair because of male pattern baldness. It is inherited and can set in at any age. A plethora of medical conditions such as thyroid disease, mineral and vitamin deficiency as well as heart disease can also cause this. It is important to consult a dermatologist to rule out these conditions. If no treatable cause is found, you are left with the option of regular use of minoxidil solution (if stopped the hair may fall out again), hair transplant surgery or wearing a wig.

Pain During Period:-
_______________________

Q: I have terrible pain during my periods and am unable to go to work for two days. Taking that much leave is really bad for my career.

A: Anecdotally, avoiding caffeine (coffee, tea and cola drinks), alcohol (for those crucial days) drinking at least three litres of water daily, avoiding both refined carbohydrates and calorie dense comfort food (chocolates) and increasing consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables reduces pain in the long run. Certain yoga poses done regularly as well as aerobic exercise for 30-40 minutes a day also helps. For immediate relief of the painful cramp, try a hot water bottle placed on the abdomen and analgesics like ibuprofen or paracetamol.

Urinary   Tract Infection:-
____________________________

Q: I had a hysterectomy several months ago. Following that, I develop urinary tract infection frequently. I have chills, high fever and burning while passing urine. I take antibiotics for a day or two. The fever usually subsides only to recur a week or ten days later.

A: Urinary tract infection is difficult to eradicate, especially if it hospital acquired, follows catheterisation and is recurrent. A culture and sensitivity test of the urine will help to determine the organism and help choose the appropriate antibiotic. It usually needs to be taken for 7-10 days.

Exercise  Wise:-
__________________

Q: Following all your advice in the newspaper I started yoga and running. Every part of my body of my body hurts and I waddle when I walk because of pain.

A: Exercise has to be increased gradually. Start with just 10 minutes a day six days a week. Then increase by 5 minutes a day every week until you reach 40 minutes a day. You need to do stretching and flexion daily as well. It is better to learn yoga with an instructor so that you do the asanas properly and avoid the ones unsuitable for you. Try applying ice to the painful areas. It will provide some temporary relief.

Psoriasis  Gene:-  
____________________

Q: My marriage is being arranged with a man who has a skin condition. I found that it is psoriasis. Is it contagious?

A: Psoriasis is a common skin condition where a faulty immune system makes the skin cells grow so fast that they cannot be shed in a timely manner. They pile up making the skin flaky and itchy. It is not contagious, but certain inherited genes make you more likely to develop it. Your children have a 10 per cent chance of eventually developing psoriasis if you marry this man.

Resources: The Telegrapg (Kolkata, India)

11 foods that lower cholesterol

It’s easy to eat your way to an alarmingly high cholesterol level. The reverse is true, too — changing what foods you eat can lower your cholesterol and improve the armada of fats floating through your bloodstream.

Doing this requires a two-pronged strategy: Add foods that lower LDL, the harmful cholesterol-carrying particle that contributes to artery-clogging atherosclerosis. At the same time, cut back on foods that boost LDL. Without that step, you are engaging in a holding action instead of a steady — and tasty — victory.

In with the good:   

Different foods lower cholesterol in various ways. Some deliver soluble fiber, which binds cholesterol and its precursors in the digestive system and drags them out of the body before they get into circulation. Some give you polyunsaturated fats, which directly lower LDL. And some contain plant sterols and stanols, which block the body from absorbing cholesterol.

1. Oats. An easy first step to improving your cholesterol is having a bowl of oatmeal or cold oat-based cereal like Cheerios for breakfast. It gives you 1 to 2 grams of soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries for another half-gram. Current nutrition guidelines recommend getting 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day, with at least 5 to 10 grams coming from soluble fiber. (The average American gets about half that amount.)

2. Barley and other whole grains. Like oats and oat bran, barley and other whole grains can help lower the risk of heart disease, mainly via the soluble fiber they deliver.

3. Beans. Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take awhile for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal. That’s one reason beans are a useful food for folks trying to lose weight. With so many choices — from navy and kidney beans to lentils, garbanzos, black-eyed peas, and beyond — and so many ways to prepare them, beans are a very versatile food.

4. Eggplant and okra. These two low-calorie vegetables are good sources of soluble fiber.

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5. Nuts. A bushel of studies shows that eating almonds, walnuts, peanuts, and other nuts is good for the heart. Eating 2 ounces of nuts a day can slightly lower LDL, on the order of 5%. Nuts have additional nutrients that protect the heart in other ways.

6. Vegetable oils. Using liquid vegetable oils such as canola, sunflower, safflower, and others in place of butter, lard, or shortening when cooking or at the table helps lower LDL.

7. Apples, grapes, strawberries, citrus fruits. These fruits are rich in pectin, a type of soluble fiber that lowers LDL.

8. Foods fortified with sterols and stanols. Sterols and stanols extracted from plants gum up the body’s ability to absorb cholesterol from food. Companies are adding them to foods ranging from margarine and granola bars to orange juice and chocolate. They’re also available as supplements. Getting 2 grams of plant sterols or stanols a day can lower LDL cholesterol by about 10%.

9. Soy. Eating soybeans and foods made from them, like tofu and soy milk, was once touted as a powerful way to lower cholesterol. Analyses show that the effect is more modest — consuming 25 grams of soy protein a day (10 ounces of tofu or 2 1/2 cups of soy milk) can lower LDL by 5% to 6%.

10. Fatty fish. Eating fish two or three times a week can lower LDL in two ways: by replacing meat, which has LDL-boosting saturated fats, and by delivering LDL-lowering omega-3 fats. Omega-3s reduce triglycerides in the bloodstream and also protect the heart by helping prevent the onset of abnormal heart rhythms.

11. Fiber supplements. Supplements offer the least appealing way to get soluble fiber. Two teaspoons a day of psyllium, which is found in Metamucil and other bulk-forming laxatives, provide about 4 grams of soluble fiber.

Out with the bad:

Harmful LDL creeps upward and protective HDL drifts downward largely because of diet and other lifestyle choices. Genes play a role, too — some people are genetically programmed to respond more readily to what they eat — but genes aren’t something you can change. Here are four things you can:

Saturated fats.

Typical sources of saturated fat include animal products, such as red meat, whole-fat dairy products, and eggs, and also a few vegetable oils, such as palm oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Saturated fat can increase your levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol. But it has some benefits, too — it lowers triglycerides and nudges up levels of “good” HDL cholesterol.

The role of saturated fat in heart disease is currently under debate. For now, it’s best to limit your intake of saturated-fat-rich foods.

Trans fats. The right amount of trans fats is zero! Trans fats are a byproduct of the chemical reaction that turns liquid vegetable oil into solid margarine or shortening and that prevents liquid vegetable oils from turning rancid. These fats have no nutritional value — and we know for certain they are bad for heart health. Trans fats increase LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels while reducing levels of HDL cholesterol.

Recently, the FDA banned trans fats from the U.S. food supply. The phasing-out process is expected to take three years. The encouraging news is that many major food suppliers and restaurants have already substituted healthier fats for trans fats.

Weight and exercise. Being overweight and not exercising affect fats circulating in the bloodstream. Excess weight boosts harmful LDL, while inactivity depresses protective HDL. Losing weight if needed and exercising more reverse these trends.

Putting it all together:

When it comes to investing money, experts recommend creating a portfolio of diverse investments instead of putting all your eggs in one basket. The same holds true for eating your way to lower cholesterol. Adding several foods to lower cholesterol in different ways should work better than focusing on one or two.

A largely vegetarian “dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods” substantially lowered LDL, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The key dietary components are plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains instead of highly refined ones, and protein mostly from plants. Add margarine enriched with plant sterols; oats, barley, psyllium, okra, and eggplant, all rich in soluble fiber; soy protein; and whole almonds.

Of course, shifting to a cholesterol-lowering diet takes more attention than popping a daily statin. It means expanding the variety of foods you usually put in your shopping cart and getting used to new textures and flavors. But it’s a “natural” way to lower cholesterol, and it avoids the risk of muscle problems and other side effects that plague some people who take statins.

Just as important, a diet that is heavy on fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts is good for the body in ways beyond lowering cholesterol. It keeps blood pressure in check. It helps arteries stay flexible and responsive. It’s good for bones and digestive health, for vision and mental health.

Resources: Harvard Health Publications