Parul Phul (Mansoa alliacea)

Botanical Name : Mansoa alliacea
Family: Bignoniaceae
Genus:     Mansoa
Species: M. alliacea
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Lamiales

Synonyms: Bignonia alliacea, Pseudocalymma alliaceum, Adenocalymma alliaceum, Adenocalymma pachypu,Adenocalymma sagotii, Pachyptera alliacea, Pseudocalymma pachypus, Pseudocalymma sagotti

Common Names :Garlic Vine, Wild Garlic, Ajo Sacha, Amethyst Vine
Among the mestizos of the Amazon rainforest it is known as ajo sacha, a Spanish-Quechua name that means “forest garlic” or “wild garlic”.

In Bengali it is called Parul phul or  Lata parul .
In Manipur it is known as Chanamlei

Habitat : . It is native to Northern South America, and has spread to Central America and Brasil.

Description:
Mansoa alliacea is an ornamental evergreen vine, 2-2.5m (6 to 8 feet) tall; opposite leaves divided into two ovate leaflets, up to 15cm (6 inch) long. The leaves are bright green.
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Two special features makes this plant pretty unique: First, the tri-colour blooms. Secondly, its specific garlic-like odor when parts of plants are crushed.
Deep lavender flowers with white throat are fading to a paler lavender as they mature. You will see three different colour of flowers at the same time on the plant. The vine blooms heavily twice a year: in fall-winter and in spring, although it may also have some flowers on and off throughout the year.
Crushed leaves smell like garlic, although of course the plant is not related to the common edible onion or garlic at all. Usually you will only notice the odor when you crush its leaves or prune its branches. The heavy clusters of  flowers do not emit any scent at all, so no worry that the garden or home will heavily smell of garlic when this plant blooms!

Mansoa alliacea can be described as either a shrub or a vine because it produces numerous woody vines from the root, that grows only 2-2.5m (6 to 8 feet) tall and form a shrub-like appearance.

Propagation: Mansoa alliacea can be propagate from cuttings. Semi-hardwood cuttings can be taken for propagation. Each stem should have at least 3-4 nodes and can be stuck into a mixture of sand and compost to start the rooting process, after removing some leaves to reduce water loss. Rooting hormone powder is usually not needed.

Medicinal Uses:
It is a very common and well respected plant remedy in the Amazon.It is considered analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic and anti-pyretic. Both the bark and the leaves are used in tinctures and decoctions. In addition, the leaves are also used as a common remedy for coughs, colds, flu and pneumonia, and as a purgative.  Some capsule products of the leaves are sold in stores in Brazil and Peru, and it can be found as an ingredient in other various multi-herb formulas for cold and flu, pain, inflammation and arthritis in general. The use of ajos sacha is just catching on in the U.S. market; a few products are now available and it is showing up in several formulas for colds and arthritis here as well.

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Other Uses:
It said that this houseplant pushes out all the bad luck from your house. It is one of the most rewarding flowering vines that you can grow, bearing beautiful lavender hued bell shaped flowers. It can be grown in containers and should be trimmed after the flowers are gone. Mansoa alliacea serves a two in one purpose of air purification and treatments (as will be mentioned bellow).

Mansoa alliacea is great for chain link fences (or any fence), or a large trellis. It is a vine with a moderate growth rate and one need not worry that is will become an unruly resident in the garden. It can be grown as a loose flowy bush, but is most attractive on supports, fences, trellises, pergolas, etc. It is a vigorous grower and establishes quickly.

This plant is even used as substitute for garlic in food. The entire plant – roots, stems and leaves – is used in herbal medicine systems in Peru and Brazil. It is considered analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic and anti-pyretic. Both the bark and the leaves are used in tinctures and decoctions. In addition, the leaves are also used as a common remedy for coughs, colds, flu and pneumonia and as a purgative.

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds.

Mansoa alliacea is also effective as a mosquito and snakes repellent.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Garlic%20Vine.html
http://www.somemagneticislandplants.com.au/index.php/plants/296-mansoa-alliacea
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mansoa_alliacea

Mansoa alliacea

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